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May 30, 2015 / 12 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘modi’in’

Haredim Blocks Roads in Protest of Draft

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

Haredim took to the streets Monday morning to protest the arrest of four yeshiva students who refused to report to the IDF draft center after receiving orders to enlist.

Protesters blocked traffic in Jerusalem, Modi’in and Ashdod before police dispersed them and arrest more than a dozen demonstrators.

There were no serious injuries.

Police Close Case, False Alarm on Possible Missing Child Near Modi’in

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Update 9:45 PM – Israel Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld reports that no parent has reported any missing child, nor has any complaint been filed indicating that a child has not come home. The case has been closed and the search has been terminated. Thank God, this time it was a false alarm.

Update: 6:00 PM – No parents have reported any missing children. Police are continuing the search, just in case.


After receiving a phone call on Monday afternoon, Israeli Police are investigating whether a 10 year old child was seen in the back of a suspicious vehicle in the area of Modi’in, in the central region.

Police are not sure of the accuracy of the call, but they are not taking any chances. Spokesman Micky Rosenfeld emphasized that no report of a missing child has been received at any precinct and no official complaint filed by any parent.

Police and security forces are actively searching even though it is not yet clear whether or not the report is 100 percent valid. Nevertheless, the search is continuing just in case, Rosenfeld said, adding that it would not end until a security assessment determined that it was safe to do so.

When would that be? “I don’t know,” he replied. The spokesman told TheJewishPress.com that police now receive 10 to 12 of these calls each day.

Helicopters are scrutinizing the area from the skies and roadblocks have been erected on all the streets and major arteries, throwing a dragnet around the area.

The Jewish city of Mod’in is situated next to Highway 443, which leads directly towards the Palestinian Authority capital of Ramallah, located in Samaria. It is also close to Route 446, near the Shilat Junction, which leads to Samaria (Shomron) as well.

Boys to be Buried Side by Side

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Eyal Yifrach, Gil-ad Shaar and Naftali Frenkel HY”D will be buried side by side in the Modiin Cemetery today, Tuesday, in a joint funeral.

At the moment the schedule is as follows:

Eyal Yifrah’s funeral will begin at 2:30 PM, in the Beit Knesset Neria shul in Elad,. The burial will be at 5:30 PM in the Modi’in cemetery.

Gil-ad Shaar’s funeral will begin at 3:00 PM, in the Talmon shul, and they will leave to the cemetery at 4:30 PM.

Naftali Frenkel’s funeral will begin at 3:00 PM in Nof Ayalon, and the burial will be at the same time, in Modiin, at 5:30 PM.

The bodies of the kidnapped boys were found yesterday. They were kidnapped on June 12 by terrorists from Hebron, and murdered soon after.

Modi’in: the Next Big Thing in Israel Housing

Sunday, March 2nd, 2014

The city of Modi’in has long since stopped being considered a suburb of Tel Aviv. The rising demand for housing has managed to shorten the gap in real estate prices in both cities. Statistics published by the finance ministry last month also indicate that prices are on the rise. Within a year, housing costs in the city will climb 11 percent.

Modi’in has had its fair share of “birth pangs” before it became what it is today. As early as the 1950s, urban planners were eager to transform this strip of land replete with dry valleys into a city, in order to establish population centers away from the coast.

Those plans, however, were put on hold by various governments who instead sought to earmark the area for other needs, whether it be headquartering state and government agencies, relocating a large cemetery that would serve central Israel, or relocating the large garbage dump from the nearby city of Rehovot.

These deliberations and discussions rendered the rocky hills of Modi’in barren. Nonetheless, the goal of establishing a city in the area was never abandoned, and was rekindled in the 1960s and 70s, initially to sustain security and defense considerations. Still, those intentions failed to propel the planning process forward.

It was only in the mid-1980s when the decision to build Modi’in in earnest was finally made. What tilted the scales in favor of building was the housing shortage triggered by the massive immigration of Jews from the Soviet Union. In December 1985, the government needed to find a housing solution as waves of Jews were coming over. The most immediate one was Modi’in. In the early 1990s, the plans were approved, and in 1996 the first residents began moving in.

Ashdar's Deputy CEO for Marketing Racheli Brizel. Photo: Sivan Farge.

Ashdar’s Deputy CEO for Marketing Racheli Brizel. Photo: Sivan Farge.

“The situation today is not that much different from what it was in the early 1990s,” says construction giant Ashdar’s Deputy CEO for Marketing Racheli Brizel. “The government’s strong desire to flood the country with available properties and create an impact on housing prices led it to sign an agreement in which it promised to market 12,000 new housing units in the city, available housing in the center of the country.”

Modi’in lies within Israel’s central region, located atop the hills of Judea, between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. The city was planned to one day become a major metropolis. Its municipal administration came about by the merger of two neighboring suburbs, Reut and Maccabim. Today, Modi’in has 82,000 residents. The population is expected to hit 120,000 within the next few years. Within a 10-year period, Modi’in will be home to a quarter-million residents.

