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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Cabernet Sauvignon’

Top Ten Wines For The New Year

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

   Rosh Hashanah is all about new beginnings and self-improvement and kosher wineries all over the world are making a commitment to producing great wines at affordable prices. Here are 10 suggestions for a fresh start on kosher wines.

 

   Baron Herzog Zinfandel, which has wonderful aromas of blackberry and raspberries balanced with vanilla and spice, has just been issued the seal of the Lodi Rules Certified Green Sustainability Program. The Lodi Rules program uses Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a long-term solution for both the environment and economy. IPM reduces the amount of harmful pesticides introduced into the grapes as well as the environment. When you enjoy the delicious Baron Herzog Zinfandel, you know you are doing the right thing for the environment and for yourself.

 

   For the first time in almost 10 years, the Herzog family presents the Late Harvest Riesling in a 375ML size. The Riesling has intense, late harvest aromas of dried apricot, pineapple and baked apple, a rich and luscious full mouth feel and sweet forward impression with a very well balanced finish. The flavor of apricot and honey will linger for a long time.

 

   Pinot Noir is a very elegant wine varietal. While usually dismissed as too soft or light for a red, the complexity of aromas on the palate of Pinot Noir more than makes up for it. The Herzog Reserve Pinot Noir is an exquisite wine, with silky texture and fine-tuned layers of cherry, raspberry, anise and spice flavors.

 

   The year 2006 in California was an excellent harvest for red wine varietals from the Herzog Winery. One of the best examples is the Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, which recently was given a phenomenal rating of 92 points by a well-respected wine publication. The Herzog Reserve Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is a full-bodied wine exhibiting berry, cherry and licorice aromas and flavors of mocha and vanilla. This wine is the perfect example of affordable luxury.

 

   Sparkling wines are superb for toasts and celebrations. Rosh Hashanah is the start of a new year and the Elvi Brut Cava Sparkling Wine is an ideal fit. Cava is a Sparkling Wine made in the French champagne method and, similarly to champagne, can only be called Cava if grown in the specific regions in Spain for cava. The Elvi Adar Brut is bubbly, and dry, with notes of flowers, citrus and strawberries.

 

   Finding fun, fresh and enjoyable wines that are capable of being paired with food or enjoyed on their own is an arduous task. The Red, Pink, and White by W Wines have just made that task a lot easier. The Red has flavors of grenadine and fresh berries followed by a crisp finish. The White is lively with aromas of grapefruit, elegant floral notes and white peach flavors on the palate. The Pink is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel and Muscat Canelli. It’s aromatic and refreshing, with hints of wild strawberry and cherry, and a soft, well-balanced finish. The W Wines are also affordable as they are all under $10 so even the most budget conscience consumer will be satisfied.

 

   New Zealand wines other than Sauvignon Blanc are now moving into the spotlight as top tier high quality wines. Goose Bay Chardonnay is a rich, big wine with tropical fruit flavors of citrus and pineapple as well as green apples, fine oak and a touch of vanilla. Chardonnays are great for Rosh Hashanah because one of the flavor traits for chardonnay is apple.

 

   The next few wines highlight some of the hot, up and coming new wineries in Israel from the Judean Hills Region. The Judean Hills Region is well known as a winemaking region going as far back to when the Roman Legions supplied their soldier’s rations with wine from the Judean Hills.

 

   The Shiloh winery, founded in Shiloh in the Shomron Region in Israel, has just the right wine for the New Year. The Secret Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon’s grapes are harvested from a simple vineyard nestled on a small slope in the Judean Hills. The Cabernet grapes are then crushed and barreled for 14 months in new French oak barrels after which most are bottled for the regular Cabernet Sauvignon. The best barrels are selected to be aged an additional two months before bottling and named the Secret Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. The Secret Reserve has notes of rich cassis, toasted oak and spice, with a long concentrated finish.

