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August 21, 2014 / 25 Av, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
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Posts Tagged ‘Beer Sheva’

Home Front Command: No Festival in Be’er Sheva

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

Home Front Command instructed the Negev city of Be’er Sheva to cancel the Smilansky Festival scheduled for Wednesday night, and a festival that was scheduled for Friday in the Old City section of the city.

In addition, the population continues to be restricted to a maximum of 300 people at gatherings; summer camps, special education classes and kindergartens and day care programs are all closed for the rest of the week.

Be’er Sheva has been repeatedly targeted in missile fire by Hamas terrorists in Gaza due to its strategic position and a number of important sites within the city.

IDF Prepares to Raise the Heat with Operation Protective Edge in Gaza

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

Israel Defense Forces prepared for another long night Wednesday after security consultations held during the day at IDF Southern Command HQ in Be’er Sheva.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu met with Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon, IDF Chief of Staff Benny Gantz and GOC Southern Command Maj.-Gen. Sammy Turgeman in the Negev city, which has been hit repeatedly by Grad Katyusha missile fire from Gaza.

“We have decided to further increase the assault on Hamas and the terrorist organizations in Gaza,” Netanyahu said. “The IDF is prepared for all possibilities. Hamas will pay a heavy price for firing at Israel’s citizens.

“The security of Israel’s citizens is our primary consideration. Our military is strong, the home front is steadfast and our people are united. This combination is our response to the terrorist organizations that want to attack us.

“We are all united in the mission to strike at the terrorist organizations and restore quiet. The operation will be expanded and will continue until the firing at our communities stops and quiet is restored. I ask that the public continue to listen to the instructions from IDF Home Front Command – they save lives. On behalf of Israel’s citizens, I thank all IDF soldiers and Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet) intelligence personnel who are participating in the operation.”

By 8 pm, Israel had struck more than 160 targets during the day Wednesday in Gaza.

Iron Dome Knocks Out Missiles Over Be’er Sheva

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

The Iron Dome anti-missile system intercepted two Grad Katyusha missiles Tuesday afternoon over the Negev city of Be’er Sheva.

Residents in the area were warned at 14:33 they had about 60 seconds to race for shelter; shortly after, they heard a large “boom!” as two missiles were blown to bits in the air.

Falling shrapnel did not hurt anyone as the entire population had obeyed the instructions of Home Front Command and entered their safe spaces immediately when they heard the Color Red incoming rocket alert siren.

Grad Katyusha Missile Explodes in Be’er Sheva

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Gaza terrorists fired a Grad Katyusha missile at Be’er Sheva shortly before 11:00 a.m. local time on Monday.

The missile exploded in an open area on the outskirts of the city, known as the ‘capital of the southern region.’ No physical injuries and no property damage has been reported thus far.

Two similar missiles were fired at the city on Saturday as well; one was intercepted by the Iron Dome anti-missile system, which indicates it was headed for a populated area. The second landed in an open area and caused no property damage. No physical injuries were reported.

Nevertheless, the attacks cause a great deal of anxiety in the population and often trigger trauma attacks in numerous people as well. Mental health centers set up to treat those with post-traumatic stress syndrome report an uptick in the number of calls they have received in the past month due to the escalation in attacks from Gaza.

Despite the government’s promise to silence the rocket fire, Gaza terrorists have continued to escalate and widen the range of their attacks.

Mayors in the coastal cities of Ashdod and Ashkelon have cancelled children’s activities in public buildings that do not contain bomb shelters out of concern the participants may not be protected in the event of an attack.

Gazan Rockets Target Be’er Sheva

Saturday, July 5th, 2014

Dozens of rockets and mortars were launched at Israel over Shabbat as Hamas terrorists laugh at PM Netanyahu’s unfulfilled ultimatum.

Most of the rockets landed in the Eshkol region and Ofakim, but two reached as far as Be’er Sheva.

One of the rockets targeting Be’er Sheva was taken down by the Iron Dome system, the other fell in an open area.

A soldier was lightly injured by a mortar that landed in the Eshkol region.

The IAF struck some terror targets and missile launch sites, but these attacks have been ineffectual in convincing Gaza to stop the wave of rockets on Israel.

PM Netanyahu consulted with his security services on Saturday night, though it’s not clear why, since he already issued an ultimatum that has been blatantly dismissed by the enemy, and that he hasn’t followed through with.