If construction and building plans are any indication, it would appear that Modi’in is making giant strides toward this goal. The latest government plan calls for the construction of 11,800 residential units in the four main neighborhoods of the city. From now until February 2015, some 3,200 apartments will be offered on the market. The rest of the apartments will become available between 2015 and 2017.

While there is reason for optimism, some are expressing many doubts as to whether this will have the desired impact on real estate prices in the city.

“More than 1,700 apartments were offered on the market over the course of the last six years in Modi’in,” says Brizel. “Every tender that was announced has been higher than the previous one. The movement in the real estate market was what prompted the company to make the decision to move into Modi’in and invest there, even with the high property values.”

Modi’in and Hashmonaim

Monday, November 25th, 2013

With Hanukkah beginning this week on Wednesday evening, Modi’in and the nearby settlement of Hashmonaim are appropriate choices for this week’s feature.

Hanukkah, which means the Festival of Dedication, celebrates the rededication of Jerusalem’s Holy Temple in the 2nd century BCE, following the triumph of a small band of Jews, led by the Maccabees, over the powerful Seleucid-Greek army. Under King Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Greeks had sought to impose their culture and erase any trace of Jewish observance.

The Maccabees hailed from the village of Modi’in, and the story of Hanukkah and the Maccabean Revolt took place in the Modi’in region and Jerusalem.

Modi’in, now a thriving city of 83,000 and fast-growing, is often referred to as the “Land of the Maccabees.”

Modi’in’s complete name, since 2003, is Modi’in-Maccabim-Re’ut, following its merger with the towns of Maccabim and Re’ut, which were founded in 1985 and 1987, respectively, and united into Maccabim-Re’ut in 1990.

“I find it positively inspiring to live where the Maccabees once lived. You can see for yourself the sites of their former presence, and it makes me feel even more committed to living in the historic Land of Israel,” said artist Leah Laker, a Modi’in resident.

Designed to preserve its natural landscape by renowned Canadian-Israeli architect Moshe Safdie, Modi’in, established in 1996, is a semi-suburban city surrounded by greenery. It includes many facilities and services for contemporary families, such as the ultra-modern Azrieli Mall.

Modi’in’s population consists of a well-integrated combination of religious and secular residents, including native Israelis and immigrants. They are mostly middle-class professionals, and many commute to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem; Modi’in lies midway between. As well, an industrial park in the north end of the city provides employment in high-tech and other fields.

The settlement of Hashmonaim, located two kilometers east of Modi’in, was named for the Hasmonean Dynasty, which was founded by the victorious Maccabees and ruled in Judea from 164 BCE to 63 BCE.

Established 26 years ago, Hashmonaim is known for its small-town, religiously traditional atmosphere.

More than 50 percent of the population is American, and thus it is not surprising that a baseball diamond lies at the entrance of this suburban paradise. The native Israelis and immigrants from other countries are more diverse, with a combination of Sephardic, Ashkenazic and Yemenite backgrounds.

Hashmonaim boasts lovely detached and semi-detached homes and includes entertainment and programming for children of all ages. Numerous amenities for families include modern playgrounds and diverse sports and music programs.

Modi’in, which caters to families who enjoy a city feel, and Hashmonaim, a blissful town in the center of Israel, are truly a blend of ancient Jewish history and world-class innovation.

Visit United with Israel.

Rock-Throwing Terrorists Return to Route 443

Monday, April 29th, 2013

Palestinian Authority Arabs Monday morning hurled rocks at motorists on Route 443, which connects Modi’in with Jerusalem, despite two checkpoints on the highway that also serves as alternate route to Highway 1 to Jerusalem.

No injuries were reported.

The Supreme Court three years ago ordered that the government open the road to Palestinian Authority drivers, ruling that security could be provided without prohibiting them from using the road. Terrorist attacks killed six people on Route 443 during the height of the Second Intifada, also known as the Oslo War, and the roads was closed to the PA in 2002.

Iron Dome Tested Near Jerusalem

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

The Iron Dome anti-missile defense system was tested near the city of Modi’in, located between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, before  being removed on Wednesday, Haaretz reported.

A battery stationed there would protect the Jerusalem area from rocket attacks. At least two rockets were fired from Gaza at Jerusalem during last November’s Operation Pillar of Defense, landing in open areas. One of them exploded close to an Arab village in Gush Etzion.

Iron Dome systems have been deployed throughout central Jerusalem for tests in recent days, according to reports.

Israel has five Iron Dome batteries, which have been stationed throughout the country as the need arises.

Last month, an Iron Dome battery stationed in the north was unusable for more than four weeks after sustaining flood damage in January. The battery was in storage when it flooded, damaging its electrical system, which has since been repaired and is now functional.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/iron-dome-tested-near-jerusalem/2013/02/27/

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