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October 1, 2016 / 28 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘law’

Lebanese LGBT Activists Protest Anti-Homosexual Law

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Perhaps it’s a sign that Lebanon has become safer and more Western-oriented: a group of about 50 LGBT activists from the Lebanon-based Helem association, for the first time in four years staged a sit-in outside the Hbeish police station in Beirut, where the “morality police” hold transgressors of article 534 in the penal code which criminalizes relations that are “against nature,” Naharnet reported. The protesters demanded that the law be revoked, and that four transgender women be released. They carried signs saying, “Homosexuality is not a disease,” “Sex is not illegal — your law is archaic,” and “Repeal 534.”

The punishment in Lebanon for “crimes against nature” is up to one year in prison.

An event that was scheduled to follow the demonstration, organized by Proud Lebanon, was canceled due to pressure from Christian religious authorities.

Helem leader Genwa Samhat told AFP that the sit-in, which took place two days before the International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, “calls for the abolition of this section of law dating from the (1920-1943) French mandate in Lebanon.” She added: “Most people arrested under this law aren’t detained in the act but in the street because of their appearance.” Also, she said, people “continue to be fired if their boss finds out they’re gay. They’re made to say they quit voluntarily for fear of being outed.”

According to Naharnet, Lebanese police are known to raid nightclubs serving homosexual patrons, and homosexuality is a frequent subject of ridicule on television.

In 2012 dozens demonstrated outside a Beirut court to protest the use of an anal “test” for suspected gay men. According to Samhat, “these tests continue, despite the justice ministry asking police to stop the practice. This is humiliating.” Also, she noted that “arrested people are still screened for AIDS, while this should be voluntary. There is a preconceived idea that all homosexuals have AIDS.”

Just to compare, the Boston Globe recently wrote that Tel Aviv, only 130 miles south of Beirut, is the gayest city on earth. “Tel Aviv is, for lack of a better description, super gay,” the paper’s Christopher Muther told his readers, adding, “The long-standing rule of thumb is that 10 percent of the population is gay, give or take. The estimate by officials in Tel Aviv is 25 percent of its population is gay.”

JNi.Media

Light a Fire, Go to Jail

Monday, May 16th, 2016

The Fire and Rescue Commissioner issued an emergency edict Monday (May 16, 2016) under the authority of the Ministry of Public Security, banning all campfires in the State of Israel.

It is forbidden to light a campfire – any fire in a field outside – from 9 am to 7 pm in Israel. The penalty for violating the ban is a fine of NIS 70,000 or up to six months in jail.

Campfire ban May 16 2016 Ministry of Public Security

Campfire ban May 16 2016 Ministry of Public Security

Hundreds of fires broke out around the country Sunday due to the hot and dry weather conditions in Israel. Approximately 400 fires broke out, the head of the Israel firefighters’ operations division told Israel Radio.

Firefighters battled a blaze near Moshav Mata near Beit Shemesh, and another one near the Jerusalem neighborhood of Pisgat Ze’ev on Sunday evening, the latter due to a firebombing attack by Arab terrorists.

Fires broke out at Kibbutz Harel near Latrun, and at the village of Ajur, also near Beit Shemesh, as well as at Kfar Yona, east of Netanya.

The heat wave is expected to continue at least until Tuesday.

Hana Levi Julian

Shaked to Mull Law Punishing Prostitution Clients, Stress Rehabilitation

Sunday, April 17th, 2016

Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked (Habayit Hayehudi) is putting together a team to examine the possibility of turning the purchase of prostitution services into a criminal offense, Ha’aretz reported Sunday. The team will include representatives of the ministries of social services, finance, internal security and the interior. The minister’s decision follows requests by MK Shuli Mualem (Habayit Hayehudi) and Zehava Galon (Meretz) who met with Shaked two weeks ago. The goal of the new legislation will be to help rehabilitate sex workers.

