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April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Yom Kippur’

Eshet Chayil Presents Insight on Yom Kippur

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

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Yishai presents an archive segment from Malkah’s Eishet Chayil Show. This segment is specifically presents interesting insights about Yom Kippur. Enjoy!

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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When Yom Kippur and 9/11 Fall on the Same Week

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

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Yishai& Malkah discuss Yom Kippur and Sep 11th, both happening to fall on this week. They move on to give good news from Israel and also some not so great news. Listen in and get inspired!

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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Violent Guards and Violent Haredi Extremists Duel in Beit Shemesh

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Six people were wounded and 10 were arrested at a Beit Shemesh construction site Monday when violent Arab guards beat Haredi extremists who broke into a construction site where the Haredim claim Jewish graves are being desecrated.

The guards blocked medics from treating the injured, one paramedic said.

One of the construction site’s project managers is Aryeh Golobinzitz, who is Haredi from Jerusalem and who previously has been beaten up by members of the extremist Atra Kadisha sect. Police detained Golobinzitz and another manager for questioning, along with six security guards and two Haredim.

The protesters broke into the site, and the guards beat them, and one of the victims claimed he was hit with a metal rod during the brawl, which is only the latest of several clashes. Police arrested more than two dozen people last month after hundreds of  Haredi extremists blocked roads and set fires.

Leading Haredi rabbis have rejected Atra Kadisha claims that the construction is taking place over Jewish graves.

In the spirit of the Days of Awe and Repentance, rabbis from Atra Kadisha and from the opposing Edat Haredim community agreed that an inspector from Bnei Brak would be present at the site to make sure no Jewish graves are desecrated.

The agreement lasted as long as Rosh HaShanah and the Fast of Gedaliah, the day afterwards.

On Monday, five days before Yom Kippur, the agreement was as worth as much as the Rosh HaShanah vows to be law abiding Jews reaching out to each other with love and understanding.

On Yom Kippur, which falls on Shabbat this year, there probably will not be any protests, but nothing is certain.

French City Closes Street to Traffic through Yom Kippur

Sunday, September 8th, 2013

The city of Metz in eastern France has closed one of its streets to vehicular traffic for the High Holiday season through the end of Yom Kippur.

The closure of Rabbin Bloch Street was announced by TCRM, the public transport company of the Messine region, approximately 40 miles northwest of Strasbourg, citing “the Jewish holidays.” The closure began on the afternoon of Sept. 6 and will continue until the end of Yom Kippur, the night of Sept. 14, its website said.

The announcement of the closure provoked angry reactions by some Muslims, who said it reflected a double standard in French authorities’ attitude to Jewish and Muslim sensibilities in applying separation of church and state.

One of France’s leading Muslim news sites, islametinfo.fr, published an editorial on Friday stating that although “it is normal for residents to respect the wishes of others in special moments,” the hitherto uncontested closure at Metz “begs comparison” with a ban imposed in 2011 on street prayers by Muslims in Paris.

Marine Le Pen, leader of the ultranationalist Front National, compared the prayers to “the occupation” — a reference to the Nazi occupation of France. The street prayers at Barbes were the result of overcrowded conditions at the local mosque.

“Strangely, extremist politicians have not found it important to intervene at Metz,” the editorial read. “The double standard that has been applied on secularism has been allowed to endure for too long.”

Metz’s Jewish community, which first established itself in the city in the 16th century, had approximately 4,000 members in 1987, according to the Encyclopedia Judaica. Several Jewish institutions are located on Rabbin Bloch Street.

Rabbi Elie Bloch, head of the Metz community during the Holocaust, saved the lives of 15 Jewish children whom he helped hide from the Nazi occupation. He died at the age of 34 with his family after the Nazis arrested them and sent them to their deaths in a concentration camp in Poland.