 

   The Tzuba Estate Winery is located in an area historically recognized as a major wine-producing region since biblical times. The local topography of the Tzuba hillside vineyard has an altitude of 700 meters and a climate that provides ideal conditions for staff to cultivate the vineyards and produce a variety of prize-winning boutique wines. The inaugural 2005 Tzuba Metsuda wine is a blend of 75% Merlot and 25% Cabernet Sauvignon. The wine was aged in French oak barrels for 24 months, and is medium dark in color and full-bodied. It has a complex aroma of spices, mineral soil, licorice, tobacco leaves and coffee beans. This velvety, harmonious, quality wine has abundant tastes of red ripe fruits, chocolate and roasted oak, with a long finish.

 

   For the tenth wine it’s appropriate the winery’s name is Psagot, which in Hebrew means apex. Psagot wineries flagship wine, Edom, meaning red in Hebrew, is a blend of 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 25% Merlot. The Edom has rich spicy vanilla notes with berries, black currants and oriental spice flavors.

 

 

   Shlomo S. Blashka is wine communications director for Royal Wine Corp.

Shavuot/Spring Wines

Monday, May 25th, 2009

   The weather is getting warmer, the days are getting longer – spring is in the air and Shavuot is almost here! The warm weather and dairy Shavuot meals provide the perfect excuse to pop the corks on the newest vintage of white and ros? wines.

 

   Aside from some oak-aged white wines, most white and ros? wines should be consumed young, while they are fresh and crisp. Which means that when selecting a white or ros? this Shavuot, try to buy wine from a recent vintage (such as 2007). Also remember to serve these wines chilled, but not too cold – this can mask some of their aromas. Try removing them from the fridge about 10 minutes prior to drinking.

 

   With its refreshing citrus flavors and lip smacking acidity, Sauvignon Blanc is the perfect pairing for a festive, dairy meal. And some of the best examples of Sauvignon Blanc are coming out of New Zealand, where the Goose Bay winery is producing terrific wines. The 2007 Goose Bay Sauvignon Blanc has a bright acidity that is sure to make your mouth water. Tart berry and green grass aromas, together with the aforementioned acidity make this versatile food wine an ideal pairing for a salad, sushi or spicy Asian cuisine.

 

   Chardonnay has for years been the go-to white wine for many people. But like Merlot, whose mass produced and dull (but easily palatable) California style ultimately led to a Merlot backlash, oaky Chardonnay is losing its fanfare. This highly aromatic grape is too often being aged in new oak barrels and undergoing a secondary fermentation process (known as malolactic fermentation) that leads to a wine whose fruity aromas become masked by aromas of toast (from the barrels) and butter (from the secondary fermentation). Recognizing this trend, we are seeing wineries producing Chardonnays that are made in a lighter style that allows the grape’s fruity characteristics to shine through.

 

   The 2007 Efrat “Israeli” Chardonnay does have a hint of oak, but not from barrels. Rather, this stainless steel made wine is aged together in the tanks with oak staves. These staves impart a pleasant hint of spice while allowing the tropical and stone fruit aromas and flavors to shine through. This wine would complete a light lunch of lemon sole and olive couscous.

 

   Though light, crisp and refreshing works best in warmer weather, a white wine with more body (think heavy cream vs. skim milk) pairs favorably with Shavuot classics such as creamy pastas, blintzes or quiche. Viognier is an up and coming white varietal that is often aged in oak and generally made from very ripe grapes – something intentionally done to enable the wines to showcase their pretty floral and tropical aromas.

 

   The 2007 Dalton “Wild Yeast Fermentation” Viognier is an elegant and natural wine (fermented without the addition of foreign yeast strains) with sweet floral aromas and rich creamy flavors. White flowers and hints of honeydew make this wine a terrific pairing for sweet potato souffl?, fettuccini alfredo or parmesan crusted flounder.

 

   Another great (and more colorful) option for warm weather drinking is ros?. While red wines get their color from extended contact with the grape skins, ros? gets its color from minimal contact with the skins. Many ros? wines are actually made from familiar red varietals such as Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese and even Cabernet Sauvignon.

 

   From Israel, the Binyamina winery makes a ros? under its Yogev label. A blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel, this reddish-pink wine has tart berry aromas and is a nice option on a warm summer day. Though not traditional Shavuot fare, this wine makes me crave a summer BBQ and a juicy burger with all the fixings.

