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July 29, 2016 / 23 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘drones’

Germany to Lease 5 Israeli Cargo Drones

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Germany’s Ministry of Defense will lease from Israel Air Industries (IAI) five Heron TP unmanned aerial vehicles, in a $666 million deal. The drones will be operational in 2018. A former drone leasing deal with Germany was specifically for aerial intelligence-gathering missions. The Herons, on the other hand, are capable of carrying payloads of up to one ton.

David Israel

Israel, Jordan Close Deal on Drones to Fight ISIS

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Israel and Jordan have inked a deal for Jerusalem to supply the Hashemite Kingdom with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to combat Da’esh (ISIS).

The announcement is a sign of increased cooperation between the two countries in the face of a common enemy. Last month it became known that Israel supplied Jordan with 16 Bell AH-1E/F Cobras it had previously retired from service.

Images seen online on August 13 also showed Royal Jordanian Air Force Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcons parked next to Israeli Air Force Boeing F-151 Eagle (Ra’am) fighters at Lajes Field in the Azores on their way to the United States for joint exercises, accompanied by a group of Israeli Air Force KC-707 fuel tankers.

The Heron TP strategic UAV produced by Israel Aerospace Industries and the Elbit Systems Skylark tactical UAV are reportedly needed to support Jordanian special ground forces as they do battle with Da’esh (ISIS) in Iraq, according to Jane’s. The terrorist group seized control over the sole crossing on Jordan’s common border with Iraq a year ago.

A total of 12 drones of both types are to be delivered to Jordan, the DEBKAfile website reported, although there has been no confirmation of the claim. Elbit denied the report, according to Jane’s.

The Heron TP is the largest and most sophisticated UAV in service since entering the IDF in 2010. The drone can fly to an altitude of 45,000 feet and stay there for up to 40 hours if necessary.

Recently the drone has been approved to carry the IAI (Tamam) M-19HD electro-optical sensor turret which includes zoom and spotter high-definition (HD) day cameras, an HD infrared (IR) zoom camera; laser designator; laser rangefinder; laser pointer, near-IR laser illuminator; electron-multiplied charge-coupled device (CCD) camera; and short-wave IR camera.

Hana Levi Julian

Report: Israel Largest Maker Of Drones, UK Largest Importer

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Published on Jewish Business News

Over the past 30 years, the UK has become the world’s largest importer of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones), taking in a third of all deliveries, while Israel has risen to dominate the market as the largest exporter, outselling the U.S. 3-1, the Guardian reported, citing SIPRI, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

UAV is a general reference to an aircraft without a human pilot aboard, but the kind of UAV that’s being manufactured and perfected in Israel and the U.S. are the armed drones, which have been used in recent years by the U.S. military to attack Pakistan-based terrorists.

The bulk of the criticism voiced over the past decade regarding these attack is the vast amount of collateral damage they’re causing, as many civilians are killed along with the identified target.

According to the Guardian, though, those killer drones account for a surprisingly small fraction of the overall trade, a mere 2.5%.

The UK tops the list of importers, having received 55 drones from Israel and 6 armed UAVs from the US, which came to more than a third of global deliveries between 2010 and 2014.

According to the same report, Israel is the largest exporter of drones. Between 2010 and 2014, it delivered 165 units worldwide. The U.S. delivered 132, and Italy 37. Since 1985, Israel has made 60.7% all global UAV exports. China, which has taken on making and exporting armed UAVs, supplied only 0.9% of total exports in the same period.

Elbit is the Israeli manufacturer of 6 different UAV models: The Elbit Systems Hermes 90 is designed for tactical short-range missions using a heavy-fuel motor.

The Elbit Systems Hermes 450 is a medium size multi-payload model, designed for tactical long endurance missions. It has an endurance of over 20 hours, with a primary mission of reconnaissance, surveillance and communications relay.

The Elbit Systems Hermes 900 Kochav (Star) is a medium size multi-payload model designed for medium altitude long endurance (MALE) tactical missions. It has an endurance of over 30 hours, can fly at a maximum altitude of 30,000 feet, with a primary mission of reconnaissance, surveillance and communications relay. It has a wingspan of 15 m and weighs 2,134 lbs, with a payload capability of 660 lbs.

