web analytics
July 26, 2016 / 20 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Jew’

Naomi Returns To Bethlehem; Last Time Jew Does So Without Military Escort

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

{Originally posted to the humor website PreOccupied Territory)

Bethlehem, Judah, June 7 – The widow of the late tribal leader Elimelech came back to her hometown today after ten years in the land of Moab, marking the final time for about three millennia that a Jew will enter the city without need of an armed escort, local sources are reporting.

Naomi and her daughter-in-law Ruth, also widowed from Naomi’s son Mahlon, returned to Bethlehem this morning now that the famine that drove her and Elimelech away has subsided, and hunger no longer hovers over the land. The pair entered the town by themselves, causing a stir, both because the people were shocked to see how Naomi had aged and that they were witnessing the last time a Jew would be able to enter Bethlehem safely not in the company of several men carrying weapons to fend off Arab attackers, at least for three thousand years.

“Is that Naomi?” the townspeople were heard to exclaim, surmising that the withered old woman, once so vigorous and youthful, had decided to come back into the town while it was still possible to do so unaccompanied by soldiers. “Don’t call me Naomi,” she responded, according to witnesses.

“Call me embittered, for the LORD has made it exceedingly bitter for me,” presumably referring to her dire economic circumstances and the fact that for many centuries hence, a Jew would need serious protection upon entering her beloved hometown, lest he or she be attacked by hate-filled Palestinians bent on making Bethlehem judenrein again.

“She doesn’t look too good, she and that Moabite woman,” said a bystander who asked to remain nameless, but who described himself as a relative. “They’re going to have a tough time of it now. I imagine they’ll have to sell some of the family’s ancestral holdings, which will eventually be taken over by Arabs as if it had always been theirs, and then those Arabs will resort to violence to keep Jews from reestablishing their presence here. Also, that daughter-in-law of hers is from Moab, and that’s not such a popular thing around here. At least not with me.”

Other observers had a more favorable assessment. “That takes guts, coming back here under such embarrassing circumstances,” said an elder named Boaz. “I imagine that many, many years from now, the descendants of these fine women will similarly disregard the physical dangers of reestablishing their presence in their ancestral homeland. Of course, it can’t hurt to to have a few strong youths, like my field hands, for protection.”

PreOccupied Territory

How To Get Noticed By Jew Haters

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

I can’t say I’ve encountered much anti-Semitism in my life. I grew up in tranquil suburbs, first outside of Philadelphia, then on Long Island, two regions with heavy Jewish populations, so perhaps that is why.

But now that we live in the age of the Internet, where the whole world is a click away, I have an inkling of what it must feel like to be a Jew in Paris or Amsterdam. I say an inkling because the feeling is generated only through words posted on a screen, by offenders probably far away, while Jewish residents of cities where anti-Semitism rears its head no doubt live in fear for their lives in their own neighborhoods.

An op-ed article of mine titled “A Great Time to Be Jewish” appeared in the May 6 issue of The Jewish Press. It was meant to be an uplifting piece, with its focus on the bright side of being Jewish in these troubled times. But leave it to anti-Semites to fish it out from the online universe and spew their hatred.

On May 8 the following note arrived to both my private and college employer e-mail addresses:

Greetings Harvey,
It’s a great time to be a Jew in Israel or in a train on the way to camp.
Either one is good.
Regards,
[Signed]

I wasn’t surprised to receive this piece of hate mail (it comes with the turf of being a Jewish writer) but I was surprised that the writer had my two e-mail addresses, especially my private one. My first inclination was to write back and tell him what I thought. (In my twenties I wanted to be a Nazi hunter, so I’m not shy about stating my feelings). The writer had signed his name so by merely clicking “reply” I had his e-mail address. But my better sense told me it was not worth my while to respond,

Then the next day I found the article (or rather much of it) posted on the website The Daily Stormer with the title “Jew Press Brags That Never a Better Time to Be a Jew.” Wikipedia describes The Daily Stormer as “an American neo-Nazi and white supremacist news and commentary website.”

Following my article’s introduction, which details some of the unfortunate things happening to Jews today, is the sentence (which the website boldfaced) “And yet this is still one of the best times ever to be Jewish.” The person who posted the article on the hate site then inserted the following line in italics:

The rat kike goes on to give ten reasons why…”

More of my article was quoted and then readers’ comments followed (most of which really don’t even make much sense, but you get the feeling behind them). A sampling:

“Jews have made spectacular contributions to the world in every endeavor known to man. Heard this so many times. Never heard one example.”