We’ll Start the Year 5774 by Eating on the Fast Day

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

The Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashannah starts in just a week.  It’s a two day Jewish Holiday even in Israel.  It’s actually the only such Holiday on the Jewish Calendar.  Jews in chutz l’Aretz, Outside the Holyland, also celebrate Succot, Shmini Atzeret-Simchat, beginning and end of Passover and Shavuot as two-day Holidays.  For us in Israel, they are one-day holidays, so we need fewer festive meals (and generous calories.)

My husband and I have been married for forty-three years.  The first year we were married coincided on the Jewish Calendar and days of the week just like this year. Two and a half months later, less than a month before Rosh Hashannah we docked at Haifa Port and began our lives as Israelis.  I’ll never forget my shock and disappointment at discovering that my very first Jewish Holiday as a Jewish wife would be a “three day Rosh Hashannah.”

“…but I thought that there weren’t three day yoniffs in Israel!!”  I complained bitterly.

We had no family to invite us, to support system. I had hardly even cooked Shabbat meals in the two months we were married, especially since we had arrived.  I had minimal kitchen equipment in our newly renovated ancient Old City Jerusalem apartment and was still trying to figure out shopping logistics.

All these decades later, I still feel panic when the calendar repeats the quirk.  Easy years are those when my freezer is empty and I can precook and freeze food.  But this year the freezer is too full making it rather complicated to plan a menu that will stay fresh for three days.

The third day of the Jewish Year is supposed to be a very important fast day, Tzom Gedalia, the Fast of Gedalia.

Tzom Gedaliah (Fast of Gedaliah) is an annual fast day instituted by the Jewish Sages to commemorate the assassination of Gedaliah Ben Achikam, the Governor of Israel during the days of Nebuchadnetzar King of Babylonia. As a result of Gedaliah’s death the final vestiges of Judean autonomy after the Babylonian conquest were destroyed, many thousands of Jews were slain, and the remaining Jews were driven into final exile.

Shabbat is the third day of the year, and it’s forbidden to fast on Shabbat, except for Yom Kippur, the only day holier than Shabbat.  And since the tenth day of the year is Yom Kippur, an exact week after Tzom Gedalia, this week we fast on Shabbat.

This year Tzom Gedalia will be observed on Sunday.  Tzom Gedalia is one of the “minor” fast days, those when we only fast during daylight, unlike Yom Kippur and Tisha B’Av which last twenty-five hours, like Shabbat.  But the Fast of Gedalia is considered a very serious fast, since the death of Gedalia is connected to the end of Jewish sovereignty in Biblical Times.

There is another aspect of the Fast of Gedaliah that relates to the Era of the Redemption. This fast was instituted because the tragic assassination of Gedaliah extinguished the last embers of Jewish sovereignty in Eretz Yisrael after the destruction of the First Beis Hamikdash.

Considering the state of our Israeli Government today, how our politicians kowtow to foreign ideals and leaders which endanger the continued existence of the state, I think that we should make every effort to properly commemorate the Fast of Gedalia by talking about it on the Shabbat immediately following Rosh Hashannah and fasting the following day.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Does Israel Recognize Itself as a Jewish State?

Sunday, August 25th, 2013

A government press release, referring to Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot as the “autumn holiday” raises a question whether the Netanyahu administration recognizes Israel as a Jewish state, a demand it has made of the Palestinian Authority.

The Government Press Office sent a letter to “press attaches at foreign embassies” with an invitation to attend a “Spirituality and History Tour of Jerusalem” next month.

The “spirituality” part is a bit hard to understand unless it is limited to Christianity.

“We will watch the Armenians march from their theological seminary to prayers in the St. James Cathedral, in the Armenian Quarter,” the letter stated.

“We will then proceed to the Jewish Quarter where will hear about the autumn holidays, visit the Old Yishuv Court Museum and ascend to amazing view from the roof of Aish HaTorah Yeshiva,” it continued.

“We will end our tour at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre where will hear about Jerusalem’s multi-faceted Christian communities while observing ceremonies of the various sects.”

There are two glaring absences. One, there is no reference to Islam, which like it or not, is part of the history of the Old City.

The other and more blatant gaffe is the mention of “the autumn holidays.”

Autumn holidays?