The Elbit Systems Skylark I and Skylark II are Miniature UAVs, used in large quantities for high-tempo support of ground forces.

The Elbit Silver Arrow Mini-V is a small reconnaissance UAV, powered by twin, 4 horsepower piston engines, one in a nacelle on each wing driving a pusher propeller. It has no landing gear. The Micro-V appears to be too small to carry a full sensor turret, carrying a miniaturized imager in a transparent section built into the middle of its fuselage.

The Elbit Silver Arrow Sniper is a reconnaissance UAV, resembling a conventional private aircraft with fixed tricycle landing gear, driven by a nose-mounted propeller and a 38 horsepower piston engine.

JBN / Jewish Business News

More Boys with Toys

Friday, September 19th, 2014

It doesn’t matter your age, and there’s no embarrassment in other boys knowing, boys like toys that fly and that make big, loud sound, or do other cool stuff. In fact, if the boys are smart, they make it look very serious, so they can play with the toys at work too. That’s when remote control toys start being called UAVs…

In this photo, visitors stand infront of LOOLTV Camera Defense System models on display at the UVID 2014 Conference, at Airport city, by Ben Gurion International Airport, central Israel, on Sept. 17, 2014

UVID or Unmanned Vehicles Israel Defense is an Israeli defense initiative to provide information about Israel’s air, sea, and ground unmanned systems.

Sure it is, or maybe it’s a super cool toy show for adults.

Photo of the Day

Pentagon Official: U.S. Still Considering Drone Sale to Turkey

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

U.S. sales of drones to Turkey are still under consideration.

“The United States continues to work through our approach to exporting unmanned systems to our closest allies, including Turkey,” a Pentagon official told JTA on Tuesday.

The official would not comment directly on reports originating in the Turkish press that the Obama administration had canceled the sale of 10 Predator drones to Turkey in retaliation for Turkey’s alleged exposure to Iran of 10 operatives working for Israeli intelligence.

A spokesman for the State Department, which finalizes such sales, also would not comment, citing the policy of not making such sales public until Congress had been notified.

The drones each cost at least $4.5 million.

JTA

Israel’s Arms Exports Soar to record $7.5 Billion

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Israel’s increasing arms exports has made it one of the most important in the world, with a record $7.5 billion worth of arms exported in 2012, according to a Minister of Defense’s Export and Cooperation report on Tuesday.

The new record is even more impressive when taking into account budget cuts in Western countries.

“The figure of $7.47 billion in defense exports at the end of last year surprised us,” said the export corporation’s director Shmaya Avieli. “Israel is one of the top ten defense exporters in the world, and one of the top five exporters according to some criteria. We are in the premier league in this area, and we aspire to more because defense exports contribute to Israel’s economy and security.”

Countries in Asia and in the Pacific region were the main markets, where sales totaled $4 billion last year.

The most popular export items were radar, missiles, defense systems that include anti-aircraft weapons, observation and communications systems, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Israel is the world’s largest exporter of UAVs after the United States.

 

Jewish Press News Briefs

What Can Happen on a School Trip?

Sunday, April 28th, 2013

My daughter Aliza had a school trip these past two days. It’s an Israeli thing – something I have always loved. They…we…take our children to the land; to see the amazing places, sites, views. This year, they took them on an overnight trip to Haifa. She came back dirty, exhausted, starving. She showed me the pictures she took – the coast of Haifa and the mountains, the flowers…

The first thing she wanted – after food – was to show me the pictures. She was so excited. She and her friends posed for each other – and, “I can totally see you in me,” she said.

It’s strange to hear a child say that – that she can see me in the pictures of her. Listening, not just to what she said, but the order in which she said them, convinced me yet again that the mind of a 13 year old is a most amazing thing.

She started with what was special to her – but, as you’ll see – pretty much the opposite of how a parent would rank the events of the trip. To her, it was about what she saw, what she did. To me, it became more of a national identity, more of an example of the politics that can affect our lives in the strangest of ways.