“There was just an article saying never a better time to be a racist, so jews [sic] must be racist.”

“Nazis made spectacular contributions. Fax machine, modern computer, rocket science, 40-hour week, cars for everyone, helicopters, jet engines, sports medicine, to name a few.”

“If only Hitler hadn’t died before he could tell us how to do the body fuel thing so we could solve the global warming crisis that’s going to kill us all in the year 2009.”

My article had been posted with both my private and college employer e-mail addresses as well as my work telephone number (so now I knew where the hater who e-mailed me got those addresses).

The whole thing didn’t really upset me because I regarded those who posted the malicious and historically ignorant comments as poor souls whose minds had been tainted by vile propaganda. I felt more sorry for them than angered by them. (But of course our communication was transmitted by harmless pixels across the safety of a screen, and the messages weren’t shouted in person.)

What is scary, however, is that today anyone can find so much personal information about you – your home address, telephone number, e-mail address, employer, names and locations of family members, and much more.

The day after I received the hate e-mail I received a warm e-mail. It came to me via my “author” website, which has a “contact” area that enables anyone to e-mail me through it. The sender wrote:

 

Hi Mr. Rachlin,
I live in Westchester and always enjoy your columns in The Jewish Press.
Do you ever speak in Westchester where it’s open to the public?
Thank you in advance.
[Signed]

 

With the hate e-mail still so fresh in my mind, this one was quite welcome. Two days, two e-mails. One a chilling reminder of human pathology, the other a friendly missive from a landsman.

I chose to focus on the latter.

Harvey Rachlin

Meet The New Jew Haters, Same As The Old Jew Haters

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

The hook-nosed Jew is making a comeback. He may not be featured in the blatantly grotesque caricatures of twentieth-century Nazi propaganda, but remove the thinly veiled overtones and the anti-Semitic content is much the same. New packaging, same vile taste.

Do I sound alarmist? Perhaps. But one can be forgiven for finding parallels to the greatest tragedy that has befallen the Jewish people, especially since that tragedy unfolded a mere seventy years ago. And especially when current parallels are beginning to mirror the origins of that tragedy in terms of methodology and gradual intensity.

Anti-Semitism in our day has been creeping up worldwide much as it did in Nazi Germany – slowly and seemingly linked to other phenomena. Germany did not become a Jew-killing machine overnight. Though the country was always rife with Jew hatred, no one, during Hitler’s early rise, anticipated an out-and-out policy of mass murder. A methodical and increasingly comprehensive trashing of the Jewish character was used to justify the marginalization of Jews, their subjugation, and, finally, their extermination.

A small but notable current exhibit at the New York Historical Society, “Anti-Semitism 1919-1939,” depicts the rise and power of the Nazi party through propaganda. After viewing the display of artifacts, publications, signs, book covers, even currency, I was struck by the dichotomy inherent in German indoctrination leading up to and following the enactment of the Nuremberg Laws of 1935.

A running theme of Nazi propaganda before the Nuremberg Laws was Jewish culpability for the economic disaster that befell Germany following World War I. And it ran the gamut of stereotyping Jews as rich moneygrubbers on the one hand to Bolsheviks and communists on the other. Conspiracy theories of Jewish world domination through capitalism and politics struck an eager chord with Germans ready to blame the devastating inflation and unemployment on anyone but themselves. A Nazi slogan printed on a 1,000 reichsmark banknote in 1932 read “The Jew takes our gold, silver and bacon and leaves us with this garbage…. Come to Hitler, become a National Socialist.”

Once the propaganda took hold, it was easy to transition from the written word to concrete forms of punitive legislation. Because after all, if Jews were responsible for all of Germany’s tribulations, why shouldn’t they be punished by being prohibited from working, studying, and generally living as other Germans? Nazi ideologues no longer had to resort to referencing the “capitalist” or “Bolshevik” evils of the Jews. The gloves came off. Now it was “Dirty Jews” or untermenschen.

It took nearly two decades for Nazi propagandists to push the anti-Semitic tendencies of the Aryan nation to their extreme and brutal conclusion. In our globalized world twenty years seems like an eternity. Which is why, despite the fact that the Holocaust is still recent history and there is widespread awareness that such atrocities can and did indeed happen, any resurgence of anti-Semitism today should be cause for alarm. Particularly when that resurgence seems to be following a distressing pattern.