 

   Another ros?, this one made in France, is the 2007 Rothschild Ros? de Clarke. This pinkish-orange tinged wine has fresh strawberry aromas and elegant mineral and fruit flavors. A pleasant and long finish makes this lovely ros? a worthy companion for those special salmon or tuna steaks.

 

   Wine compliments food and completes a meal. Save the grape juice for the kids and indulge in a refreshing glass of wine this yom tov. But remember that whether white, ros? or a robust red, the most important factor when choosing a wine is finding one that you enjoy.

 

   Gary Landsman, a.k.a. the “Wine Tasting Guy,” makes, sells, writes about and of course tastes wine. You can read more of his writings at www.winetastingguy.com or contact him with any wine related questions at gary@winetastingguy.com.

Shavuot/Spring Wines

Monday, May 25th, 2009

   The weather is getting warmer, the days are getting longer – spring is in the air and Shavuot is almost here! The warm weather and dairy Shavuot meals provide the perfect excuse to pop the corks on the newest vintage of white and rosé wines.

 

   Aside from some oak-aged white wines, most white and rosé wines should be consumed young, while they are fresh and crisp. Which means that when selecting a white or rosé this Shavuot, try to buy wine from a recent vintage (such as 2007). Also remember to serve these wines chilled, but not too cold – this can mask some of their aromas. Try removing them from the fridge about 10 minutes prior to drinking.

 

   With its refreshing citrus flavors and lip smacking acidity, Sauvignon Blanc is the perfect pairing for a festive, dairy meal. And some of the best examples of Sauvignon Blanc are coming out of New Zealand, where the Goose Bay winery is producing terrific wines. The 2007 Goose Bay Sauvignon Blanc has a bright acidity that is sure to make your mouth water. Tart berry and green grass aromas, together with the aforementioned acidity make this versatile food wine an ideal pairing for a salad, sushi or spicy Asian cuisine.

 

   Chardonnay has for years been the go-to white wine for many people. But like Merlot, whose mass produced and dull (but easily palatable) California style ultimately led to a Merlot backlash, oaky Chardonnay is losing its fanfare. This highly aromatic grape is too often being aged in new oak barrels and undergoing a secondary fermentation process (known as malolactic fermentation) that leads to a wine whose fruity aromas become masked by aromas of toast (from the barrels) and butter (from the secondary fermentation). Recognizing this trend, we are seeing wineries producing Chardonnays that are made in a lighter style that allows the grape’s fruity characteristics to shine through.

 

   The 2007 Efrat “IsraeliChardonnay does have a hint of oak, but not from barrels. Rather, this stainless steel made wine is aged together in the tanks with oak staves. These staves impart a pleasant hint of spice while allowing the tropical and stone fruit aromas and flavors to shine through. This wine would complete a light lunch of lemon sole and olive couscous.

 

   Though light, crisp and refreshing works best in warmer weather, a white wine with more body (think heavy cream vs. skim milk) pairs favorably with Shavuot classics such as creamy pastas, blintzes or quiche. Viognier is an up and coming white varietal that is often aged in oak and generally made from very ripe grapes – something intentionally done to enable the wines to showcase their pretty floral and tropical aromas.

 

   The 2007 Dalton “Wild Yeast Fermentation” Viognier is an elegant and natural wine (fermented without the addition of foreign yeast strains) with sweet floral aromas and rich creamy flavors. White flowers and hints of honeydew make this wine a terrific pairing for sweet potato soufflé, fettuccini alfredo or parmesan crusted flounder.

 

   Another great (and more colorful) option for warm weather drinking is rosé. While red wines get their color from extended contact with the grape skins, rosé gets its color from minimal contact with the skins. Many rosé wines are actually made from familiar red varietals such as Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese and even Cabernet Sauvignon.

 

   From Israel, the Binyamina winery makes a rosé under its Yogev label. A blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel, this reddish-pink wine has tart berry aromas and is a nice option on a warm summer day. Though not traditional Shavuot fare, this wine makes me crave a summer BBQ and a juicy burger with all the fixings.

 

   Another rosé, this one made in France, is the 2007 Rothschild Rosé de Clarke. This pinkish-orange tinged wine has fresh strawberry aromas and elegant mineral and fruit flavors. A pleasant and long finish makes this lovely rosé a worthy companion for those special salmon or tuna steaks.

 

   Wine compliments food and completes a meal. Save the grape juice for the kids and indulge in a refreshing glass of wine this yom tov. But remember that whether white, rosé or a robust red, the most important factor when choosing a wine is finding one that you enjoy.


 


   Gary Landsman, a.k.a. the “Wine Tasting Guy,” makes, sells, writes about and of course tastes wine. You can read more of his writings at www.winetastingguy.com or contact him with any wine related questions at gary@winetastingguy.com.

New Kosher Wines For Passover

Wednesday, April 9th, 2008

         Passover is to the kosher food market what Christmas is to the rest of retail – it’s make-or-break time, and the season to roll out new and exciting products. The kosher wine trade is no exception, and this year there are plenty of new and interesting kosher wines to enjoy at your Seder.

 

         Passover is a special and holy time. It is the Jewish festival commemorating the exodus from Egypt and the liberation of the Israelites from slavery, and is probably the best known Jewish holiday. It is the ultimate excuse for Jews to gather and eat and schmooze and contemplate the divine, as well as divine food, such as brisket, tzimmes, matzah balls, and kosher wine.

 

         Just in case there are any doubts, there are some truly excellent kosher wines in the market today. We have all read the usual tiresome obligatory introductory shtick by wine writers the world over: “It’s not your grandfather’s kosher wine anymore!” Part historical stigma and part cultural apologia, kosher wine as a category still suffers an image problem.

 

         True enough, kosher wine in the United States has most often been associated with sweet and heavy Concord grape wines made by companies such as Schapiro’s, Manischewitz, and Mogen David. Nostalgia helps keep these labels alive among Jews, but the kosher consumer market has drastically shifted up the quality scale. Since kosher is a dietary code rather than a taste profile, there is nothing about kosher wine that requires it to be qualitatively any different from non-kosher wine, much less sweet and syrupy or disappointingly undrinkable.

 

         Here, then, are 10 kosher wines that are well worth seeking out for your Passover festivities this year.

 

         Goose Bay, Chardonnay, Marlborough, New Zealand, 2006 ($26): The latest from this New Zealand label – produced by the Spencer Hill Estate winery under contract for kosher wine importer Royal Wine Corp – is a very appealing lemon-to-chartreuse colored, mouth-watering, dry, crisp, textured and fruity chardonnay exhibiting aromas and flavors of apples, tropical fruits, something faintly herbal, and with pleasantly light oak and vanilla undertones. This should prove to be both a crowd pleaser and an appetite enhancer. Score: 4/5.

 

         Psagot, Merlot, Judean Hills, Israel, 2004 ($25): This dark, deep medium bodied, fairly oaky, garnet colored merlot offers aromas and bright flavors of plums, black cherries, and something a tad bell-pepper-like, but with some enjoyable whispers of clove and green peppercorn-like spices; the tannins are a bit too soft, so drink it in the next year or so, rather than further down the road. Score: 4/5. Note: Psagot, which means “summit” or “the peak” in Hebrew, is a settlement situated northeast of Jerusalem on top of a hill overlooking the al-Bireh village of Ramallah, as well as the Wadi Kelt basin, the Jericho Valley, the Dead Sea, and the Edomite Mountains.

 

         Barkan, Reserve, Shiraz, Israel, 2005 ($20): Made of 93% Shiraz, 5% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 2% Petit Verdot grapes from Barkan’s vineyards in Kiriat-Anavim (in the Jerusalem Hills) and Eliad (in the Golan Heights), this dark violet to purple colored wine is firm, intense and rich with aromas and flavors of oak, black currants, blackberries, cherries, licorice, clove, thyme, and cedar wood, and with traces of spearmint, vanilla and perhaps a tinge of musk. The wine needs some time to open, so swirl it around vigorously before your first sip. Score: 4/5.

