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Posts Tagged ‘Light Rail’

Terrorist Attacks on Light Rail in Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Arab terrorists hurled pipe bombs at the Jerusalem Light Rail Wednesday morning. One of the bombs exploded, but failed to injure any of the passengers. A second bomb did not detonate and was deactivated by sappers summoned to the scene by Israel Police officers.

Arabs continued throughout the morning to riot in the northern Jerusalem Arab neighborhoods of Shuafat, with violence spilling over into nearby Beit Hanina as well in response the death of a young Arab teen who was kidnapped from an Arab neighborhood in northern Jerusalem. His body, found in the Jerusalem forest at about 5:00 a.m., was burnt and showed other signs of violence, according to sources quoted by the Hebrew-language Ynet website.

Arabs in Shuafat burned tires, hurled explosives and rocks at IDF soldiers and Israel Police. They vandalized three Light Rail stations, smashing the glass and destroying the security cameras.

Authorities subsequently announced on Wednesday morning that the Jerusalem Light Rail would operate only between the Mount Herzl and the Givat Tachmoshet stops. The Beit Hanina and Shuafat stops are to be skipped until further notice.

Jerusalem Light Rail System Back in Operation but Woes Pile Up

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Jerusalem’s light rail system is back in operation for the first time since the “snowstorm of the century” shut it down and crippled the capital last Thursday, but the city’s problems are far from over.

Thousands of cars are blocked in by plowed snow, and pedestrians often walk in the middle of the street instead of on icy sidewalks, creating worse traffic jams than usual. However, the municipality’s parking police have no problem pounding the sidewalks to hand out parking tickets.

The entrance to Jerusalem from the Tel Aviv highway is heavily congested because of thousands of Israelis from “snowless” regions who have flocked to the city to get a glimpse of the white stuff, much of which now is black from car exhausts.

Parents are up in arms over a Jerusalem education official’s request to school principals that students help clear snow so that all schools can open.

Nurses and other hospital staff have been working 12-hour shifts to ease the problem of transportation, especially in the late evening and early morning when streets are icy.

Life in Jerusalem: Delays on the Light Rail

Thursday, April 18th, 2013

For those of us who travel in Jerusalem and use public transportation, the lightrail is now something we’ve totally gotten used to.  Most of us have relearned bus routes which had been changed and amputated when the route followed the train for too much of it. We do our best to keep our little yellow rechargeable Rav Kav ticket with plenty of rides magically tucked inside. We also learned how to quickly and efficiently pay immediately when entering the train before any inspector could stop us.

The train is so popular, there are many times of the day when even at one of the earliest stops in the route in Pisgat Ze’ev there are no empty seats.  And in the center of Jerusalem, on Jaffa Road, the train is frequently as crowded as the NYC subway at rush hour.

An advantage during Jerusalem rush hour is that it runs on tracks and doesn’t get stuck in traffic.  Well, honestly, that isn’t so true.  There’s a place in the Beit Chanina/Shuafat Arab neighborhood in Jerusalem where I’ve found myself more than once in a train that can’t move at all.

Cars turning onto the road which is parallel to the tracks get stopped by a red light in the distance.  The junction at which they are turning doesn’t go red quickly enough.

Last week, when I was on the train and standing in the very front, behind the driver, I heard another passenger saying

“Watch, the driver has a camera.  He’s going to take a picture of the cars licenses  blocking him. And then those drivers get one thousand (1,000) shekel fines.”

And yes, the driver did take out a smartphone, and he took pictures of the cars in front and their license plates.  Hopefully this should keep people from trying to sneak past the light when it’s turning red.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Beinart Lies About the Jerusalem Light Rail

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

More mendacious propaganda at Open Zion, Peter Beinart’s weapon of words bunker:

One of the only mixed modes of transportation in Israel is the Jerusalem Light Rail—which, as it was originally built to connect surrounding Israeli settlements to central Jerusalem, is hardly equally inclusive to Palestinians. Historically, when the light rail system was first constructed, it uprooted several Palestinian neighborhoods, further displacing many Palestinians who once lived in Jerusalem. Now, though the train passes through several traditionally Arab neighborhoods, the stations are named in Hebrew rather than Arabic. A. The light rail does not connect “Israeli settlements.” It connects the Jerusalem neighborhoods of Neveh Yaakov and Pisgat Ze’ev and French Hill. (By the way, Neveh Yaakov was attacked, destroyed and ethnically cleansed of its Jews by Arabs in late 1947). B. No “Palestinian neighborhoods” were uprooted. That is simply untrue.

C.  The stations are name in Hebrew, yes.  That is the language of the country.  However, Arab place names are also voiced out over the loudspeaker.  For example, Damascus Gate (in English), Sha’ar Shchem (in Hebrew) and Bab El-Amud in Arabic.  The stops in Arab-populated neighborhoods are sounded off as Bet Hanina and Shuafat and Es-Sahil in all languages with no special Hebrew alteration.  Shimon HaTzaddik, though, is not called Sheikh Jarrah.  (Shimon HaTzaddik neighborhood was also ethnically cleansed of its Jews in early 1948).

