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September 18, 2014 / 23 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Light Rail’

4 Terror Attacks in 12 Hrs – Jerusalem Light Rail to Avoid Shuafat

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Security officials have decided enough is enough: four terror attacks on the Jerusalem Light Rail in 12 hours has ended the route through the capital’s northern neighborhood of Shuafat, at least for now.

Jerusalem Arab terrorists hurled firebombs and rocks at the Jerusalem Light Rail in two separate attacks in less than an hour on Monday night as the train passed through the capital’s Arab neighborhood of Shuafat. Two other attacks occurred earlier in the day.

Passengers instinctively ducked, and mothers with babies threw themselves down on to the floor of the train, some of them bursting into tears, according to witnesses quoted by the Hebrew-language 0404 website.

Miraculously, no one on the train was physically injured, although passengers were traumatized and the train itself was damaged in each of the attacks.

One of the passengers in the second attack of the day told 0404, “Suddenly the train was hit by two flaming firebombs… there was great panic and mothers laid down with their babies on the floor of the train. It is absolutely surreal, what we are going through here. Just unbelievable.”

The website noted that three masked Arab terrorists  hurled rocks at another Light Rail train during the first attack of the day.

Depending on size, the CityPass firm that runs the Light Rail must pay NIS 3,000 to NIS 5,000 to replace each window smashed by terrorists hurling rocks and firebombs at the train. Insurance does not cover the cost of replacing equipment damaged in terrorist attacks.

Arab rioters in Shuafat completely destroyed the infrastructure three Jerusalem Light Rail stations in the area at the start of Operation Protective Edge, preventing the train from passing through the neighborhood for a number of days. As it did then, the line will operate — at least temporarily — between Mount Herzl and Ammunition Hill, with the route ending at Ammunition Hill.

The northern Jerusalem neighborhoods of Shuafat, Beit Hanina, Pisgat Ze’ev and Neve Yaakov will thus be deprived of service due to Arab terrorism in Shuafat.  Jews live in at least two of the four neighborhoods, with a Jewish section recently having started in a third neighborhood as well.

Arabs Riot in Northern, Eastern Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

An undercover police officer narrowly escaped death Wednesday as an Arab mob tried to lynch him in the Shuafat refugee camp in northern Jerusalem.


The officer was discovered in the heat of Arab riots following the murder of an Arab teenager, Muhammad Abu Khdeir,  overnight between Tuesday and Wednesday. Abu Khdeir’s charred body was found in the Jerusalem forest at about 5:00 a.m., about an hour after police received a call from his parents reporting him missing. The boy, a 17 year old resident of Shuafat, was allegedly kidnapped from nearby Beit Hanina.

The discovery sparked riots by Arabs in northern Jerusalem Arab neighborhoods such as Shuafat and Beit Hanina, who claimed the murderers were Jews avenging the murders of Eyal Yifrah, Gil-Ad Sha’ar and Naftali Fraenkel.

Israeli leaders, including Minister Uri Ariel (Jewish Home) and Yesha Council spokesman Dani Dayan, condemned the murder immediately.  “I vigorously condemn barbaric murder of boy in #Jerusalem. I am confident security forces will bring perpetrators to justice,” Tweeted Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat.

Large Scale Riots

Throughout Wednesday morning, residents clashed with police and security forces in Arab-majority neighborhoods around the city.  Light Rail service in the area was suspended as rioters hurled rocks and rolled burning tires at police. At least one person injured in the melee and taken to the hospital.

In the Old City Arab worshipers stoned security forces on the Temple Mount and threw rocks over the wall at the Western Wall plaza below. In response to the violence police closed the Mount to Jewish visitors, while leaving it open to the Muslims responsible for the violence.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld confirmed that no arrests have been made as a result of the clashes, but added that police would likely detain participants in the riots “soon. “It is likely there will be (arrests), following review of CCTV footage of the incident,” Rosenfeld told The Jewish Press. 

Rosenfeld added that the Temple Mount area has since quieted down, although riots are continuing in the Beit Hanina neighborhood.

Police are continuing their investigation of the circumstances that led to the murder of the young Arab teen, who sources requesting anonymity said may have been killed in a blood feud between two rival clans.

Terrorist Attacks on Light Rail in Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Arab terrorists hurled pipe bombs at the Jerusalem Light Rail Wednesday morning. One of the bombs exploded, but failed to injure any of the passengers. A second bomb did not detonate and was deactivated by sappers summoned to the scene by Israel Police officers.

Arabs continued throughout the morning to riot in the northern Jerusalem Arab neighborhoods of Shuafat, with violence spilling over into nearby Beit Hanina as well in response the death of a young Arab teen who was kidnapped from an Arab neighborhood in northern Jerusalem. His body, found in the Jerusalem forest at about 5:00 a.m., was burnt and showed other signs of violence, according to sources quoted by the Hebrew-language Ynet website.

Arabs in Shuafat burned tires, hurled explosives and rocks at IDF soldiers and Israel Police. They vandalized three Light Rail stations, smashing the glass and destroying the security cameras.

Authorities subsequently announced on Wednesday morning that the Jerusalem Light Rail would operate only between the Mount Herzl and the Givat Tachmoshet stops. The Beit Hanina and Shuafat stops are to be skipped until further notice.

Jerusalem Light Rail System Back in Operation but Woes Pile Up

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Jerusalem’s light rail system is back in operation for the first time since the “snowstorm of the century” shut it down and crippled the capital last Thursday, but the city’s problems are far from over.