 

         Herzog, Syrah, Special Reserve, Edna Valley, California, 2004 ($34): This medium to full bodied nearly opaque garnet to black colored California Syrah combines elegance and brawn. This almost creamy yet still assertively tannic wine presents nicely layered aromas and flavors of black currants, raspberries, ripe plums, black pepper, cloves, something very much like tobacco (but in a good way), and even some chocolate. Not one to cellar for the long haul, enjoy it now and over the next couple of years. Score: 4/5.

 

        Binyamina, Yogev, Cabernet-Merlot, Israel, 2005 ($14): The word “yogev” in Hebrew means “farmer” or “man of the soil” and is in recognition of the esteem and appreciation the winery has for the toil and dedication of their viticulturalists and farmers (named on the back of the label). This simple but appealing medium-bodied blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon and 50% Merlot is a case in point, offering pleasing aromas and tasty flavors of blackberries, currants, plums, cassis and some subtle herbal and cedar wood notes; nothing fancy here, but honest, clean and quaffable. Drink now. Score: 4/5.

 

         Carmel, Gewürztraminer, Late Harvest, Single Vineyard, Kerem Sha’al, Upper Galilee, Israel, 2005 ($19): This sweet, elegant dessert wine has some lovely depth, with pronounced aromas and flavors of apricots, peaches, nectarines, litchis, cinnamon, honey, pineapple and rose petals all set against nicely balancing acidity, preventing the whole from seeming too sweet or sticky. Brilliant now, it should keep and mature if properly cellared through 2012. Score: 5/5.

 

        Capcanes, Flor de Primavera/Peraj Ha’Abib, Montsant, Spain, 2003 ($45): A stunning wine! This delicious oak-aged, deep, dark ruby-colored blend of 40% Grenache, 35% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Carignan and 5% Tempranillo grapes is wonderfully balanced between tannins, acidity, wood and fruit, with almost tangible aromas and elegant yet robust flavors of black currants, plums, sweet blackberries, raspberries, cherries and mocha, with intriguing overlays of cedar wood, coffee, white pepper, licorice and minerals, and with something very much like mint emerging on the lengthy finish. Outstanding now, this will continue to develop and drink well through 2013, if cellared properly. Score: 5/5.

 

         Hagafen, Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, 2003 ($40): Another stunning wine. Like virtually everything from this Napa winery, their latest Cab (technically a blend of 89% Cabernet Sauvignon and 11% Cab Franc grapes) is simply gorgeous. This opaque inky colored wine is sumptuous and supple, perfectly balanced between fruit, acidity and tannins, and deliciously complex, offering layers of aromas and flavors that include currants, black cherries, cedar wood, black licorice, black pepper, dark chocolate, eucalyptus, cassis, blueberries and mint, with a marvelous earthy finish with spice, berries and something slightly menthol in the long, rewarding finish. Drinking brilliantly now, if properly cellared, this will age gracefully over the next decade – presuming you have that sort of patience and self-control. Score: 5/5.

 

        Recanati, Special Reserve, Israel, 2003 ($30): Give this one time to breath, and it will command your respect. This deep, full bodied, brilliantly balanced blend of 72% Cabernet Sauvignon and 28% Merlot grapes offer luxurious aromas and flavors of currants, cassis, black cherry, plums, vanilla, with subtle but conspicuous layers of mint, black pepper, café mocha, and with that distinctive and intriguing Recanati stamp of bell peppers, olives and Mediterranean herbs. Delicious now, but will reward proper cellaring through 2015. Score: 5/5.

 

         Barons Edmond et Benjamin de Rothschild, Haut Medoc, Bordeaux, France, 2003 ($30): Made at the Rothschild’s famed Chateau Clarke, this medium bodied, oak aged blend of 40% Merlot and 60% Cabernet Sauvignon grapes is well crafted with a nicely balanced if somewhat mild structure of tannins and acidity, showcasing aromas and flavors of red currants, black cherries, and blackberries, with appealing notes of black pepper and chocolate. Drink now. Score: 4/5.

 

Rating system


5/5 = Excellent


4/5 = Very good indeed


3/5 = Good


2/5 = Kind of drinkable


1/5 = Best reserved for hand-to-hand combat

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/new-kosher-wines-for-passover/2008/04/09/

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