A case could be made by a secular Jew that Sukkot really is all about the harvest and is one of the three Festivals in which agriculture is a major part.

But Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur?

Would the GPO dare refer to refer Christmas as “the winter holiday?”

The Jewish Press asked a couple of questions from people involved in the tour, and everyone emphasized there was no slight intended and that, in fact, the holidays do fall in the autumn.

One person indeed was taken aback and said that the question would be looked into.

It would be too complicated to explain non-Jews that they are “High Holidays” – then you have to explain what is a “low” holiday.

To explain “Tishrei,” the month in which the holidays occur, requires a long span of listening attention, although Ramadan is accepted.

But Jewish? Can’t they even say the word “Jewish?”

Before the High Holidays, the GPO will send out its annual multi-page explanations of the Jewish holidays, allowing all of the foreign journalists to study the spirituality, if they want to wade through it all.

Maybe on the actual “Spirituality and History Tour of Jerusalem,” the autumn holidays will become Jewish.

One person told The Jewish Press,” Don’t make a mountain of a mole hill.”

Well, we are, because those when those little mole hills pile up on each other, they become a big, big mountain.

Manischewitz Debuts Kosher Recipe App

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The Manischewitz Company, leader and innovator in Kosher foods, announces the beta version debut of their free Kosher Recipe App now available for download on all Apple and Android devices. The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide app makes its debut just in time for the fall Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Notable chefs, cookbook authors, and everyday home cooks submitted hundreds of recipes for the app which spans many occasions including Passover, Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Shabbat, Shavuot and more. Other categories of recipes include gluten-free, everyday meals, lunches, side dishes, and desserts.

The contributor’s shared many recipes, some of which have been in their family for generations. In addition to the recipes supplied by home cooks and well-known chefs, all recipes from finalists and winners from all past Man-O-Manischewitz Cook-Off Contests have been included as well. Jamie Geller, cookbook author and found of The Joy of Kosher magazine and website, contributed numerous recipes across all categories.

Key App Features Include:

All Kosher recipes that use Manischewitz ingredients Recipes for Holiday and everyday including Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Passover, Shabbat, Shavuot, 4th of July, Purim, and more Holiday fun facts Shabbat times for each week Recipe sharing on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest

Besides being kosher and easy to prepare, all the recipes feature some of the most popular Manischewitz products including all natural broths, noodles, matzo, matzo meal, honey, and many more. It is very easy to find recipes by typing in keywords or searching through the categories. The app will be an easy way for families to find new favorite recipes that can be shared and enjoyed at holiday and everyday meals.

The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide can now be downloaded for free to any Apple or Android device by searching for “Manischewitz” in the App Store for Apple devices, and the Google Play Store for Android devices, or by visiting the respective stores at the links below:

(Apple)

(Android)

Israeli Team Fined for not Playing Davis Cup Match on Yom Kippur

Monday, August 12th, 2013

The Israel Tennis Association has been fined more than $13,000 for refusing to play a Davis Cup match against Belgium on Yom Kippur this year in the world group playoffs, the highest level of Davis Cup play.

The Belgian Tennis Association turned down Israel’s request to postpone the game on Sept. 14. The International Tennis Federation, which sponsors the Davis Cup, intervened and changed the date of the match to Sept. 15, but it ordered the Israeli national team to pay the Belgian team for the inconvenience of adding a day to the tournament, Yediot Acharonot reported.

“The Israel Tennis Association is a non-profit organization, which designates all of its funds to promote tennis in Israel and develop Israeli tennis players. As a result, the high fine is a detrimental blow for the budget of the professional program for the Israeli tennis teams and to Israeli tennis in general,” Israel Tennis Association Chairman Asi Touchmair said in a statement on the association’s website.

“As an institution that represents the State of Israel and its values, we in the Israeli Tennis Association stand proud, before all those who refuse to recognize the importance of the Jewish tradition, on behalf of Israel and Jews world over,” the statement said.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-team-fined-for-not-playing-davis-cup-match-on-yom-kippur/2013/08/12/

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