D.  The Light Rail was originally built to ease mass transportation problems and then, to avoid charges that the city’s Arab population would be discriminated against, tracks were purposefully laid through those neighborhoods.

The writer is a liar.

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Train Nice

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Living in Israel is often a study on kindness between people. There are little things that people do that cost them nothing, or cost them very little and yet they make that extra effort that results in someone feeling so good. I had two meetings today in the center of Jerusalem. It was silly to take the car and so I parked it at a park-and-ride lot near the train station.

As I walked to the train, pulling out my magnetic card – a woman handed me a one-ride ticket. In Jerusalem, when you pay for the train, the ticket is good for 90 minutes. During that time, you can hop on the train, hop off and grab a bus, likely even another one. She obviously was finished with her ride and heading back to her car but instead of tossing the card in the garbage, she handed it to the first person in her path…me.

I got on the train and rode it to my stop – for free.

Although that wasn’t the intention when they started it, and perhaps I am rationalizing, I don’t consider it stealing. Plus, months ago, I had gone on the light rail train with Aliza – and wanted to take that second ride after we’d stopped in the center of town for a few minutes on our way to the Old City. The first train dropped us off; we ran our quick errand and then waited more than 40 minutes for the train. It was raining; it was when the train first started and it was running very slowly. We saw four trains going in the opposite direction – the one in our direction only came 5 minutes AFTER the tickets had expired.

Considering that the trains were supposed to run every 10 minutes and taking into account the fact that there is only ONE train line, we were astounded that FOUR trains had gone one way and not one had returned.

So, today, I feel like maybe the train gave me back one of those tickets but more than that, yet again, a woman reached out to help a stranger. I truly love this city…

Originally published Sunday at the blog, A Soldier’s Mother.

Jerusalem’s Light Rail train is Not Segregated

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

During my visit to the British Parliament last week, I heard concern from a number of members that Jerusalem’s new light rail system was built as a “tool of Israel’s apartheid.” This type of claim can leave one baffled; where do you start explaining when an intelligent elected official hits you with a claim that is so totally off base? Aside from the issue of priorities, with people being killed daily by the Assad  regime Syria, it is the height of hypocrisy for world leaders to ignore that massacre and waste their time and effort in seeking out something to pin on Israel.

The city of Jerusalem was first declared the capital of the united Kingdom of Israel by our mighty King David some 3000 years ago. At its center, on Mount Moriah, David’s son Solomon built the Temple, which became a place of gathering for the entire nation of Israel three times a year. Ever since, this city has been the focal point of Jewish prayer around the world. In Israel’s War of Independence in 1948, part of the city was captured by the British-trained Arab Legion of Trans-Jordan, which held the city for 19 years, until it was again united in the miraculous Six Day War of June, 1967. During the 19 years of Jordan’s illegal occupation of Jerusalem, Jews were barred from access to the city’s holy sites. Jewish doctors and nurses were massacred while trying to reach the Hadassah Hospital, located on then-isolated Mount Scopus.

Only after Israel’s Defense Forces reunited the holy city were members of all religions again allowed access to their holy sites (aside from the Temple Mount, which maintains limited access for non-Muslims).

Jerusalem today is a city with total population of about 760,000 people – about 65% Jewish, and the remaining 35% comprised of Muslims, Christians, and others. Anyone who visits the city will see a mix of people from all ethnic backgrounds and all religions partaking in all aspects of the city’s culture and commerce. Like it or not, apartheid is not a fitting description for the reality of Jerusalem today.

The city of Jerusalem, capital of the State of Israel, incorporated its light rail public transportation system late last year. The light rail is intended to relieve traffic congestion, and spare the city from the air pollution emitted from the cars and buses that it will replace.

Three years of its construction were very bothersome to the residents of and visitors to Jerusalem because it made transit within the city even more difficult and slowed traffic, with many roads closed and much traffic redirected. When the work was finally completed, I believe that most of Jerusalem was happy with the results.

The light rail is now 14 KM long with 23 stops. It starts in the Pisgat Zev neighborhood in the north and runs though Beit Hannia and Shuafat, passes by the Old City through the center of town, runs along Jaffa Street past the central bus station and ends at Mount Herzl.

The track passes though and stops in both Jewish and Arab neighborhoods. I have taken the train and noticed that both Jews and Arabs are regular commuters. All of the train’s signs, tickets, ticket machines, and public announcements are made very clearly in both Hebrew and Arabic. Signs of station names are posted in both Hebrew and Arabic.

Knowing the facts firsthand, it is strange for me to hear discussions in British Parliament about the light rail being segregated and a “tool of apartheid.” Why, I ask, do people buy into such baseless libel and propaganda?

First major injury from Jerusalem Light Rail

Monday, November 28th, 2011

The Jerusalem Light Rail had it first major accident this morning involving a pedestrian. An elderly man  was standing on the tracks when the Light Rail, unable to stop in time, hit him. The severely injured man was taken to the hospital. No other details are known at this time.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/first-major-injury-from-jerusalem-light-rail/2011/11/28/

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