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October 25, 2016 / 23 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘synagogue’

Jewish Suspect Arrested for Hate Crime Against Jerusalem Synagogue in Katamon

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

A suspect has been arrested on suspicion of spray-painting crosses on a synagogue wall in the Katamon neighborhood of Jerusalem during the night of Yom Kippur, a few hours after evening prayers.

A spokesperson for Jerusalem District Police said in a statement that an investigation has revealed the suspect is the same person who committed similar acts at the same synagogue several weeks ago.

The suspect is a 40-year-old Jewish resident of Jerusalem, police said, who is accused of spray-painting crosses in black paint on the walls of the synagogue on Rehov Yossi Ben Yo’ezar during Yom Kippur.

He was arrested Thursday and was brought to the Moriah police station for questioning.

A month ago nearly to the day, black crosses were spray-painted in a row across the front of the same Jerusalem synagogue on Rehov Yossi Ben Yo’ezer. Jerusalem District detectives and other forensic officers arrived on the scene, and at that time launched an investigation with Israel Police.

The suspect is to be arraigned in the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court after questioning.

Hana Levi Julian

Colorado Springs Synagogue to Relocate for Yom Kippur After Rosh Hashanah Fire

Saturday, October 8th, 2016

Chabad of Southern Colorado will hold its Yom Kippur services at the local Hotel Elegante in Colorado Springs, and are looking for alternative locations for their Sukkot and Simchat Torah, due to extensive fire damage to their synagogue.

Rabbi Moshe Liberow told KKTV that last Monday, just minutes before the congregation was to begin Rosh Hashanah services, they heard a loud bang and smelled smoke. While the congregation hastily made its way out of the building, Rabbi Liberow and a few of the congregants were able to get the Torah scrolls and prayer books out and took them to the rabbi’s home a few blocks away.

According to the KKTV report, the congregation may not be able to return to its building, as parts of the roof fell in and there’s extensive damage inside as well.

“Of course there’s been sadness, but sadness doesn’t bring growth, sadness doesn’t change things,” said Rabbi Liberow, stating: “We have to be optimistic, positive and, as our sages teach us, think good, be good, do good, increasing the goodness more and more.”

The Rabbi thanked the synagogue’s gentile neighbors for lending a hand in carrying damaged furniture and other articles out of the synagogue.


Security Guard Shot, Critically Wounded in Attack on Moscow Choral Synagogue

Saturday, October 1st, 2016

A security guard was shot by an assailant during an attack over the Sabbath at Moscow’s largest synagogue, the Moscow Choral Synagogue.

This is the same synagogue which then-Israeli Ambassador Golda Meir and the first official Israeli delegation to Russia visited and attended services during their posting to Moscow.

Interior of Moscow Choral Synagogue, Russia's largest and most prominent Jewish house of worship.

Interior of Moscow Choral Synagogue.

Svan Ivan Borisovich, age 40, arrived at the scene with a gun and a canister of flammable liquid during later afternoon prayers, according to Interfax, and attempted to enter the building with 150 worshipers inside, saying he was going to burn down the building.

The house of worship, located on Bolshoy Spasogolinschevsky Lane in central Moscow, is the largest and most prominent Jewish house of worship in Russia.

Security guards at the site blocked him from entering and attempted to take the man across the street, at which point he withdrew the gun and shot one of them. The guard sustained gunshot wounds in the head and chest.

The other guards overpowered the attacker and held him until police arrived and arrested him. The wounded guard was rushed to a hospital, where he is listed in critical condition, according to Mediazone.

The suspect told reporters as he was taken away by police that he had opened fire and carried out the attack “for Russia.”

Hana Levi Julian

London Mayor Sadiq Khan ‘Davens’ While on Whirlwind North America Interfaith Tour

Monday, September 19th, 2016

London’s first Muslim Mayor, Sadiq Khan knows a thing or two about diversity: he dropped in to ‘daven’ (pray, in Yiddish) while he was in town in the Windy City, Chicago over the Sabbath.

Khan has spent the past few days on a whirlwind interfaith tour that started in Montreal and has now led him to New York City, but had him in at least two synagogues over the Sabbath during a very brief visit to the North side of Chicago.

The London mayor attended services with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel at the modern Orthodox Anshe Sholom B’nai Israel synagogue, the Evening Standard reported, and on the same day he also made a brief stop at Temple Sholom, a Reform synagogue. Both are in the same area.

“London is an incredibly diverse and tolerant city,” he said, “but improving social integration is still one of the big challenges we face. That’s why I’m keen to hear from people of many different faiths here in the U.S. to learn from their experiences and to share ideas on how we can bring communities together and strengthen the social fabric that underpins any successful city.

“I want to tell everyone around the world, loud and clear, that London is open to people of all faiths and backgrounds,” he said.