Anti-Israel sentiment – usually indistinguishable from plain old anti-Semitism – began to grow and spread, almost imperceptibly at first, shortly after the 1967 Six-Day War; took on a harder edge during and after the 1982 Lebanon war; and fairly exploded in the aftermath of the failed Oslo Accords. In the span of two decades, the ill-begotten euphoria over Oslo turned into disappointment and frustration, with Israel almost universally blamed for Palestinian duplicity and terror. The flow of events presented the perfect opportunity for Jew hatred to become legitimate once more.

Substitute the words “capitalists,” “cheaters,” or “parasites” for “occupiers,” “colonizers,” or “Zionist imperialists” and— presto! – you have the new lingo of 21st century anti-Semites. The Protocols of the
Elders of Zion
? Old school. Now there’s the “Powerful Jewish Lobby.” And in the ultimate debasement of language and reality, Jew haters use Holocaust references to castigate Israel for defending itself.

While it would be terribly gauche to yell “dirty Jew” while Holocaust survivors with tattoos on their arms are still alive, there seems to be nothing wrong these days with yelling “Zionist pig.” The virus infests academia and the UN, many mosques and some churches. It thrives in England’s Labour Party and in far left and far right political factions across Europe and South America. How else could BDS have spread so quickly in Europe and on college campuses the world over?

Traditional anti-Semitism from right-wing neo-Nazi type groups exists, but it is not nearly as prevalent as what is coming from the left. And while leftists can hardly be expected to malign Jews as socialists, they’ve borrowed a page from the Nazi handbook to justify singling out the Jew. How easy it is to condemn the Jew for his alleged abuse of others.

Fifty members of England’s Labour Party were recently suspended over anti-Semitic remarks that focused mostly on Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. But can anyone doubt that in many or most of the cases their sentiments are uncomfortably close to the old-fashioned Jew hatred that reigns at England’s Oxford University? The harassment and intimidation of Jewish students there has reached a level that prompted Oxford’s Labour Club co-chairman Alex Chalmers to quit a few months ago after complaining that many of its members “have some kind of problem with Jews.”

Such an admission is a frank assessment of the animosity facing too many Jews today. Although Israel’s critics utilize the phrase “cycle of violence” in a dishonest manner, the cycle does exist between Israel and its enemies, notably the Palestinians. But it goes something like this: incitement against Jews leads to violence against Jews, which in turn increases incitement against Jews.

Last week Israelis celebrated Yom Ha’Atzmaut – Independence Day – immediately after marking Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day. Some see the juxtaposition as one of cause and effect, with the horrors of the Holocaust paving the way for the birth of Israel. A vigorous counterattack is already long overdue against those whose vicious propaganda is aimed at reversing that cause and effect by using Israel to pave the way for more anti-Semitism.

From educators to politicians to the media, such indoctrination must not only be denounced but fought tooth and nail. The battle must begin with exposing the haters and their methods and end with ridding the world of its oldest scourge.

Sara Lehmann

Egypt is Colorful and Full of Love; Meetings of Conciliation between Muslim and Jew, in Egypt: Part II

Sunday, April 24th, 2016

Dr Omer Salem of Yale and AlAzhar Universities envisions a borderless world open to movement and communication between all peoples. A traditionalist Sunni Muslim, he studied Hebrew Bible at Yale and had his PhD dissertation supervised by Al-Azhar University Professors in Cairo. His thesis – acceptance of the People of the Book in Islam, a theme that is pulling in the opposite direction of the less embracing schools of thought in Islam today, schools which have been propped up of late more by politics than religious doctrine.

In this spirit, Salem invited Rabbi Dr. Yaakov Nagen, Fullbright Scholar Dr. Jospeh Ringel, and myself to meet his colleagues in Egypt. Impossible! My smart aleck retort was, “sure I will catch the next train.” But within two weeks we were on Egyptian soil and in earnest dialogue with some of the best minds of Cairo today. Here is a small glimpse of what we dream will be many more encounters.

Al Azhar University was founded by the Fatimids in the tenth century CE and is the oldest university in the world still functioning. Today it is considered the center of Islamic and Arabic scholarship. The university administers about 4000 teaching institutes and a system of schools with about two million students nation-wide.

Enter the campus, humanity’s stunning variety greets you in the beauty of all its rainbow colors – Indonesians, Africans, black, white, some in western dress, some in traditional garb. This richness accompanied us to professor Awad’s office – an enormous room which over the next two and a half hours would host our marathon discussion, with students and faculty entering and exiting, some participating, some just listening. The atmosphere was respectful and congenial throughout, albeit the discussion veering into some very sensitive subjects.

Before our arrival, we debated an essential question – how can the Muslim ummah – nation – accept Jews? Assuming that the hurdles were largely theological, we discussed the approach that Jews can take to Muhammad; a Navi, prophet, has vastly different connotations in Jewish thought than in Islamic thought. Rabbi Joseph Ber Soloveitchik’s essay, “Confrontation” presents an illustration of how essential terms cannot be imported and exported across cultures, indeed, meaning is lost in translation. In Judaism, a Navi can be false and even wicked, as in the case of Bilaam (Book of Numbers). So when Muslims ask Jews, “Do you think Muhammad was a prophet?” the connotations differ vastly. What we can say is that prophecy for the nation of Israel ended with the prophet Malachi, but that does not mean that prophecy stopped for all nations. In the spirit of the Rambam, who dwelled in Egypt as physician and Rabbi, we can appreciate that Muhammad spread monotheism globally, and that he could indeed be a prophet for the other nations of the world.

We would see however that the theological hurdle is in fact not the greatest stumbling block to reconciliation.

“Welcome, welcome!” Dr Awad beckoned, along with staff and students flanking him. The men were removing their shoes, should I? Do women remove their shoes as well? They do, but I can remain shod if I choose. Both equality of women and free choice are basic premises in Islam, the professor would make quite clear. But that is not my emphasis just yet, I have something more important for you to hear.

Professor Awad’s thesis was on the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. He emphasized that dialogue is a primary tenet of Islam. “The Qur’an commands us as Muslims to engage in dialogue to reach truth.” He stated.

“The differences between people are G-d given.” And he quoted, “O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that ye may know each other. .” Qur’an 49:13. (Arabic: لتعارفوا) Lita’arafu – to know each other. You can respect Islam and the prophet and the Qur’an, without necessarily following the sharia of Islam, and that is your right.”

He added, “There is no coercion in religion,” Qur’an 2:256

“Muslims are commanded to study the teachings of the prophet Moses. For you, learning about Muhammad is merely optional. That is an expression of tolerance inherent in Islam. The Qur’an has provided solutions for so many problems in the world, and it commanded Jews to judge according to their own Torah. This is evidence that the Qur’an is a very neutral, objective book. Jews have a right to study the Qur’an without anyone judging whether they believe in it or not. You are indeed welcome to read it with your good intention.”

Jewish Press contributor, Rebecca Abrahamson in front of Al Azhar University

Jewish Press contributor, Rebecca Abrahamson in front of Al Azhar University

I introduced myself as a Haredi woman, and added that I had traveled with the agreement of my husband and the blessing of my Rabbi. There I had braved it all the way to Egypt, overcoming personal and societal hurdles. I made that statement in order to express a living traditional value and to pave the way for more fundamentalist Muslim and Jewish women to join in social activism. When fundamentalist women act, they move large areas, they bring whole families and societies with them. And we know that we are not docile followers. I love the story from an African-American fundamentalist church in the southern United States, a woman stood up and challenged her preacher, “that’s not written in my Bible!” Fundamentalist women are in dynamic dialogue with their family and leaders. When we act, we actually move large areas of ground.

But I liked the professor’s response:

He looked at me a little sharply, “Women and men are equal. The only difference is she has a right to be provided for.” Then he ticked off her rights on his fingers, “she has freedom of work, dignity, employment, she may divorce, and she does not need her husband’s permission to travel.” I smiled inside.

Then the professor touched upon difficult subjects, and though his tone remained respectful, his passion and concern was evident. Something was irking him, it was clear.

Discovering a Stumbling Block

He wondered at the verse in the Torah that declares Canaan as cursed – where is the justice in that? All have free will, how can anyone be cursed from birth? “Certainly you are accountable for what you do.” (Qur’an 16:93) He wondered why Jews do not proselytize to other nations, is that an uncaring approach? And, with equal passion, Dr Awad questioned how the revelation at Sinai could have been in Hebrew – the Jews had just exited Egypt? This final question was expressed with as much concern as the previous two, though I felt that whatever language was spoken at the time of the Revelation at Sinai was surely less important that wondering if Judaism is discriminatory.

Rabbi Nagen responded – “you have raised the most important questions. My whole life I am searching for answers to these questions. We know that holy books sometimes have verses that seem troubling. For me, the verse that is most important is that all of humanity has one father and is in the image of God. Anything that seems to contradict this puzzles me and we struggle with it. We know that with both Torah, Gospel and Qur’an, people can quote verses to do great good or not good. Our task is to find a way to teach good from the Torah and Qur’an. The question is – what is the rule and what is the exception? What is the context? I read the Qur’an and I know that every sura begins with All-h is Rachman. If I find a verse that seems violent, I know this must be talking about a particular context and it’s not the rule. I have hundreds of students; I interpret the Torah and Talmud. I organized a prayer rally to protest the alleged arson attack in Kfar Dumas. I am part of a group of a thousand Rabbis, we put out a thirty page pamphlet that was read in synagogues that week.”

The professor could not be placated, there was something nagging at him. And then it came out:

“We as Muslims are not asked to judge others; however we cannot accept oppression by one people over another people or making mockery of one over the other.”

So that was it. Agree or disagree, this was the professor’s central concern, and it was echoed in our meetings with Dr Aly El-Samman, former advisor to Anwar Sadat, and with Professor Wagee AlShamy of Dar Oloom College in AlFayoum, a city south of Cairo.

Indeed, Dr Wagee Al-Shamy asked us to proclaim this message – “tell your people: the state of the Palestinian Arabs is of great concern to us. That is the real stumbling block to normalization. Please ease their plight; that will pave the road to better relations between our peoples.”

Agree or disagree, that was the message we heard throughout our trip. So it is not scripture or theology that divides. Negative light is shed upon Judaism when Israel is seen as oppressing its Arab residents. Looking for the cause of the injustice, our scriptures are held up as possibly blameworthy.

But is this not how we feel when presented with injustices wrought by other cultures? Do we not point to the source of an ‘Other’s’ impropriety as based in their basic tenets? As much as what I am saying may sting, and we can certainly feel the call to defend Israel’s need for self defense, or the real meaning of holy writ, we need to consider – if this is what prominent Egyptian Muslims are saying, and even asking us to proclaim this, it does mean that the situation is a lot more hopeful than if stumbling blocks to normalization were scripture and theology.

So what are we to do? Embark on a grand-scale hasbara (explanation) campaign? There are better places we can put our energy; injustices are best addressed, in my husband Ben Abrahamson’s words – by establishing joint Jewish-Islamic religious courts. They existed in Yemen, and they can exist now. This gives both Muslim and Jew a feeling of a common language. Once injustices are addressed in a framework that both sides revere, the view changes. The diamond tossed up to the light reflects various hues, constantly changing as it turns before the sun, yet the diamond remains the same. We do not have to change our very being; we just need to address concerns where all parties are heard in the language they revere the most.

“Show me the fatwa.”

Ben was once speaking to a sheikh who was criticizing Israel. Ben said simply, “show me the fatwa.” Instead of relying on media reporting, Ben challenged the sheikh to find an Islamic court which has investigated an allegation of injustice and issued a fatwa – ruling. Knowing of none, they both relaxed and fruitful discussion followed.

The best hasbara campaign to defend Israel and Judaism will never really be enough; there is not the trust and common language needed for such efforts. The gap can be bridged not via hasbara, which is likely to fall upon deaf ears, but via joint courts. Joint Jewish-Islamic courts will succeed in striving for justice, trust building, and an expanded narrative that finally will include all residents of the Holy Land. It will be a huge relief to us all.

We had been welcomed by the professors at AlAzhar in warmth and parted with love and hopes of future dialogue. Yes, things can get rocky in discussion, but if you believe that the Other is coming from an honest place, then only the late hour and weariness born from a marathon conversation brings it to a close.

And we will work for more such encounters. We must.

(Left) Rabbi Yaakov Nagen with Dr Joseph Ringel,

(Left) Rabbi Yaakov Nagen with Dr Joseph
Ringel,

Rebecca Abrahamson

Polish Man Passes as Orthodox Jew, Bakes Challas, Leads Prayer, Disappears

Sunday, April 24th, 2016

Alicja Kobus, an official of the Poznan, Poland, Jewish community, last Thursday reported that her community had been fooled by a Polish Catholic man who pretended to be an Orthodox Jew, AP reported. The man, who said his name was Ya’akav Ben Nistell, an Israeli from Haifa, wore a beard and sidecurls, and lead the congregation in Hebrew prayers. His real name is Jacek Niszczota, a cook from Ciechanow in north-central Poland.

The hoax was revealed when Niszczota’s neighbors in Ciechanow saw him on television in an ecumenical ceremony of with Catholic, Muslim and Jewish leaders, and told local journalists how their Jacek had become Ya’akav.

The Poznan community has since posted a warning on its website, saying Niszczota “deceived not only the community members but also other people with whom he cooperated on behalf of the Poznan Jewish Community.”

“He won our trust with the good things that he was doing: he baked challahs for Israel Independence Day ceremonies, he helped with maintenance of Jewish cemeteries, he had the right knowledge,” Kobus told AP.

His knowledge was deep enough to lead prayers and give lectures on Jewish tradition that were flawless. And when people addressed him as “rabbi” he did not correct them, Kobus said. She believes Niszczota picked up all that good information, including his Hebrew, by listening to Israeli Radio — which shows you what good-quality radio can do for you if you only pay attention.

Poland’s Chief Rabbi Michael Schudrich said he knew Niszczota and found him to be “very sweet and smiley.” The chief rabbi also noted that the entire affair is an indication of the growing clout of things Jewish in Poland, which only 70 year ago helped annihilate millions of its Jews.

“Who 30 years ago in this country would have pretended to be a rabbi, to say nothing of 70 years ago?” Schudrich noted.

It should also be noted that despite the shock expressed by the community leader about the deceit, she, too, had nothing bad to say about Jacek Niszczota, who has disappeared since his outing.

JNi.Media

Israeli Jew Convicted of Murdering of Jerusalem Muslim Teen

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

by Michael Bachner/TPS The Jerusalem District Court convicted Yosef Chaim Ben David, 29, on Tuesday morning of the abduction and murder of Jerusalem Arab teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir in July 2014. The teen was on his way to a mosque in his neighborhood, Shuafat, when he was kidnapped. The incident rattled the region and played a key role in escalating the tensions leading up to the summer war in Gaza.

Ben David, from the community of Adam, was the central suspect in the murder, along with two minors. His verdict was delayed by several months to determine his mental state, following claims by his lawyers that he was mentally ill and not responsible for his actions.

The court, however, ruled that Ben David “was not in a psychotic state, fully understood what he was doing, had control over his actions and had the ability to refrain from committing the crime.”

Abu Khdeir was 16 years old when he was abducted and burned alive in Jerusalem by the three Israeli Jews. The murderers claimed they wanted to avenge the kidnapping and murder of three Jewish teens by Hamas terrorists just days earlier. The two atrocities sent tensions soaring between Israelis and Arabs from the Palestinian Authority and Gaza, culminating in the IDF’s 2014 Gaza campaign, Operation Protective Edge.

Ben David’s two nephews, 16 and 17 years old, were convicted in January of committing the murder along with him. One of them received a life sentence. The other was sentenced to 21 years in prison after the court ruled that he played a lesser role in the murder.

Before the verdict, Abu Khdeir’s father Hussein called on the Israeli government to demolish the homes of his son’s murderers, in keeping with Israeli policy of demolishing the homes of Palestinian Authority terrorists. “We need justice from the court,” he said. “These murderers should have their homes demolished. Such people cannot be granted parole. He needs to serve a life sentence.”

Following the conviction, the state prosecution released a statement saying that Ben David committed the murder “out of nationalistic vengeful motives, also dragging his underage relatives with him who participated in the heinous crime and were sentenced to many years behind bars.”

In the Palestinian Authority and in Gaza, people celebrate the murders of Israeli Jews, honking car horns and passing out sweets to strangers in the streets when an attack has taken place.

Public squares, special events and streets are named for especially “successful” terrorists so their deeds will be remembered and glorified for future generations.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

American Jew Arrested for Murmuring Prayers, 2nd Warned to Close Prayer App

Sunday, April 17th, 2016

An American Jewish man was arrested on the Temple Mount on Sunday morning after it was noticed that he was quietly murmuring a prayer, according to a TPS report. At this time it is unknown if the arrested man is an Israeli citizen or a tourist.

A second Jew was warned by the Israeli police that he would be arrested if he didn’t stop looking at the Siddur app on his cellphone. He was not arrested as he wasn’t yet praying at that point.

Prime Minister Netanyahu can relax, his status quo has been upheld.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/american-jew-arrested-for-murmuring-prayers-2nd-warned-to-close-prayer-app/2016/04/17/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: