web analytics
December 4, 2016 / 4 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Tel Aviv’

Commuter Alert: 3 Tel Aviv Train Stations Close for 8 Days

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Israel Railways has announced that for the next eight days, three of the four main Tel Aviv train stations will be closed for business in order to carry out infrastructure work.

The work is being carried out in order to prepare for the new fast rail line between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, which is hopefully set to begin operations in two more years.

But this week’s closure, meanwhile, is only adding to the already congested situation on the railway line that links Tel Aviv with the rest of the country, so here’s all the info you ever wanted to know about which trains are running where, when and how.

* * *

All of the Tel Aviv stations except Haganah will be closed down from Monday, Sept. 19 until Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 05:00 am. These include Hashalom, Savidor Central and University stations.

Changes that will be made to the remaining, reduced operating lines include the following:

Trains SOUTH OF TEL AVIV: These will end at Haganah station.

Trains NORTH OF TEL AVIV: These will end at Herzliya.

Suburban lines: Trains from Binyamina will operate to and from Herzliya.

There will be no Tel Aviv-Haifa express trains. There will, however, be a special express train bypassing Tel Aviv, between Be’er Sheva and Nahariya, and trains between Binyamina and Hod Hasharon.

Night trains between Nahariya and Ben Gurion International Airport will also operate to and from Herzliya.

The Herzliya-Jerusalem (Malha) line will operate between Beit Shemesh and Lod only, according to the Globes business news website.

There will also be special shuttle bus service to replace those trains that are not running during the infrastructure work, and existing bus service will run more frequently.

“We are aware of the inconvenience caused by these works, and are acting together with the Ministry of Transport to provide travel alternatives,” Israel Railways CEO Boaz Tsafrir told Globes.

Hana Levi Julian

Search & Recovery Ends as 3 More Bodies Pulled from Tel Aviv Parking Lot Rubble

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

Three more bodies — the last of six — were recovered over the weekend from the rubble of the collapsed underground parking lot building under construction in Tel Aviv.

Since Monday, 500 IDF soldiers from the Home Front Command search and rescue division, as well as officers and civilian organizations pulled 10 people from the wreckage of the building.

“For six days forces … have been operating to save lives from the destruction site,” said IDF Home Front Command Major-General Yoel Strik. “Today the efforts have come to an end with the extraction of the last trapped from under the rubble, unfortunately lifeless.

“We send our condolences to the families. We will continue to aid during disaster as long as we are needed to set an example as a professional search and rescue body.”

The forces used “up to date technologies” to rescue as many people as possible, alive, said Colonel Amir Ulu, commander of the Dan District.

“During the entire extraction multiple rescue forces and organization took part in the effort,” he said.

Hana Levi Julian

Head of Search in TA Building Collapse, as 3rd Dead Discovered: Time Not on our Side

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

“Time is not on our side,” said Home Front Command chief for the Metropolitan Tel Aviv District Colonel Amir Ulu, who described the challenges facing hundreds of rescue workers at the collapsed building where three have died—the third victim discovered Tuesday morning—and 23 injured so far. On Monday night the rescuers lost contact with two victims who until then could be heard from under the layers of dirt and destruction. “The more time passes, the more problematic it becomes to find living victims, although in the past we’ve rescued collapse victims after 30 hours,” Ulu said.

Rescue worker with dog at the site of the building collapse September 5, 2016 in Ramat Hakhayal, Tel Aviv.

Rescue worker with dog at the site of the building collapse September 5, 2016 in Ramat Hakhayal, Tel Aviv.

As dark was setting at the collapsed, 4-story parking garage under construction in Ramat HaKhayal in north Tel Aviv, the rescue teams mapped the construction site, but the dimensions and sheer mass of the detritus and debris posed a significant difficulty. “It can take us hours to reach each one of the mapped areas,” Yonatan Raz, Ulu’s deputy, told Walla. “But the command’s decision is that we’re not leaving. We have the capacity to remain here for 48 hours, with the hope of finding trapped victims who are still alive.”

The rescuers believe there are four more people under the collapsed structure. Overnight the site was flooded with high voltage lights and shifts were changed frequently, to maintain the workers’ alertness. The rescuers are fearing additional collapses in two spots, which they continue to monitor. “The structure has stopped moving, which is good news,” Ulu said Tuesday morning.

Ulu related that only a week ago, commanders from the Home Front Corp, Police and MDA underwent a course intended to regulate communications between them in the event of a major disaster, “And here we are, applying what we’ve learned, unfortunately,” Ulu concluded.

David Israel

Updated: Building Collapses in Tel Aviv – Multiple Injured [video]

Monday, September 5th, 2016

A parking lot structure collapsed on Nehoshet Street at the corner of Habarzel street in Tel Aviv, in the Ramat Hachayal neighborhood, on Monday morning just before 11:30 AM.

Dozens of people have been trapped and injured.

The 4-level underground parking lot was under construction at the time. There is speculation that a crane on top of the structure may have caused the collapse.

As of 1:30 PM, it is known that 3 of the floors collapsed, and rescue workers haven’t yet been able to reach the 4th level.

Moshe Levy, a volunteer EMT with United Hatzalah reported from the scene: “When I arrived I found numerous hurt individuals who were conscious and who extricated themselves from the area of the collapse under their own power. It appeared to me that the roof of a parking garage had collapsed in the building site. While members of our ambucycle unit who arrived first on scene were treating the injured, reports came in of other people who were unaccounted for and likely still trapped inside. Firefighters and rescue teams are working to extricate them. At this time the wounded we are treating are suffering from minor injuries and are all fully conscious.”

According to MDA, 18 people have been treated and sent to the hospital with injuries. Among them: 1 seriously injured worker who was sent to Ichalov hospital, 1 moderately injured person who also sent to Ichalov hospital, and 16 lightly wounded people who were sent to Ichalov, Tel HaShomer and Wolfson hospitals.

Four of the people were rescued from under the rubble. Two of them guided the rescue teams to their position. The rest were found above ground.

9 people are still missing. 7 workers are known to be trapped under the rubble.

Rescue forces have established communications with 2 people trapped under the rubble.

 

Photos below the videos.

Tel Aviv Building CollapseThe building that collapsed. Photo: Eitan Elcharaz / TPS

Tel Aviv Building CollapseThe roof of the garage that collapsed. Photo: United Hatzalah

Tel Aviv Building Collapse
Rescue teams at work. Photo by Kobi Richter / TPS

Building collapse in Tel Aviv
Rescue teams at work. Photo by Kobi Richter / TPS

Building collapse in Tel AvivThe rescue staging area. Photo: Eitan Elcharaz / TPS

Building collapse in Tel Aviv
Rescue workers inside the collapsed structure. Photo by United Hatzalah

Building collapse in Tel Aviv
IDF Rescue unit on site / IDF Spokesperson

Jewish Press News Briefs

Samaria Jew Indicted for Shooting at Arab Taxi that Tried to Run Him Over

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

A young resident of Samaria was indicted on Sunday for endangering lives on a traffic lane when he shot an air gun at an Arab taxi on Aug. 24, 2016. The shot smashed the car’s rear window but no one was hurt. The police and Shabak announcement described the suspect, Moshe Yinon Oren, 18, a resident of Ronen Hilltop, which Police referred to as Arusi Hilltop (the settlement is named after Ronen Arusi, who established it), as a “rightwing extremist” who was risking human lives.

A search in Oren’s home yielded an air gun that was used in the even described in the indictment, an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) which he is accused of driving during the event, an empty magazine for plastic bullets caliber 5.56, gas canisters, a sling, and a metal box containing 37 anti-vehicle spikes.

The Police and Shabak announcement also says Oren has confessed to the charges and reenacted the event: he arrived on his ATV at Route 60 near the main Yitzhar junction, where police say he shot his air gun at the Arab taxi and fled the scene.

However, according to legal aid society Honenu, whose attorney Itai Rosin represents Oren, the indictment and the announcement omit a crucial component, namely the fact that the Arab taxi veered off its path in an attempt to ram Oren’s vehicle. According to Rosin, on Aug. 24 his client was riding his ATV on the road leading to Har Bracha, when the taxi, with five Arab workers inside, veered of its path on the opposite side of the road in an attempt to ram his vehicle, forcing him off to the shoulder of the road.

In response, Oren turned around and gave chase after the taxi, catching up with it at the roundabout of the Hawara Village, at which point he pulled out his air gun and shot the car’s rear window. A week ago Saturday night he was arrested and spent the week in a Shabak interrogation facility without contact with a lawyer, even though the indictment does not accuse him of a weapons violation or a hate crime.

Attorney Rosin said in a statement that his client, “a young man who is about to enlist in the IDF, felt threatened as a result of the wild driving of the complainants, and used a toy gun, an air gun. This is not a ‘price tag’ action, my client does not belong to this group or another, and the indictment itself does not accuse him of race- or weapons-related violations. It is inconceivable that my client would be investigated by the Shabak and be kept from seeing his lawyer, a harsh and ongoing violation of his fundamental rights, all of it under the cover of a gag order as if this were a serious security violation. If the same acts had been committed by a boy from Tel Aviv or Herzlia he would certainly not have been interrogated by the Shabak and kept from meeting an attorney.” Rosin added, “I am certain these discrepancies will receive their proper attention during his trial.”

David Israel

Let Us Violate Shabbat So As To Sanctify It

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

“He who wants to enter the holiness of the [Sabbath] day must first lay down the profanity of clattering commerce, of being yoked to toil. He must go away from the screech of dissonant days, from the nervousness and fury of acquisitiveness and the betrayal in embezzling his own life. He must say farewell to manual work and learn to understand that the world has already been created and will survive without the help of man. Six days a week we wrestle with the world, wringing profit from the earth; on the Sabbath we especially care for the seed of eternity planted in the soul. The world has our hands, but our soul belongs to Someone Else….

The seventh day is the exodus from tension, the liberation of man from his own muddiness, the installation of man as a sovereign in the world of time….

The Sabbaths are our great  cathedrals; and our Holy of Holies is a shrine that neither the Romans nor the Germans were able to burn…”

(Abraham Joshua Heschel, The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man [NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1951] pp. 13, 29, 8)

Shabbat is serious business, not only because of its halachic requirements but also because of its magnificent and majestic message. To violate it is not just a transgression but a tragedy. Its desecration undermines what it means to be human and to be a real Jew. It deprives mankind of its own sublimity.

It is not the renouncement of technical progress that Shabbat requires but rather the attainment of some degree of independence from an ever-increasing race and cruel struggle for our physical existence, in which we are all involved and which denies us embracing the presence of an eternal moment.

There is only one sanctity that is even greater than Shabbat and that is the holiness of the human being. When we have to choose between these two sanctities, Jewish law is clear: The human being takes precedence. (Yoma 85b; Rambam, Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Shabbat 2:3)

If it is true that the Tel Aviv Light Rail and the high-speed train connecting Tel Aviv and Yerushalayim will indeed save countless human lives by having people switch from car to rail, Halacha will without any doubt demand of us to work on Shabbat to complete construction as soon as possible. Any postponement would be a terrible violation of Halacha itself.

But as Jews, let us make it into a celebration. We can observe Shabbat while working on this holy day. Instead of asking non-Jews to take our place, let us gather as many religious Jews as possible to join in this undertaking and do this work in the spirit of Shabbat and Halacha. Here are some suggestions:

We can organize shacks at the work sites where some people will make Kiddush and where a special Shabbat atmosphere will be created and tasteful Shabbat meals, kept warm according to the laws of Shabbat, will be served. There will be alternate minyanim where the workers can hear the reading of the parsha and say their Shabbat prayers in shifts. Participants can sing Shabbat songs and someone can say a nice d’var Torah informing everyone of the great mitzvah they are performing by working on the holy Shabbat so as to save lives.

Lets us give all the workers colored Shabbat helmets and ask all others who stand by to give instructions to wear nice kippot.

There can be flags and ribbons flying and large posters displayed at the work sites proclaiming: “The people of Israel shall keep the Shabbat, observing the Shabbat throughout the ages as a covenant for eternity.”(Shemot 31:16);“And one shall live by them [My laws]” (Vayikra 18:5)… “and not die because of them.” (Sanhedrin 74a)

Let us make a Jewish celebration out of this. We can show our fellow Israelis and the world that we love Shabbat but that it will not stand in the way of the sanctity of human life. It will actually advance our spirit and commitment to Judaism. Let us reveal that Halacha can deal with the requirements of a modern democratic Jewish state in an unprecedented way.

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Let us not fail to live up to the challenge of making us all proud to be committed Jews.

After all, is it not Shabbat that made us Jews and that now gives meaning to the State of Israel? Why, in fact, be Jewish if not for this great institution called Shabbat?

Sure, some of my readers will say that these suggestions are insane. But let us not forget what philosopher and writer George Santayana once said: Sanity is madness put to good use.
 

Rabbi Dr. Nathan Lopes Cardozo

Everything You Wanted to Know About the Shabbat Train Coalition Crisis – and Weren’t Afraid to Ask

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

The Shabbat infrastructure railroad works that have rocked Israeli politics over the past two weeks have been going on quietly during Shabbat for the past ten years, with the Haredim turning a blind eye on them, and everybody remaining happy. Now at least two wars are being waged over the same routine works, one between Prime Minister Netanyahu and Transport Minister Yisrael Katz, the other between UTJ and Shas and the Prime Minister and Transport Minister — because the rule of thumb for Israel’s Haredi parties is that as soon as a government violation of Shabbat is exposed publicly, it must stop or the Haredim walk. That was the reason the Haredim stood up on their hind legs a week ago, when the Israel Train Company announced delays in entering Tel Aviv on Shabbat due to infrastructure work that could not be done during the week.

The Israel Railways corporation is state-owned. It means that, unlike the privately owned bus and taxi services, which operate during some or all of Shabbat, depending on the city, the railroad must obey the laws of Shabbat, at least as long as the Haredim are part of government. “Had the railroad company continued to perform those projects quietly, without media attention, the Haredim would have kept quiet,” a source inside UTJ told JNI.media. “But as soon as it became known, no Haredi party could remain in government with those works going on.”

This was the root of the crisis which on Sunday morning is paralyzing traffic across Israel. Someone at the IR decided to make a big announcement — most likely because they had the public’s interest in mind. The infrastructure works necessitated closing down Rt. 20, an eight-lane highway that cuts through the Tel Aviv metropolitan area and on Shabbat ushers in thousands of shoppers and entertainment seekers from around Israel.

As soon as they became public, those railroad projects turned into a ticking bomb. Last week, the Haredim accommodated the Netanyahu government, because, frankly, Netanyahu has been the most pro-Haredi prime minister ever, and anyone who would replace him would necessarily be harder to work with. So they agreed to the concept that there were some infrastructure projects that had to be carried out on Shabbat, because on regular weekdays they would threaten the lives of the thousands of motorists roaming nearby.

The following Thursday, before the most recent Shabbat, the Haredi parties again examined the planned works and approved three out of the 20 proposed projects as, in fact, constituting risk to lives on weekdays.

But over the past week there were growing voices in the Haredi community that expressed doubt regarding the very idea that the secular Transport Ministry, which is not run by rabbis, would rule on halakhic issues such as Pikuach Nefesh (Heb: saving a life). As a result, those three approved projects received added scrutiny from the Haredi politicians, who concluded they were no different from the rest and should be carried out on weekdays as well.

The former chief rabbi of Israel, Rabbi Yisrael Lau, told Israel Radio that secular politicians are trying to “hold the stick on both its ends,” a Talmudic term meaning trying to argue both ends against the middle. On the one hand, Rabbi Lau said, secular politicians are demanding that businesses be permitted to stay open on Shabbat, because Shabbat is the only time hundreds of thousands of Israelis are able to pack Tel Aviv in search of shopping, dining and a good show; on the other hand, Shabbat is when those railroad works should be carried out because that’s when the city is empty, and none would be harmed from potential work accidents.

The train infrastructure works which began at 5:30 PM Friday, were interrupted two hours later by an order from the prime minister’s office, after Shabbat had already begun. These works constituted the three out of 20 projects which the Haredi Parties initially agreed were dangerous to life had they been carried out during the week, but then those same Haredim had a change of mind and/or heart, at the very last minute, literally.

Initially, the PM’s office and the Transport Ministry ordered the Israel Train Company to proceed with the works into Shabbat, as had been the case every month for the past 10 years. A group of 200 employees arrived at 5:30 PM at the railroad track segment between Tel Aviv and Hertzlia, and started to take it apart. But later that same early evening, the Haredi parties announced they reject the compromise, which is why at 6:30 PM, moments before the start of Shabbat, the PM’s office ordered the work to stop.

The order reached the workers at the site at about 7:30 PM, and they dropped everything and left. No one bothered to consider what would happen Saturday night and Sunday, since it would take about 25 hours to complete the work. A similar infrastructure project near Atlit, south of Haifa, was likewise interrupted Friday night.

So, who is the real culprit in this crisis? The Haredim for insisting that a government in which they are members not openly desecrate Shabbat? The Prime Minister’s office, which capitulates to Haredi pressure because this coalition is probably the best political combination Netanyahu could have hoped for, and he’s not giving it up over one day’s suffering by Israeli passengers? Or is it Transport Minister Katz, who chose to turn an ordinary, behind the scenes project that’s been going on uninterrupted — into a full-blown coalition crisis?

We suggest all of the above. And the solution to this crisis will probably be the firing of Transport Minister Katz, because he started it, looking to erode the boss’s coalition. Expect blood — Yisrael Katz has friends inside Likud, who may rise up to defend him, as Welfare Minister Haim Katz has already done.

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/behind-the-headlines-haredi-parties-cannot-participate-in-government-that-works-on-shabbat/2016/09/04/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: