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May 29, 2016 / 21 Iyar, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Chabad Lubavitch’

Official New Kosher Tartan Created by Scottish-born Chabad Rabbi

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

The only Scottish-born rabbi north of the border, a Chabad emissary, has created an official kosher tartan after 300 years of Jewish history in the country.

Rabbi Mendel Jacobs, who ministers to an independent Orthodox congregation in Glasgow, said he worked together with Mike Wilson, a registry official, to design the new tartan. It is officially registered with the Scottish National Register of Tartan in the name of the Jewish Community of Scotland.

Better, it’s already available in a variety of prayer shawls, kipas and other items. An invitation has been extended to the Israeli Ambassador to the UK for a fitting with a kilt in the new kosher tartan.

Official kosher Jewish tartan registered to the Scottish National Register of Tartan in the name of the Jewish Community of Scotland.

Official kosher Jewish tartan registered to the Scottish National Register of Tartan in the name of the Jewish Community of Scotland.

The new tartan is a kosher non-wool/linen mix that meets the requirements of shatnez: the Torah law that prohibits Jews from wearing any mixture of wool and linen in garments.

“Jews have always had a positive relationship with Scotland,” Jacobs said. “Scotland is one of the few countries where there is no history of persecutions. There are also a lot of Jewish ex-pats around the world with links to Scotland.”

The design incorporates blue and white, the colors of both the Israeli and the Scottish flags. The central gold line represents the gold from the Ark in the Biblical Tabernacle and the ceremonial vessels. “The silver is to represent the silver that adorns the Scroll of the Law and the color red is for the traditional Kiddush wine.” There are seven lines in the central motif and three in the flag representations – both numbers of great significance in Judaism.

International attention has been drawn to the new tartan, Jacobs said, and to the design which has managed to weave together both Jewish and Scottish culture.

The idea for creating an official Jewish tartan dated back to 2008 with a Glaswegian dentist, Dr. Clive Schmulian, who discussed the possibility with Jewish Telegraph editor Paul Harris at a charity dinner in Glasgow. Schmulian was wearing a Flower of Scotland tartan kilt at the time, and was asked if there had ever been a Jewish kilt or tartan. Eventually one was produced but is no longer made.

The Jewish presence in Scotland dates back to the late 17th century, although the current population is comprised mostly of descendants of immigrants who arrived in the 1800s. Most Jews live in Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Hana Levi Julian

NYPD Evacuates 770 After 911 Gets Bomb Threat

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

A bomb threat called in Tuesday night to New York’s 911 emergency switchboard forced a complete evacuation of “770” — the World Headquarters of Chabad-Lubavitch, based in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights neighborhood.

The call was allegedly traced back to a “psych ward,” according to a police source quoted by COLLive.com, but “we’re still taking all precautions,” NYPD reportedly said.

Just a few hours earlier, police and counterterrorism experts had met with the heads of Jewish schools and organizations in the neighborhood for precisely this reason: to talk about potential terrorist scenarios and the measures that were in place to prevent and deal with them.

Around the same time, “770” had been filled with senior citizens for a “Chanukah Hakhel” program to celebrate the holiday. (This year Chanukah falls on the year of Hakhel, when Jews of old were commanded to gather together for a special reading of the Torah by the king of Israel himself.)

The local Crown Heights civil Shomrim security patrol assisted with the evacuation, working together as translators in some cases with members of the NYPD Emergency Services Unit.

The officers were needed to explain the urgency of the situation to non-English speakers in various languages: what needed to be done, and why, as quickly as possible. “Everyone cooperated and the building was successfully evacuated in quick and orderly fashion,” according to CrownHeights.info.

People were allowed to re-enter the building after police completed a walk-through and inspection.

Hana Levi Julian

Chassidic New Year’s Celebrations Cheer Up Israel, Cities Around the World

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

In hundreds of towns and cities throughout Israel Monday night, Chabad communities gathered to celebrate the Yud-Tes Kislev, the 19th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev.

It’s known as the Chassidic New Year, and is celebrated with great joy among Chabad-Lubavitch Chassidim and many others as well.

The date marks the day in 1798 that a Czarist commission acquitted and freed from imprisonment the first Chabad Rebbe – Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, known as the “Alter Rebbe” – on charges of subverting the government and aiding the Ottoman Empire. The date also marks the anniversary of the passing of the Alter Rebbe’s mentor, Rabbi Dov Ber of Mezerich, in 1772.

This year is also the Hakhel year, when in ancient times, Jewish men, women and children would gather in the Temple in Jerusalem to hear the reading of the Torah by the king of Israel once every seven years, following the year of Shemittah, the sabbatical year.

Israeli Jews gathered to sing, dance, join in a festive meal, speak words of Torah and Chassidic learning; “farbreng” – a Yiddish word meaning to gather and celebrate – in every community where Chabad exists.

In the northern Negev city of Arad, Mayor Nissan Ben Hamo was the honored guest at that community’s Yud Tes Kislev farbrengen, where Jews from every walk of life were seen. The mayor took the opportunity to add in his remarks a reminder to participants to attend the next day’s rally against the government plan to locate a phosphate mine near Arad, which the city’s residents vehemently oppose. Celebrants applauded the mayor’s passion for helping his city, and his clear appreciation for their heritage.

In Jerusalem, Yud Tes Kislev has become a three-day affair at the International Convention Center with a giant Chassidic book fair, farbrengens, classes and other activities. The main event will feature an address by Rabbi Yoel Kahn, revered expositor of many of the Torah teachings of the late Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, of righteous memory. There will also be a special session with Hebron-based Chassidic artist Baruch Nachson, whose renowned paintings are seen in collections and galleries worldwide.

Thousands of yeshiva students gathered Monday night to “farbreng” at the Center, where Chassidic vocalist Avraham Fried led the crowd in singing traditional “nigunim,” Chassidic melodies dating back decades and centuries. Another farbrengen with Fried, likely to be even larger, is scheduled for Tuesday night as the celebration continue. Tickets were sold out long ago and even scalpers do not exist for this one.

The Jews of Kharkov, Ukraine have the custom to travel to Haditch, the grave site of the Alter Rebbe, every year on this day. The group this year is being led by Rabbi Levi Raices, head of the city’s yeshiva high school, which makes the trip along with the wider community.

In Brooklyn, NY celebrations are being held in numerous neighborhoods, including one in the central Chabad neighborhood of Crown Heights, exclusively for women. At Yeshiva University in Manhattan, students are selling Chassidic books in advance of a farbrengen to be led by YU mentor Rabbi Moshe Weinberger and Chabad scholar and teacher Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe.

Hana Levi Julian

Thousands of Chabad-Lubavitch Rabbis Gather at NYC’s Largest Banquet

Sunday, November 8th, 2015
More than 5,200 rabbis and communal leaders from 86 countries are sitting down to schmooze over dinner at the Big Apple’s biggest banquet as the International Conference of Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries gets underway Sunday evening.
Not only is the event New York City’s largest sit-down dinner, it is also North America’s largest Jewish event. It is also one of the only opportunities during the year that one can grasp the magnitude of the global phenomenon of today’s Chabad  movement, and experience some of the spirit that is driving it.
 
As a courtesy to our readers, JewishPress.com is broadcasting the event live:
 
<script language=”javascript” type=”text/javascript” src=”http://embed.chabad.org/multimedia/mediaplayer/embedded/embed.js.asp?aid=221818&width=auto&height=auto></script><span style=”clear:both;” class=”lb” id=”lbdiv”>Visit <a href=”http://www.chabad.org/multimedia/default_cdo/aid/591213/jewish/Video.htm“>Jewish.TV</a> for more <a href=”http://www.chabad.org/multimedia/default_cdo/aid/591213/jewish/Video.htm“>Jewish videos</a>.</span>
The hearing-impaired and deaf Jewish community is participating in the International Conference of Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries this year via simultaneous translation of the evening’s speeches in American Sign Language., organizers told JewishPress.com.
Translations for the hearing-impaired are also being projected in the banquet hall at the converted South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, and on the Chabad.org webcast.
 
The annual group photo of every Chabad emissary from around the world has become a mainstay of the four-day-long conference that culminates in the long-awaited banquet. The tradition began with a few dozen rabbis in the early 1980s, but it has long since grown to become a logistical feat with not a few acrobatics involved. The photo eventually makes its way around the world to places that many readers may not even have heard of — and some of the new emissaries may not even have known existed, until they were assigned to their posts!
 
Another strong mainstay of the annual gathering is the traditional pilgrimage to the final resting place in Queens, New York, of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson zt’l and that of the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe,Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneerson zt’l.
Visitors waited for hours in line, praying as they prepared to deliver their handwritten requests for blessings for themselves and their communities, beginning with their arrival last week.
At the banquet, Mumbai terror attack survivor Moshe Holtzberg, now age 9, was set to lead the crowd of thousands in the recitation of psalms.The world came to know little Moshe through grainy footage of his Indian nanny rushing him to safety during the terrorist attack that took his parent’s lives, and his cries for his mother during a memorial event held days later that pierced hearts everywhere.
Seven years later, Moshe now lives with his grandparents in Israel, and he has participated in events such as the international conference with confidence and aplomb, born to the environment and raised by Chabad emissaries, as were his parents before him.
Hana Levi Julian

Terror Attack Foiled in Kfar Chabad, Guards Advised in Construction Sites

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

A terror attack was foiled in Kfar Chabad on Thursday when a man was caught carrying weapons into the Chassidic community.

When the man was searched, he was found to be carrying an axe, a knife and a club, in addition to the flag of the Hamas terrorist organization, Ynet reported.

The would-be terrorist was arrested and transferred to security personnel for questioning.

The Chief Rabbi of Kfar Chabad, Rabbi Meir Ashkenazi released a public letter addressing the security crisis, calling on residents to recite psalms chapters 20, 22, 69, and 130 after the morning service and to carry out other activities in the schools.

Rabbi Ashkenazi also called on residents to stop employing Arab construction workers during the current wave of terror. He urged Kfar Chabad residents to suspend working with Arab construction workers during the crisis, or “at least provide an armed security guard to oversee the construction workers,” according to a report by CrownHeights.info.

The rabbi also asked residents to join the community’s security patrol, for those capable of doing so, and emphasized, “One who cannot suspend working with Arabs in the coming days must place an armed guard in the area.”

Hana Levi Julian

Chabad-Lubavitch Vows ‘Vibrant Jewish Life’ to Continue in Paris

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Chabad-Lubavitch Chairman of Educational and Social Services Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky said Sunday that it is with “profound outrage that we mourn all those murdered last week at the hands of terrorists in Paris last week, including four Jews at a kosher supermarket. Seized Friday afternoon as shoppers were preparing for Shabbat, the terror at the store leaves a Jewish community feeling vulnerable.

“With the largest Jewish population in the European Union, the safety of France’s Jews is of deep concern to us,” Krinsky continued. “Chabad-Lubavitch represents hundreds of thousands of Jews in France. In Paris alone, with some 35 Chabad centers, including schools, shuls, and yeshivas, our representatives serve Jews in every district of the city. Indeed, two of the murdered, Yoav Hattab and Phillipe Braham, had close affiliations with our institutions.”

Last Friday for the first time ever, following the attack on the Hyper Cacher kosher grocery in Paris, Jews in the city’s La Marais neighborhood were advised by the rabbinical council to stay home from synagogue and remain safe, noting the city was “still on edge.”  Likewise, stores were shut down in the neighborhood to further discourage people from stepping out into the danger zone.

Krinsky maintained one should not have to sacrifice security for Jewish quality of life in France.

“Chabad representatives have, and will continue to further enhance security measures to protect the men, women and children who come to study, to pray, and to socialize at the city’s Chabad Houses. But they will not shut down the vibrant Jewish life that they have nurtured in Paris, and that its Jews have now enjoyed for many decades.

“Prime Minister Valls was right in acknowledging that France will be judged a failure if its Jews are forced to flee. We urge Paris’s city authorities and the French government to take decisive steps to ensure the safety and security of France’s Jews and of all its citizens.

“On behalf of Chabad-Lubavitch worldwide, our condolences to all the survivors and families of the victims,” Krinsky added. “May G-d comfort them among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.”

Hana Levi Julian

Giant Chabad Menorah Lit Without Ceremony in Martin Place, Sydney

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

In Sydney, Australia, a public Hanukkah menorah still stands tall in the very same place it has stood in Martin Place for the last 30 years.

The 10 meter high menorah was not the center of festivities this year, however: instead, a message was prominently displayed for the public to read.

“The Jewish community of Australia expresses our deepest sympathy for the families of the Martin Place tragedy. May the Lights of the Festival of Chanukah bring comfort and warmth to our nation.”

The decision to cancel the annual Lighting Ceremony of the Hanukkah Menorah in Martin Place, scheduled for Thursday Dec. 18, the third night of the holiday, was made “after lengthy discussions and consultation with the authorities and communal leaders,” explained Chabad-Lubavitch emissary Rabbi Elimelech Levy, Director of Chabad NSW and coordinator of the annual “Chanukah in the City” celebration.

“While the event was canceled, the presence of the Giant Menorah sends a powerful message that light will always overcome darkness,” Levy said.

“As we mourn the loss of life and the atrocity that has taken place, people of goodwill will continue to shine the light of freedom and communal harmony, which is what the Chanukah Menorah is all about,” he added.

According to Chabad officials at the movement’s World Lubavitch Headquarters at “770” Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn, NY, the Martin Place Giant Menorah was indeed lit and cast its Light upon the area as it does each year. However, in deference to the memory of the victims, no public ceremony was held to mark the occasion.

The manager of the Lindt cafe and a local barrister were killed last Tuesday after being held hostage together with at least 15 others by a lone gunman, Man Haron Monis. The victims were shot as special agents stormed the cafe in an attempt to free the hostages. The self-styled Iranian cleric had forced his captives to hold up a flag bearing the Shahada — the Islamic creed, written in Arabic — in the window, for hours.

An earlier article about the Menorah contained an error about the lighting ceremony due to a misunderstanding which has since been clarified.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/giant-chabad-menorah-lit-without-ceremony-in-martin-place-sydney/2014/12/22/

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