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July 29, 2016 / 23 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Tel Aviv’

Jerusalem Mayor to Avoid Thursday’s Pride Parade While Securing Its Path

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

A year ago this month, Ishai Schlussel, a known Haredi criminal who had just been released from jail after serving time for attempted murder in the 2005 gay pride parade in Jerusalem, was allowed by a negligent police to attack the 2015 gay parade, where he finally managed to murder a teen girl, Shira Banki, and six others. And so the 2016 Jerusalem gay pride parade has naturally become a kind of Selma march to condemn hate and violence, attracting thousands. But Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat announced that he would not march in this likely the most publicized gay parade in Israel’s history.

Barkat told the media on Wednesday that he supports the rights of gay people to parade in his city, and that he plans to “lay down a flower” on the spot where young Shira Banki was murdered, because he fiercely objects to anyone using violence in a political debate. But at the same time Barkat still feels that the gay pride parade is a bad idea in Jerusalem, because it needlessly offends hundreds of thousands of religious people in the city.

It was a complex decision by the mayor of the most important city in Israel, in the midst of a political environment that does not tolerate complexity and nuance. And, obviously, Mayor Barkat’s move has already been added by many to the long list of “homophobic” political acts by “hating” Israeli public servants. But Barkat should be admired, not condemned, for his sensible decision to facilitate and provide security for the parade which he openly admits he’d rather not have in his citry.

Unlike the Tel Aviv gay pride parade, which ravenously takes after New York City, Rio and New Orleans in its all-out explicit gesticulations and exhibitionism — the Jerusalem parade is more about people walking in an orderly fashion with rainbow flags, singing and yelling out anti-hate and pro-tolerance slogans. Still, Barkat argues that he would hurt many of his residents’ feelings were he to associate himself directly with the march which promotes acts specifically prohibited by scripture.

Meanwhile, Schlussel’s mother and five of his brothers were detained on Wednesday by police, as were 11 rightwing activists. They were all warned to stay away from the parade’s route, and then released. According to Walla, as is usually the case in such business, most of the rightwing activists were not aware there was going to be a parade Thursday and thanked the cops for keeping them informed.

The fact is no one is allowed to stand where the parade is going, the sidewalks will be kept deserted by heavy police guard (of whom, presumably, 3 to 10 percent are gay). According to Jerusalem District Commandeer Major General Yoram Halevy, there will be only two points where the marchers will experience contact with the non-marching public — at the beginning and at the end. Participants will have to report to the start point, undergo security check and receive an ID tag. But the controls will be in place even earlier on: participants from outside Jerusalem will be arriving in buses and will be checked before boarding. And so, as is often the case in our self-protecting democracies these days, what was meant as a lively, vivacious exchange of ideas and, yes, insults, between excitable people, will be reduced to a safe, but quite zombie-like affair.

Which, to some extent, means that Ishai Schlussel actually defeated the gay pride parade with his despicable attack, making it less gay and less proud.

JNi.Media

What If They Commissioned an Anti-Settlements Exhibition and the Pictures Came Out Pastoral and Innocent?

Sunday, July 17th, 2016

Ragnar Kjartansson is a widely exhibited Icelandic performance artist. In a 2002 work called Death and the Children, he dressed up in a dark suit and carried a scythe, leading young children through a cemetery, answering their questions. In a 2006 live performance titled Sorrow Conquers Happiness, he wore a tuxedo and played the role of a 1940s nightclub crooner with an orchestra, singing, “Sorrow conquers happiness” over and over as the music swelled. In 2011, Kjartansson won the inaugural Malcolm Award at Performa 11, the visual art performance biennial, for his 12-hour work Bliss, which was performed without a break at the Abrons Arts Center on the Lower East Side of Manhattan with repeated performances of the finale of Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro,” the moment when the count gets down on one knee and asks his wife for forgiveness, which she grants in an aria. Icelandic tenor Kristjan Johannson played the count.

For his exhibition titled Architecture and Morality, at the Center for Contemporary Art in Tel Aviv this season, Kjartansson, according to a press release, was going to “create a new, ambitious body of paintings within the specific context of Israel. He will spend two weeks painting the urban landscapes in the West Bank ‘En plein air’ (a fancy French term the press release misspelled and which means ‘outdoors’) akin to his performative painting practice over the past few years.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

So Ragnar Kjartansson took his canvas and stand and paints and brushes and went en plein air to various Jewish settlements in Judea and Samaria, and what he brought back was, well, not so bad. He painted what he saw (a paraphrase on the New Yorker’s surrealist Gahan Wilson’s book of horror cartoons), and apparently he saw none of the blood curdling evil normally associated with the term “settlements” on the corner of south Tel Aviv’s Tsadok Hacohen and Kalisher Streets, which is where the CCA is located.