Be’er Sheva hasn’t been targeted (or more accurately, reached) by Gazan missile, since 2012.

By not responding decisively and forcefully to the Gazan rockets, Israel is projecting weakness to Hamas, and further emboldening them, hence the increased rocket launches and attempts to hit cities even further away.

The city of Ashdod has cancelled school tomorrow for all educational centers without sufficient bomb shelters.

Video of Gazan rocket launched at Ashkelon:

Negev Loses Airport Night Trains

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Residents of southern Israel – particularly those living in the periphery communities in the Negev – will no longer have the option of taking the train to and from the airport after 11:00 p.m.

A spokesperson for Israel Railways told The Jewish Press on Thursday morning the service just didn’t pay for itself. “The government and the railway company made the decision together,” said the spokesperson, who added the figures totaled only an average of five or six riders per night on the line. “It wasn’t cost effective.”

Instead, it was decided the Metropoline Bus Service will take over the route, she said. Bus #469 will begin at the Arlozorov station in Tel Aviv and then make a stop at the airport, travel to Kiryat Gat and then go to the central bus station in Be’er Sheva.

That’s a solution for folks who live in the city of Be’er Sheva itself, perhaps – but what about those who live in the small periphery towns where bus service doesn’t exist overnight?

“Tough luck, baby,” said one consumer. “We’re stuck with paying hundreds of shekels for travel after 11 pm, just like we always have – and that after first spending hours traveling to the other cities just to get a little closer. Instead of paying NIS 600 to get home, I end up paying NIS 300 from Be’er Sheva, but spend three more hours after a 12-hour flight and another hour or more in baggage claims. Forget it.”

The Negev region comprises 60 percent of the nation’s land mass – but its travel network has yet to be developed to the point that even half of its communities have any access to railway service at all.

When asked why there is still no railway branch route to Arad, for example — while Dimona, a city of similar size and population, has had one for several years – the spokesperson for Israel Railways could not find a reason. Arad, a ‘clean air’ resort town located about 45 minutes east of Be’er Sheva and 25 minutes west of the Dead Sea, is in the midst of a major development boom due to the expansion of Route 31, which runs between the two points.

The Nevatim air base is located near Route 31 – described in Hebrew media as ‘death road’ due to the high number of motor vehicle fatalities that have occurred along the highway — as is the Nahal army base at Tel Arad.

A Lifetime of Achievement, From New York to Beer Sheva

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

Israel looked quite a bit different the first time Seymour Glick visited from his home in New York. The year was 1954, the population of Israel stood at just 1.7 million people and Glick had decided to use the summer between his third and fourth years of medical school to get to know the country that had been born just six years earlier. 

“I was 22 years old and I saw one of the truly great historic events – creating a new country after 2000 years, reviving a language, reclaiming the desert – taking place, right before my eyes,” Glick told The Jewish Press this week. “It was an amazing time, and I kept thinking about what I would be able to tell my grandchildren when they asked ‘what did you contribute to this.

Sixty years later, it’s a question Prof. Dr. Shimon Glick shouldn’t have too much trouble answering. Under his tutelage, the medical school at Ben Gurion University of the Negev has become a leading teaching hospital and research facility, as well as a backbone of medical support for the city of Beer Sheva. Before the age of 30 his research lab made a major breakthrough in the field of hormone isolation; that discovery, as well as his subsequent endocrinology research, has been cited in medical journals hundreds of times. 

In addition, Dr Glick used his platform as dean of the medical school to develop a curriculum in Jewish medical ethics, a field he says simply did not exist when he began his career. His insistence that top-flight medical researchers also have a responsibility to display compassionate bedside manner has made the school one of Israel’s most celebrated institutions. 

Oh yeah, and then there’s his family, well over 100 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, all living in Israel. The family is represented in nearly all communities of Israel: One son teaches in a Haredi yeshiva. Another, also a doctor, doubles as the head of an emergency room in Cleveland, Ohio and of the Efrat Emergency Medical Center, halfway between Jerusalem and Hebron. The centre has won accolades for providing quality medical care to local Jews and Arabs alike. Another son is an active member in the political struggle to force the government to protect Jews’ religious freedom on the Temple Mount. 