But earlier in the week, he told a group, “We play straight into the hands of those who seek to divide us, of extremists and terrorists around the world, when we imply that it is not possible to hold Western values and to be a Muslim.”

Khan made the comment Thursday while speaking before the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He added that what is needed is to build “bridges, rather than walls,” in what appeared to be a response to the proposal by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump to build a wall at the U.S. border with Mexico.

On Sunday night, Khan tweeted a photo of himself speaking on a panel with New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio at La Guardia Community College, “discussing social integration & how faith communities can help bring people together.”

In addition to an especially warm welcome from the congregation at St. Alban’s Church in Queens on Sunday morning, Khan was given the honor of throwing the first pitch at Sunday’s Mets game. (#LetsGoMets, he tweeted.)

This just proves that the British really envy the American sport of baseball after all: it beats cricket.

This just proves that the British really envy the American sport of baseball after all: it beats cricket.

But not everything was humor and light: Khan was also smart enough to acknowledge the attempted multi-site terror attack that succeeded at least in one location Saturday night, in the city’s Chelsea neighborhood, where 29 people were wounded by shrapnel from a pressure cooker bomb. As a resident of London, the mayor is no stranger to terror: “My thoughts are with all those injured in last night’s explosion in New York and all New Yorkers,” he tweeted. “This is a great city, and a resilient one.”

Hana Levi Julian

Jerusalem Iranian Synagogue Defaced with Crosses

Monday, September 12th, 2016

Jerusalem Police received a report overnight Monday about crosses that were spray painted in black on the front wall and windows of the Koresh synagogue run by Iranian Jews at 34 Yossi Ben Yoezer Street in the Katamon section of Jerusalem. Police investigators and a forensic team arrived at the site.

The synagogue, named Koresh – Mishkan Shalom l’yotzei Iran (Cyrus – abode of peace for Iranian newcomers), is named after the Persian king who allowed Babylonian Jews to return to Israel after the first Exile.

The Iranian Jewish community maintains a close relationship with its brethren in Israel, as part of a tradition that began with the Babylonian exile, when the Jewish community of Iranian started to send a messenger to Israel, to check whether the Jews had started to return to the Land of Israel in order for them to also come back. Israeli Jews of Iranian descent also have a deep connection to Iran, and many continue to use Farsi.

According to a BBC report, Israel Radio broadcasts daily to Iran in Farsi. Twice a week Menashe Amir, a Persian Israeli, hosts a talk show with callers from Iran, the vast majority of whom are Muslim. The show attracts two to six million listeners every day from a country where the Jewish community is estimated at 20,000.

“I would say if 10 people are calling us from Iran, only one is talking about destroying Israel or death to Israel,” Amir told the BBC back in 2007. The Iranian callers aren’t allowed to call Israel directly, and they phone a number in Germany from which they are patched through to the Jerusalem studio.

David Israel

Suspected Car Bomb Outside Marseille Synagogue ‘Had No Detonator’

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

A suspected car bomb was discovered during the Sabbath outside a synagogue in the southern French city of Marseille on Saturday.

Two gas cylinders were found in a car parked outside the Bar Yohaye synagogue in the fourth district, according to numerous posts on social media.

Dozens of worshipers were praying the shacharit morning service when the car was spotted, at approximately 11 am.

Bomb squad sappers were immediately called to the site.

But Bouches-du-Rhône region Police Commissioner Laurent Nuñez told media no trigger mechanism was found, and the car was not stolen.

French police have been on high alert since an ISIS-inspired attempt a week ago, however, to blow up the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Authorities said seven gas canisters were found inside an abandoned Peugeot vehicle with no license plate outside the Paris cathedral. Forensics experts tracked down suspects via DNA found at the site.

Three women have since been arrested in connection with the attempted terror attack a week ago in Paris.

Hana Levi Julian

The Ancient Susiya Synagogue

Sunday, August 21st, 2016

The Israel Museum has reconstructed part of the inside of the ancient Susiya (Susya) synagogue. You can see what a magnificent building it must have been.

The excavated Jewish synagogue in Susiya dates from the 4th to the 7th century CE and was in continuous use until the 9th century CE.

(The Israel Museum) The magnificent synagogue of Susiya in the southern Hebron hills stood for hundreds of years and underwent many renovations. Its bema (podium) was built next to the long northern wall, which featured three arched niches. The central one likely held the Torah Ark, and the two others each held a menorah. The bema’s carved and incised motifs included menorahs, animals, and plants. Numerous donor inscriptions on the walls and floor attest to the community’s active participation in the building’s construction.

Susiya Synagogue in the Israel Museum 2

The Susiya Synagogue in situ:

1024px-SusyaSynogogueInterior Source: Yaacov / Wikipedia

Susiya Synagogue Explanation

Photo of the Day

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/the-ancient-susiya-synagogue/2016/08/21/

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