Thousands of cars are blocked in by plowed snow, and pedestrians often walk in the middle of the street instead of on icy sidewalks, creating worse traffic jams than usual. However, the municipality’s parking police have no problem pounding the sidewalks to hand out parking tickets.

The entrance to Jerusalem from the Tel Aviv highway is heavily congested because of thousands of Israelis from “snowless” regions who have flocked to the city to get a glimpse of the white stuff, much of which now is black from car exhausts.

Parents are up in arms over a Jerusalem education official’s request to school principals that students help clear snow so that all schools can open.

Nurses and other hospital staff have been working 12-hour shifts to ease the problem of transportation, especially in the late evening and early morning when streets are icy.

Life in Jerusalem: Delays on the Light Rail

Thursday, April 18th, 2013

For those of us who travel in Jerusalem and use public transportation, the lightrail is now something we’ve totally gotten used to.  Most of us have relearned bus routes which had been changed and amputated when the route followed the train for too much of it. We do our best to keep our little yellow rechargeable Rav Kav ticket with plenty of rides magically tucked inside. We also learned how to quickly and efficiently pay immediately when entering the train before any inspector could stop us.

The train is so popular, there are many times of the day when even at one of the earliest stops in the route in Pisgat Ze’ev there are no empty seats.  And in the center of Jerusalem, on Jaffa Road, the train is frequently as crowded as the NYC subway at rush hour.

An advantage during Jerusalem rush hour is that it runs on tracks and doesn’t get stuck in traffic.  Well, honestly, that isn’t so true.  There’s a place in the Beit Chanina/Shuafat Arab neighborhood in Jerusalem where I’ve found myself more than once in a train that can’t move at all.

Cars turning onto the road which is parallel to the tracks get stopped by a red light in the distance.  The junction at which they are turning doesn’t go red quickly enough.

Last week, when I was on the train and standing in the very front, behind the driver, I heard another passenger saying

“Watch, the driver has a camera.  He’s going to take a picture of the cars licenses  blocking him. And then those drivers get one thousand (1,000) shekel fines.”

And yes, the driver did take out a smartphone, and he took pictures of the cars in front and their license plates.  Hopefully this should keep people from trying to sneak past the light when it’s turning red.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Beinart Lies About the Jerusalem Light Rail

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

More mendacious propaganda at Open Zion, Peter Beinart’s weapon of words bunker:

One of the only mixed modes of transportation in Israel is the Jerusalem Light Rail—which, as it was originally built to connect surrounding Israeli settlements to central Jerusalem, is hardly equally inclusive to Palestinians. Historically, when the light rail system was first constructed, it uprooted several Palestinian neighborhoods, further displacing many Palestinians who once lived in Jerusalem. Now, though the train passes through several traditionally Arab neighborhoods, the stations are named in Hebrew rather than Arabic. A. The light rail does not connect “Israeli settlements.” It connects the Jerusalem neighborhoods of Neveh Yaakov and Pisgat Ze’ev and French Hill. (By the way, Neveh Yaakov was attacked, destroyed and ethnically cleansed of its Jews by Arabs in late 1947). B. No “Palestinian neighborhoods” were uprooted. That is simply untrue.

C.  The stations are name in Hebrew, yes.  That is the language of the country.  However, Arab place names are also voiced out over the loudspeaker.  For example, Damascus Gate (in English), Sha’ar Shchem (in Hebrew) and Bab El-Amud in Arabic.  The stops in Arab-populated neighborhoods are sounded off as Bet Hanina and Shuafat and Es-Sahil in all languages with no special Hebrew alteration.  Shimon HaTzaddik, though, is not called Sheikh Jarrah.  (Shimon HaTzaddik neighborhood was also ethnically cleansed of its Jews in early 1948).

D.  The Light Rail was originally built to ease mass transportation problems and then, to avoid charges that the city’s Arab population would be discriminated against, tracks were purposefully laid through those neighborhoods.

The writer is a liar.

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Train Nice

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Living in Israel is often a study on kindness between people. There are little things that people do that cost them nothing, or cost them very little and yet they make that extra effort that results in someone feeling so good. I had two meetings today in the center of Jerusalem. It was silly to take the car and so I parked it at a park-and-ride lot near the train station.

As I walked to the train, pulling out my magnetic card – a woman handed me a one-ride ticket. In Jerusalem, when you pay for the train, the ticket is good for 90 minutes. During that time, you can hop on the train, hop off and grab a bus, likely even another one. She obviously was finished with her ride and heading back to her car but instead of tossing the card in the garbage, she handed it to the first person in her path…me.

I got on the train and rode it to my stop – for free.

Although that wasn’t the intention when they started it, and perhaps I am rationalizing, I don’t consider it stealing. Plus, months ago, I had gone on the light rail train with Aliza – and wanted to take that second ride after we’d stopped in the center of town for a few minutes on our way to the Old City. The first train dropped us off; we ran our quick errand and then waited more than 40 minutes for the train. It was raining; it was when the train first started and it was running very slowly. We saw four trains going in the opposite direction – the one in our direction only came 5 minutes AFTER the tickets had expired.

Considering that the trains were supposed to run every 10 minutes and taking into account the fact that there is only ONE train line, we were astounded that FOUR trains had gone one way and not one had returned.

So, today, I feel like maybe the train gave me back one of those tickets but more than that, yet again, a woman reached out to help a stranger. I truly love this city…

Originally published Sunday at the blog, A Soldier’s Mother.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/a-soldiers-mother/train-nice/2013/02/19/

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