Nor has his involvement in Israeli society and the Jewish world been limited to the field of medicine. In the 1970s and 80s, Glick visited the Soviet Union multiple times, with a clear message to Soviet leaders and Jews alike: The world has not forgotten you. Since moving to Beer Sheva in 1974, his adopted hometown has recognised his volunteer activity in the city twice. He’s a perennial candidate for the Israel Prize. 

And yet, when meeting with Dr Glick there is little to indicate that one is speaking with an internationally renowned researcher or the emeritus dean of a prestigious medical school. In contrast to the heads of many university institutes or administrators, there are no leather chairs in his office, no large desk, no corner office with a view of the city.

Instead, Glick maintains a simple, spare office no larger than the researchers and doctors he has overseen since he founded the medical school in the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War. Most of the space in the room is occupied by bookshelves, packed dense with medical volumes – Jews & Medicine, Jewish & Catholic Bioethics, Pioneers in Jewish Medical Ethics. Ring binders hold research articles. 

As Glick prepared to accept the Nefesh B’Nefesh Bonei Tzion Award for Lifetime Achievement on Thursday, Jewish Press reporter Avi Tuchmayer met with him for an exclusive interview about his career, Israel, the medical profession and more. 

AT: You were 42 years old at top of your profession, recognised as one of the top doctors in the United States. What inspired you to drop it all and move to Israel? 

I first came to Israel as a medical student in 1954, for the summer between my third and fourth year in medical school. Spent a summer here, at Tel Hashomer, I don’t even remember coming through beer sheva.

Anyway, the Jewish Agency had a program that brought doctors to Israel, but they’d cancelled it for that year. So I contacted individual hospitals, Tel Hashomer said “come,” they gave me a room.  That’s when I decided to make Aliya. 

At that point, decided to make Aliya. It took another 20 years,but eventually we made it. 

What took 20 years?

Ah, there was always something coming up – a new job, a new research grant. I had to finish medical school, then an internship and a residency. 

In 1967 I came to volunteer after the Six Day War. At that time I was offered a job at Shaarei Zedek hospital in Jerusalem, to take over for the outgoing medical director, Prof. Dr. Shlezinger. It’s probably a smart thing I didn’t take it – I’m not sure I was ready at that time to run an Israeli hospital. It’s not easy now, with all I know. I knew I wasn’t ready to come yet.

So what happened that finally pushed the envelope and caused you to make the move? 

I heard that Ben Gurion University wanted to open a medical school – it would have been 1971 or 1972. I wrote to Professor Moshe Pryves, who was then head of the university and head of the medical school. Interestingly enough, Dr Pryves had written to me independently at the same time. Our letters crossed. He’d heard of me from a colleague.

Anyway, I received his invitation, came to look it over, and here I am. 

That was a tough time to make Aliya. Not too many people were interested in throwing their lot with Israel after the trauma of the Yom Kippur War.

Yes, it was a tough time to make aliya. Looking back, I don’t know how they opened the medical school at that time. There were money problems, half the students were in long-dan long-term miluim. But somehow we did it, I really don’t know how. But that’s why Israel works. If you don’t grab opportunity, then things simply don’t happen. 

Tell me about Israel in 1974.

Well, to start with, Beer Sheva then had 70,000 people. We’ve now got 200,000.

And how did the family adapt to Israel? 

What can I tell you, we were very well received. Financially, we were very fortunate: the Health Fund took care of us very well. For instance, There was an apartment building going up in town for the medical school, but the apartments there were not big enough for our family of six kids. So the Fund offered to give me 2 apartments; they broke down the wall between them and redesigned the inside to suit our family. That’s where we still live.

I also have to say that if you go to shul, you’re already at home, no matter where you are. You can drop into a shul in Milan, in Hong Kong, in South America, and people welcome you in. You get invited out, and you’re part of a community. People who come here without that sort of support network don’t understand that.  They go to absorption centres, but it isn’t the same. 

What was it like building a new medical school from scratch? 

Well, I came to new institution, so I could set a lot of the ground rules. We did a lot of things that simply weren’t done in traditional med schools – we introduced students to patients in their first year, for instance. That was as unheard of. Our admission procedure placed greater emphasis on our impressions of the applicant from our personal interview, rather than grades. 

We also administered the physician’s oath when a new class entered the school, rather than when they finished school. So there were a lot of unique factors about the school. What does it mean that the school is “community oriented”?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/a-lifetime-of-achievement-from-new-york-to-beer-sheva/2014/05/13/

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