According to the current Israeli law, prostitution per se is not criminal, but the law criminalizes driving persons into prostitution, using underage persons as prostitutes and publicizing prostitution services. The current law does not offer automatic support to prostitutes who wish to seek rehabilitation, such as emergency housing, a hotline, and day centers. The new law will likely offer a much more generous package that will include a guaranteed minimum income, employment services, a rent stipend, educational options and medical and psychological aid, as well as legal support and help in maintaining a connection with offspring.

There are no current official figures on prostitution in Israel, but the estimates of NGOs operating in the field stand at upwards of 13,000 sex workers, both male and female, which puts the number of customers at an estimated 300,000 (assuming each prostitutes sees between 5 and 6 customers daily), which is 12% to 15% of the population—a figure similar to other industrial countries. The overall income from prostitution is therefore estimated at around $300 million annually.

Both MKs Mualem and Galon argue that the effort to fight prostitution so far by focusing only on the traffickers and pimps has not made a dent in the prostitution industry in Israel, and that it must be complemented by enforcement that would deter consumption and reduce the workforce, through rehabilitation. They say their proposed new law would defeat prostitution itself, and not merely the byproducts of human trafficking, pimping, and violence against women. “That’s why the proposed law deals with the central economic driver, the consumers,” they explained. They believe what’s needed is legislation that would also change the perception of sex workers from mere objects to real human beings, and deposit customers with the responsibility for the effects their actions have on the women.”

A poll conducted in 2013 by the ministries of social services and internal security and published a month ago, discovered that 54% of Israelis believe there should be legislation against customers of prostitution, while 36% object. But only 43% agreed that customers should be punished as criminals. 23% believed the sex workers should be punished, and 38% (42% of males, 34% of females) said prostitution should not be against the law in Israel.

JNi.Media

Justice Minister Wants More Jewish Law on Israel’s Books

Friday, December 18th, 2015

(JNi.media) Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked accused the Israeli courts of ignoring Jewish law and promised to set up a steering committee to promote implementing the principles of Jewish law in the Israeli legal system, Kippa reported. “As is well known, in practice the courts are ignoring the legislature and the spirit of the law, and rarely draw inspiration from Jewish law, both in statutory interpretation and in filling lacunae in the law,” said Shaked, referring to the Foundations of Law legislation, enacted in the 1980s, directing the courts to rule on issues without a precedence according to “the principles of liberty, justice, integrity and peace of Jewish tradition.”

“They prefer to turn to foreign legal systems and not to Jewish law — which is the products of the best minds in our nation. It is regrettable and we must act to repair the damage,” said Shaked, who spoke at a special session of the Hotam Forum of Torah-based research foundations at the Ramada hotel in Jerusalem Wednesday.

Shaked added that “Jewish law, the masterpiece of Jewish creativity for 2,000 years, is yet to acquire its permanent station in our legal system, probably mainly due to a lack of knowledge about it,” and said that she believes “Jewish law can and must be a link between the values ​​of the past and the present values ​​and needs, not only on the declarative level. To me this link seems essential to the State of Israel as a Jewish state. ”

Shaked cited laws passed by the Knesset such as the Law of the Guards, the Facilitation of Rehabilitation ‏‏‏‏Act, the Do not stand over your fellow’s blood (good Samaritan) law, and the law of the dying, noting that they “were deeply influenced by Jewish law and prove that the link is possible and yields fine fruit.”

Shaked qualified her statements by saying that she does not intend for Jewish halakha to become Israel’s law, saying “obviously we can’t copy verbatim the norms that have been formulated in exile without sovereignty and independence, onto the reality of the Israeli legal system. Our society is not a community but a state, and the socioeconomic reality has changed completely regarding the status of women, the rights of employees, etc. My call is not for a mechanical imposition of Jewish law, but for true and brave dialogue between the Israeli law and our cultural and national sources.”

JNi.Media

Upgraded Counter Terrorism Bill Passes First Knesset Reading

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

An upgraded counter terrorism law passed its first reading Thursday in the Knesset plenum.

Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked (Bayit Yehudi) sponsored the bill. She told journalists it was intended to provide authorities with the many tools needed to “lead an effective battle against terrorist organizations, both in fighting their expanding activities and the funding that enables such activity.

“We believe that passing the Terror Act, in its current version is a necessary and vital step to advance the fight against terror,” she said. “In this fight, there is no ‘Left’ and ‘Right,’” she emphasized.

The proposal for the bill was formulated originally during the term of former justice minister Tzipi Livni. It gathers all current legislation dealing with counter terrorism into one measure, and broadens the definition of what constitutes a terrorist organization.

Under the new law, administrative detentions will be legalized, and those who support terrorism will receive up to three years’ imprisonment. The definition of terror support will include posting praises of terrorism online, waving flags connected with terror activity, etc.

In addition, accomplices to such crimes will receive the same penalties as perpetrators.

The maximum prison term will be raised to 30 years for terror-related crimes as well.

The notes of explanation that accompany the legislation point out: “The legislation’s objective is to give state authorities the proper legal, criminal and public tools to deal with the terror threats the State of Israel is facing… This is due to the unique nature of this type of crime, which is reflected in the severity of the infringement, on the one hand, and the difficulty of fighting it because of its scope and complexity on the other hand.”

The measure passed by a vote of 45-14.

It now moves to the Knesset Constitution, Law and Justice Committee for amendments and changes prior to a second and third, final reading.

Hana Levi Julian

Minister Uri Ariel: Keep Administrative Detention for ‘Time Bombs’

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Hunger-striking Palestinian Islamic Jihad administrative detainee prisoner Mohammed Alla’an is still in very serious condition at Barzilai Medical Center, but is not being force-fed, and technically he is free at this time.

The High Court of Justice has suspended his administrative detention after it became clear that his medical condition had deteriorated and he had caused himself brain damage as a result of refusing food for more than 60 days.

Attorneys for the suspected terrorist and for the state have been debating over what has been the core cause of Alla’an’s condition — his hunger strike or the administrative detention that led him to refuse food in a bid for freedom.

Few are pointing to the behavior that led to the administrative detention in the first place, in part because the evidence has not been made public.

Agriculture Minister Uri Ariel told Galei Tzahal Army Radio in an interview this morning (Aug. 20) he opposes the use of administrative detention except for when the suspect can be classified as a “ticking time bomb.”

“The State of Israel resorts to the practice of administrative detentions too easily and too often,” Ariel said. “It should only be used in cases in which there is an imminent threat of an attack.”

Ariel said the state, rather than the High Court, has mishandled the current situation with the hunger-striking Alla’an.

“My problem is not with the High Court of Justice,” the minister said. “It’s the fact that the representatives of the state don’t force-feed him and make sure that [Allan] stays alive.”

“They can’t find any doctor in the entire country willing to force-feed him,” Ariel said. “It boggles the mind. The situation that has been created is more than strange.”

Hana Levi Julian

Ministerial Committee Approves Tougher Stand on Stone Throwers

Monday, June 1st, 2015

The Knesset’s Ministerial Committee for Legislation approved a bill on Sunday (May 31) proposed by Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked to increase the severity of the punishment for stone throwing. The bill, initially proposed by the previous justice minister, Tzipi Livni, will amend the existing law to cover cases in which the stone thrower’s intent to inflict casualties cannot be proven – as in cases of attacks on buses or police vehicles, when the aim may be “merely” to harass or draw attention. Shaked’s aim is to diminish the current disparity between the maximum punishment stipulated by law (20 years) and the relatively light sentences given in practice – a result of the difficulty in proving intent. The new bill will make it possible to convict stone throwers without proving their intent to injure; the penalty in these cases will be up to 10 years in prison.

Written by Ben Niran

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/ministerial-committee-approves-tougher-stand-on-stone-throwers/2015/06/01/

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