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Or, as Galia Yahav put it in Ha’aretz this weekend, “The houses are rendered separately, one per painting. All of them are drawn from the front and fill the canvas in the same way and from the same distance. The style is blatantly amateurish and naïve, as though from a hobby group, deliberately bland, with obedient brushstrokes and a filling of blank spaces, turgid coloration and pedantically mimetic attention to detail.”

But, most upsetting, from Yahav’s point of view, “the result is a small, suburban neighborhood of villas, completely artificial, in which little Israeli flags attached to parked cars wave in the breeze and larger ones flop from the windows of houses. Without addresses or names of specific settlements, this artistic tactic poses with feigned innocence in the likeness of a 19th-century pilgrimage, in which the Holy Land is portrayed through misty eyes.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

In other words, this cutting-edge performance artist, who was going to do to the settlements what Edvard Munch did the screaming, came away from those colonialist, apartheid-dispensing satanic neighborhoods with a fairly bland set of impressions, which is what one could expect from suburban bedroom communities anywhere.

“Perhaps the idea was to depict a generic quality of life rife with sated insensitivity – architecture as amorality,” Yahav tried to dig up some evil from under those middle class shaggy rugs. “Or perhaps it’s the realization of violent fantasy through painting: the occupied territories without Palestinians, a heaven on earth.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Curator Chen Tamir wrote that Kjartansson’s settlements paintings “tell a story about the banality of everyday life amid complex political turmoil.” Maybe. But it ain’t in those paintings. Indeed, Tamir conceded that the entire Kjartansson exhibition “is a bold statement on art’s futility in the face of social and political strife.”

Or maybe, just maybe, the Icelandic artist discovered and then made a point leftwing art critics can’t afford to admit: that things in those Jewish settlements and in all of Judea and Samaria, just aren’t nearly as bad as they are in many other, more troubled places, such as London, Paris, Brussels, Nice and Istanbul.

JNi.Media

UPDATE: Swiss Air Force Escorts El Al Plane Following Bomb Threat

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

The Swiss Air Force scrambled fighter planes to escort an El Al flight from New York to Tel Aviv around their borders following a bomb threat against the flight.

The Swiss F-18 planes escorted the El Al flight along the French-Swiss border, according to Swiss media.

Israel radio said that German fighter planes were scrambled too.

It is unclear what the fighter planes would actually do if there was a bomb on board.

The flight is continuing on to Tel Aviv’s Ben-Gurion Airport without a problem. It’s expected to land between 12:32 PM to 12:40 PM Israel time. Update: The plane has landed safely at around 12:43 PM.

El Al released a statement that an anonymous threat was received, and the plane is continuing to Ben-Gurion airport as planned.

According to the Israeli Foreign Ministry after conferring with El Al, US airport authorities received an anonymous threat of a bomb in the kitchen of the El Al plane. The American authorities informed the Swiss authorities as the plane was then over their airspace. The Swiss then scrambled their fighters.

The El Al crew checked and did not find any bombs on board in the kitchen or elsewhere.

Update: The plane has landed safely at Ben-Gurion Airport at around 12:43 PM.

Jewish Press News Briefs

El AL Flight to Paris Nearly Departs Without Air Marshals

Monday, June 27th, 2016

An El Al flight to Paris from Tel Aviv was forced to return to the terminal after it began making its way to the runway, according to a Channel 2 report.

According to the report, the flight’s security guards never got onto the airplane. When the staff realized the undercover guards weren’t there, the plane returned to the terminal to pick them

The plane took off an hour late, which is nothing too serious compared to the other delays El Al flights have been suffering over the past week.

At least they didn’t forget the pilot.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Israel’s Heroes – Caleb, Moskowitz, and Weinkrantz

Friday, June 24th, 2016

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

First, on Spiritual Cafe, Rabbi Mike Feuer and Yishai discuss the Death that was let into the world with the rejection of the Land of Israel, and the heroic alliance between Caleb and Joshua that saved the Jewish people. Then, Yishai brings you to the funeral of Dr. Irving Moskowitz, a great Jews who was the patron of Jewish re-settlement in the whole Land of Israel. Finally, Alan Weinkrantz was a tech PR guru who was tragically killed last week in a Tel Aviv car accident. Hear Yishai’s interview with Alan from only a year ago.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Moshe Herman

2016 Genesis Prize Awarded to Israeli Violinist Itzhak Perlman

Thursday, June 23rd, 2016

The third annual Israel Genesis Prize was awarded Thursday evening to native Israeli virtuoso violinist Itzhak Perlman.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sarah hosted the 2016 Genesis Prize laureate violinist on Thursday (June 23) at the Prime Minister’s Residence in Jerusalem.

