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October 2, 2014 / 8 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Arab terrorist’

With a Knife to His Throat, Haredi Loses ‘Payos,’ But Survives Hostage Arab Attack

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

A Palestinian Authority Arab terrorist held an orthodox Jewish passenger at knifepoint before releasing him and escaping near Beitar Illit, on the western edge of Gush Etzion, around 8 p.m. (1 p.m. EDT) Sunday night. Watch the video here.

The death threat and apparent hostage attempt follows three murders and two attempted murders by Palestinian Authority terrorists in the past four weeks.

The attacker was an illegal worker who had boarded the No. 148 bus in Beit Shemesh, west of Jerusalem, and demanded that the bus driver let him off at an illegal stop before the IDF checkpoint along the security fence that borders Judea and Samaria.

The driver refused, and the illegal worker drew a knife and held it a passenger’s throat, taking him hostage. The terrorist then proved he was serious in his death  threat and cut off the “payos” (sidelocks) of his victim, prompting the driver to answer the attacker’s demand and stop the bus.

The attacker then left his hostage and jumped off the bus. The army is searching the area, and a helicopter reportedly has joined the search.

A military spokeswoman told The Jewish Press the attacker took the knife with him.

Earlier in the day, rock-throwing Arabs injured one passenger near Beitar Illit, a large Haredi Jewish city, and shares with Maaleh Adumim the distinction of being the largest cities in Judea and Samaria.

Israeli media have almost totally ignored Sunday’s night’s death threat, which apparently was not considered serious since no one was killed or hurt.

The lack of reportage is part of a mass media agenda to downplay terrorist attacks. Evidence of the agenda was the coverage of last week’s tractor terrorist and the previous week’s murder of retired IDF soldier Col. Sraya Ofer in the Jordan Valley.

In both instances, the major Israeli newspapers and the Voice of Israel radio network took pains to point out that it was not certain that the attacks were related to terror, even though an IDF spokeswoman told The Jewish Press shortly after the tractor terrorist attack that the driver “was a terrorist” who tried to run over a soldier.

Terror is not good for the peace talks.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and President Barack Obama have repeatedly said that Palestinian Authority  chairman Mahmoud Abbas  has put a stop to terror, a non-fact that agenda-oriented journalists repeat like parrots. Just to prove the point, one of the more astute reporters covering the U.S. State Dept. totally ignored the tractor terror incident and the murder of Ofer at the State Dept.’s daily briefing, while asking why the Obama administration does not stop Israel from announcing more building projects for Jews in Judea and Samaria.

The reporters never even mention daily rock-throwing and Molotov cocktail attacks, which endangers the lives of thousands of Israeli drivers and passengers who travel the roads in Judea and Samaria to Jerusalem and metropolitan Tel Aviv.

Shortly before 5 p.m. Sunday, when people are returning home from work, a Palestinian Authority terrorist in the area of Shechem hurled a firebomb at an Israeli driver, whose car was not hit.

Update: Tractor Terrorist Tried to Run Over Soldier

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

The “tractor terrorist” who was shot dead by IDF soldiers at an army base Thursday night tried to run over a soldier, an IDF spokeswoman told The Jewish Press.

The driver “tried to run over the soldier several times,” chasing after him as he fled and smashing into several vehicles until soldiers nearby emptied an entire magazine of bullets, killing the driver almost immediately. A concrete block, put there to protect the soldiers is what prevented them from being run over.

The spokeswoman could not confirm or deny reports that the driver was unarmed, but when asked if the army was certain the driver was a terrorist, she replied in the affirmative and stated that he tried to murder at least one soldier.The military is investigating the incident.

The terrorist was identified as Younis al-Obaidi Radaydeh from the Ramallah area village of Beit Hanina. He had arrived at the Rama base near Ramallah around 7:15 p.m. (12:15 p.m. EDT), and the soldier at the gate asked him for his identification papers. While he was examining them, the tractor terrorist smashed through the gate and aimed at a soldier who was standing nearby. Radaydeh managed to drive 150 meters into the base.

The gate fell on the soldier who had been examining documents, causing him light injuries. He was treated at the scene and did not require hospitalization.

While Palestinian Authority  sources said that the parents of the driver had received a notice from Israeli authorities that their house was scheduled to be demolished, there is no confirmation of that claim.

Voice of Israel radio reported that the terrorist’s brother also was a tractor terrorist, Marei Radaydeh, who was killed while trying to run over cars, including a police car, in Jerusalem in 2009.

a-ram tractor 2

In 2008 and 2009, Arabs used tractors in terror attacks inside Jerusalem, killing three Jews and wounding several others.

Keep the Hebron Show Going

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

It happened again.

In 2002, on the first day of the huge Sukkot celebrations, early evening, an Arab terrorist opened fire near the Avraham Avinu neighborhood. As a result, Rabbi Shlomo Shapira from Jerusalem was killed.

Fast forward: Sukkot, September 2013, eleven years later. Almost the same exact time. An Arab terrorist shoots, killing an Israeli soldier, near the “Beit Merkachat” intersection in Hebron. As with Rabbi Shapira, the soldier never really had a chance. A bullet penetrated his neck, leaving an entrance and exit wound. Medical personnel did everything humanly possible. But it wasn’t enough.

Prior to the killing, I could define today as “interesting.” Actually I really don’t know if that’s the right word to use.

More than 10,000 people arrived in Hebron Sunday, filling Ma’arat HaMachpela, walking the streets, visiting the Avraham Avinu neighborhood, all having a good time. One of the day’s highlights was the opening of the Cave of Otniel ben Knaz to Jewish visitors, an event occurring only very few days during the year. This, because the site is located on the “Arab” H1 side of the city.

On holidays, such as today, the 300 meter walk from the “Kikar HaShoter” checkpoint to the holy site is heavily protected, allowing visitors, escorted by soldiers or police, to view and worship at the cave.

But earlier, prior to its opening, I’d received notification of trouble. A firebomb was hurled at soldiers in the area. Rock-throwing, an almost normal occurrence in Hebron, was starting. But the security forces had the situation under control, and dozens and dozens of people walked back and forth to the place.

Me, too. Today was the first day of our special VIP tour. A busload of Hebron friends and supporters visited our newly initiated Tel Hebron overlook, on the roof of Beit Menachem, in Tel Rumeida. They also heard a short talk from Mrs. Tzippy Shlissel (whose father, Rabbi Shlomo Ra’anan, was killed by terrorists in Hebron), and then, too, participated in the walk to the fascinating Cave of Otniel.

I had the privilege to escort a wonderful woman whom I’ve known for about 15 years, Mrs. Ruth Simons, 91 years young, but you’d never know it. When we arrived at the Cave, she climbed up the stairs on her own two legs, entering the site for the first time in her life.

But, honestly, on the way there, and on the way back, I wasn’t entirely relaxed. I’ve done this many times before, and people here, well, sometimes we develop “antennas” which pick up vibrations in the air. And the vibes were definitely there.

Everything and everyone were in place – soldiers, border police, regular police, but, at the same time, booms from stun grenades and rubber bullets being shot at distant attackers, filled the air. It wasn’t, as it usually is, a quiet walk. I was very impressed by my guests. Ruth and her family, who didn’t seem phased in the least. They took it all in stride.

But my insides, my gut, didn’t like it. It is a disgrace for Jews to have to walk down a street to the tune of stun grenades exploding, not too far from them, on a Jewish holiday. Or on any day, for that matter.

But we did it, and that was that.

Later, our guests were treated to a delicious lunch at the Yeshivat Shavei Hebron sukkah and then visited Machpela. After they left, I recalled, for some reason, Rabbi Shlomo Shapira’s murder, as I walked past the site of that terror attack, back to the office.

A little while later, at 6:30, I received a call from my son, who works with security in a community outside of Hebron, asking about the shooting.

“What shooting?”

“There was a shooting and someone was hit.”

It didn’t take long to get preliminary details, where, when, and the victim’s condition: very critical. Together with a few others, we watched soldiers and police running back and forth, huddling, talking in whispers. Ambulances, their red lights flashing, driving by, in all directions. There wasn’t too much else to do, except wait.

Later tonight we’ll meet, and talk, to discuss our reactions.

The first reactions are easily expressible. First, our shock and pain at a young soldier’s death, as a result of an Arab terrorist sniper’s bullet.

Hebron Border Policewoman Taught Us Everything We Need to Know about Chanukah

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

Yesterday morning I awoke to a cute headline in the NRG-Maariv news site. It read “Hebron Arabs: If Israeli Soldiers Return – We’ll Beat Them Up Again.”

Last week, an IDF patrol in Hebron, just past a checkpoint dividing two parts of the city, spotted a uniformed “Palestinian policeman” in an area where he shouldn’t have been. While attempting to arrest him, they were attacked by an Arab mob. Despite the fact that their lives were in danger, rather than shoot or use hand grenades against the attackers, the soldiers took cover inside a butcher store, threw potatoes at the Arabs, and finally ran for their lives.

A similar event occurred a few days later, up north, in Shechem. Anonymous IDF commanders, uncomfortable with the situation, explained that the “rules of engagement” are very complex and soldiers are too highly restricted in the measures they may use, even to defend themselves.

Seeing the headline, I mentioned to several of my friends that this Arab chutzpah cannot go unanswered. Arabs, exclaiming that they will “beat up” Jewish-Israeli soldiers, must be answered, in the harshest of terms.

Last night they received an answer.

There is one main road leading from Kiryat Arba into Hebron. At the bottom of the winding, hilly road, is a right turn, to Ma’arat HaMachpela (Cave of the Patriarchs) and Hebron’s Jewish community. To the left is a checkpoint, manned by Israeli border police. Last night, at about 7:30, during a routine check, a 17 year old Arab man attacked a border policeman, knocking him down to the ground, and then he pulled out a pistol, placing it on the fallen man’s temple. A second officer, a border policewoman, present at the site, seeing the events transpiring, loaded her gun and, without hesitating, shot the Arab terrorist three times, killing him.

It later turned out that the Arab’s gun was a fake, toy pistol. However, made out of black metal, it certainly looked like the real thing. The woman border guard did exactly what she had to, and thank God for that. A partial response to the Arabs quoted at the beginning of this article. The Arabs play for keeps. But so do we.

Seeing Israeli soldiers run from marauding, rioting Arabs is a disgrace. Hearing a policewoman say, “I did what I was taught to do, I was only doing my job,” is a Kiddush HaShem, a sanctification of God’s name.

For two thousand years, in exile from our land, Jews had no choice but to run. Today, we must stand strong and tall, as did the Maccabees, 2,300 years ago, thereby bequeathing us Hanukkah.

The holiday of lights, as Chanukah is called, takes on many expressions and variations. For example: A few days ago we marked the 21st anniversary of the passing of a friend and fellow Hebron resident Yona Heiken. Yona was a fascinating man, whom I remember well, showing me his original IBM computer, which cost, probably close to 30 years ago, more than $10,000. Yona and Malka made Aliyah, that is, they came to live in Israel, from the U.S., directly to Hebron. That was quite a move, and Malka has been here ever since. Yona survived a critical injury, after being stabbed in the back by an Arab terrorist in the Kasba. He ran after the terrorist, shooting until he finally hit him, and then, somehow, made his way back to Beit Hadassah, where he collapsed. A real close call. But a few years later he fell to cancer, leaving Malka and their large family here in Hebron.

Every year, at the memorial event, Malka finds interesting people to speak about various subjects. This year, her in-laws provided the evening’s attraction. Avigdor Sharon, among other things, produces wine. He spoke about the process, and brought several different wines to taste. They were very good.

As interesting as he was, his wife, Adi, was, in my opinion, the highlight. She has written several books, including a true story about her mother, who escaped from Rumania with her siblings in World War 2. Finally boarding an overcrowded boat to Israel, they made it as far as Haifa, where the British, refusing to allow them into Israel, sent them to Cypress for a year. At age 17, she finally made it to Israel, fulfilling her dream. Here, she found herself at Kibbutz Yavneh, working as a lookout in a tower, all by herself, night after night. Armed with a World War 2 “Czech” rifle (the 7.92 mm Mauser), she was told to watch for Egyptian airplanes trying to get to Tel Aviv. And if she saw a plane? She was to shoot it down.

One night, suddenly, she heard a buzz in the heavens above. She froze, searching the sky. And then, there it was, an Egyptian plane, flying low, above her. What to do? She raised the “Czech” rifle, pulled the trigger and shot, straight into the plane, which plummeted to the ground. A young refugee woman from Rumania shot down an enemy war plane, with a rifle, all by herself. If this isn’t heroism, I don’t know what is.

This is the same heroism displayed by the young border policewoman who shot and killed a terrorist last night in Hebron. This is the legacy of our ancestors, Mattityahu, Yehuda, and all the others, who fought, against all odds, and won.

As I write this, another group of heroes are celebrating these happy days. Hebron’s children are being treated to a Chanukah play, complete with games, riddles, prizes, and of course, sufganyot, the traditional Chanukah jelly donut. Seeing these joyous children in Hebron is a realization that the dream which began almost 4,000 years ago, here, in Hebron, has borne much fruit, which we have observed over the centuries and are privileged to witness here today.

Chodesh tov – Happy New Month, and Chanukah Sameach – Happy Chanukah!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/hebron-border-policewoman-taught-us-everything-we-need-to-know-about-chanukah/2012/12/13/

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