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Parshas Shemini


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXIV No. 14                                                     5773
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
April 5 2013 – 25 Nissan 5773
7:05 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 8:13 p.m. NYC E.D.T
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 8:37 p.m. NYC E.D.T
Weekly Reading: Shemini
Weekly Haftara: Vayosef od David (2 Samuel 6:1 – 7:17)
Daf Yomi: Eruvin 28
Mishna Yomit: Bava Metzia  3:1-2
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim  218:3-5
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Shekalim chap 4 – Hilchos Kiddush ha’Chodesh 2
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:24 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 6:32 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:45 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:25 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Pirkei Avos: Chapt. 1
Sefiras HaOmer: 10

 

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim, we bless the new moon, and due to Sefira we say Av Ha’rachamim, however at Mincha we do not say Tzidkos’cha. Rosh Chodesh Iyar is 2 days, Wednesday and Thursday.

The molad is Wednesday evening, 5 minutes and 15 chalakim (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) past 7:00 p.m. (in Jerusalem).

      Rosh Chodesh Iyar: Tuesday evening at Maariv we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo (at Maariv only) one does not repeat (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, which explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night). Following the Shemoneh Esreh,  Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Kaddish Yasom.

Wednesday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh, half Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Baal Keria recites half- Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Aron, Ashrei, U’va Letziyyon – we delete La’menatze’ach – the chazzan recites half- Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

Musaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by Reader’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half Hallel, and before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, which we also add to Birkas Hamazon as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Wednesday evening: second day Rosh Chodesh, Maariv we add ya’aleh ve’yavo in Shemoneh Esreh.

Thursdayday morning: Shacharis and Mincha same as yesterday.Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (we usually wait until Motza’ei Shabbos).

                                The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

 

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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