One day last week, I had a normal business day – telephone calls with clients, two potential new projects, firming up plans to speak at a conference in England in June (wow…okay, that’s not normal for me), two meetings, and then shopping.

Somewhere late in the day, I heard about the drone from Lebanon being shot down. It was all background noise.

Aliza came home well into the night, anxious to talk, to tell me about the last two days of her life. Her trip unfolded before me in a combination of complaint and wonder. She enjoyed the beach; hated where they slept. She liked the flowers; hated the food. She slept in a tent and she was FREEZING. And the food, back to the food.

“It was disgusting. There were ants in the bread,” she told me.

To which, her 17 year old brother responded, “That’s good, we had cockroaches.” (…which I sincerely hope is not true).

She began by telling me that the girls were given the choice of two hikes – either the “easy” one or the “hard” one. Those that took the hard one were rewarded with ices. Those that took the easy one, got to enjoy time on the beach. Aliza chose the beach (if you have time, see A Candle and a Wave).

And as she was talking, it hit – hours ago. Mid-afternoon, she was on the beach. Near Haifa…where the Israeli air force shot down a drone that they believe was launched from Lebanon, probably intending to spy on Israel or, perhaps, worse.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s helicopter was flying north when the drone was identified. The first thing the air force did as it scrambled jets to intercept the drone was to order the prime minister’s helicopter out of the skies above Israel.

And while they were doing this – my daughter was not far. It clicked as she was talking about the beach – and when it was happening, in those moments when the Israel jets were flying and my daughter was there below…I had no clue, no warning, nothing.

Her mind had moved on to the next part of her trip…mine tripped behind. “Did you hear planes?” I asked her.

“Yes,” she replied.

“Did you hear a boom?” I asked her.

“No,” she answered.

She went back to the story of the beach, how clean and beautiful it was, how nice the water felt. She was amazed by the number of shells she found on the shore and complained that they were told that the shells were part of nature and protected.

They could take rocks and pieces of broken glass that had been smoothed over time by the sand, but they could not take any shells.

She sat on thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of shells as her friends took a picture and she told me about the magnificent view from the upper hills of Haifa.

And she told me about how she walked across a bridge and how it was so scary – another picture there as well.

And then, she told me about how an Arab driver had thrown rocks at the girls and how one was hit – or her friend said she was hit. And how the girl was crying on the phone when she spoke to her parents.

“Where was your guard?” I asked her – trying to get the story without showing her that I was getting more and more upset.

“He wasn’t a guard,” she answered, “he was a madrich (counselor)” – which is fine – he was armed. On with the story, my heart begged her.

“He was in the back.”

“What good does it do if he was only in the back?” I asked her. Dumb, I thought to myself – WHY am I asking a 13-year-old where the guard should be?

“There were two of them but only the one in the back had a gun, but they stopped the driver and they were talking to him.”

“Why didn’t they call the police?” I asked her. I have to tell you, getting the story from a 13 year old can be very frustrating.

From what I gather – the guards detained the Arab who had thrown the rocks but while they waited for the police, the driver left. The guards didn’t pull their guns and threaten – but then again, they were surrounded by about 60 young girls who kept coming over to their crying friend to ask if she was okay. So, all in all, their not pulling out their guns was probably a good thing. There’s no way of knowing what the Arab had done and it probably ended for the best. Though scared, Aliza’s classmate was not hurt – and yes, what about the next time? I don’t have an answer for that one.

The police did come and speak to the girls – no idea how the story ended other than that everyone is fine; Aliza is home safe, tired, dirty (taking a shower now) and looking forward to a LONG night of sleep.

It’s a funny thing to send your child on a school trip – what can happen right? You worry about them being cold or hungry. You worry about them not sleeping enough or perhaps falling during the hiking. Scrambled air force jets shooting down a drone; an Arab attacking them with rocks…that doesn’t cross your mind.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Paula R. Stern

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/a-soldiers-mother/what-can-happen-on-a-school-trip/2013/04/28/

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