The Netanyahus congratulated the internationally-renown musician on winning the prize and expressed their appreciation of his unique contribution to the Jewish People as an artist and teacher — and for his work on behalf of special needs children.

A long-time advocate for the disabled, Perlman had also participated with 170 athletes with disabilities earlier in the week in the Etgarim (Israel Association for the Disabled) Marathon in Jerusalem.

This year’s award ceremony was held Thursday evening at the Jerusalem Theater under the direction of Oscar-winning actress Helen Mirren.

Netanyahu first announced the Genesis Prize in 2012. The award is presented under the auspices of the Government of Israel, the Jewish Agency and the Genesis Philanthropy Group. The goal of the prize is to emphasize the contribution of Jews to world history and bring the younger generation of the Jewish world closer to the State of Israel and Jewish identity.

In awarding the 2016 Genesis Prize, Netanyahu told Perlman, “You are an advocate for those whose bodies are disabled but whose spirits never can be. Winning the Prize is not end of the journey but rather, just its beginning.”

Perlman knows first-hand the challenges faced by those with special needs; at the age of four he contracted polio, a deadly disease that left him in a wheelchair for life, without the use of his legs. “The Genesis Prize is especially meaningful to me, to receive this award here in Israel in the country of my birth,” Perlman said. The violinist left Israel at age 13, after completing his initial training at the Academy of Music in Tel Aviv. He went on to study at the Julliard School, where he is currently an instructor.

But it was Itzhak Perlman’s appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show soon after his arrival in the U.S. that alerted the international arena that a new world-class violinist was about to step on the stage.

Perlman has performed as a conductor with major orchestras across the world — including with the New York Philharmonic, Montreal Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic and Israel Philharmonic.

In addition, he has been awarded 16 Grammy Awards and four Emmy Awards, most recently for the PBS documentary, ‘Fiddling for the Future.’ The film is about the Perlman Music program founded by him and his wife Toby for young musicians who need support to enable their music talent to flourish.

The virtuoso has also been involved with major movie music scores, collaborating on American films such as Schindler’s List and Memoirs of a Geisha as well as the 2002 Chinese film, Hero.

Perlman, a father of five, will mark his 70th birthday with three album releases and a worldwide concert tour.

TPS / Tazpit Press Service contributed to this report.

Hana Levi Julian

Three Wounded, 12 Vehicles Damaged in Terrorist Ambush on Rt. 443

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

A well orchestrated ambush by Arabs on Rt. 443, the alternative highway connecting the Tel Aviv metro area with Jerusalem via Modi’in, resulted in three Israelis injured from stones and broken glass and damage to a dozen vehicles.

Highway 443 image 3

According to motorists who spoke to News 0404, late Monday night masked Arab terrorists poured oil on the highway about two miles east of the Maccabim check post, then stood by the side of the road and as each Israeli car arrived and started swerving on the oil, they smashed it with very large stones. At least 12 vehicles were seriously damaged, as windows and windshields were cracked and broken, as well as the sides and roofs.

Security forces were alerted and arrived on the scene shooting at the terrorists.

Arab media sources reported that four attackers were wounded in addition to the one Arab who was killed.

Update: The IDF is investigating if the IDF troops accidentally shot and killed an Arab bystander and wounded a second Arab who were not involved in the attack.
Please see this story for more information.

Also on Monday night, at 11:52 PM, Arabs set fire to an IDF post near Al Arub using a Molotov cocktail. At 11:34 Arabs threw stones at an Israeli vehicle in Huwara, Samaria, causing heavy damage. At 11:04 Arabs set fire to the Gva’ot forest in Gush Etzion. At 10 PM Arabs threw stones to vehicles in Huwara, Samaria. At 8:03 PM Arabs rioted near Zeita Jamma’in in Samaria.

In other words, a normal evening.

Highway 443 image 2

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/three-wounded-12-vehicles-damaged-in-terrorist-ambush-on-rt-443-photo/2016/06/21/

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