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November 26, 2015 / 14 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Hadassah Hospital’

Arab Rock-Throwers Injure Baby

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Palestinian Authority rock-throwing terrorists wounded a baby near the community of Maaleh Levunah in Samaria Tuesday might. Her father, who was behind the wheel, continued driving, and the baby was treated at Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus for light injuries.

Another motorist was pelted with rocks near Tekoa, in eastern Gush Etzion, after he stopped his car because of an accident.

Near Tekoa, a soldier was treated on the spot for light inquires after being by hit rocks.

A soldier was treated at Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital afar suffering light injuries from rock-throwing at Kalandia, near Ramallah.

Terrorists attacked a vehicle with a firebomb near Neguhot, south of Hebron, but no injuries or damage was reported. Further south, several vehicles sustained damage from rocks at the Zif junction, near the city of Yatta, on Highway 60 between Kiryat Arba-Hebron and Arad. The area has been relatively quiet for months until the latest escalation of violence.

Near the Tapuach Junction in Samaria, Border Police foiled a stabbing attack. They grabbed a terrorist when he refused to obey orders to stop for inspection. He dropped a knife, and officers found a second knife in his possession.

At Har Adar, near the security fence, Border Police shot and wounded an Arab in the leg during a riot near the rear entrance to the community.

Palestinian Authority media reported that 129 Arabs were injured in clashes on Tuesday, but the numbers usually are exaggerated and often include people who were hurt in home and work accidents. A spokesman for the Red Crescent told the Ma’an News Agency that soldiers wounded eight rioters with live fire and 23 others with rubber bullets,

It added that the Palestinian Authority “has warned that “attacks by Israeli soldiers and settlers indicate the Israeli government is deliberately creating a situation of violence and instability that threatens to spiral out of control.”

Shira Klein Regains Consiousness

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

Shira Klein, the young woman who was seriously injured in the April 15th Jerusalem terror attack that killed Shalom Yochai Sherki has woken up.

Doctors at Hadassah hospital report that Klein has regained consciousness, is breathing on her own and is talking to her family.

The terror attack happened at French Hill, when an Arab drive drove his car into the tow as they waited at a bus stop.

Victim Dies in Suspected Jerusalem Vehicular Terror Attack

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

The 25-year-old man who was hit by a car last night in Jerusalem, in what is suspected to have been a terror attack has succumbed to his wounds early Thursday morning, according to Hadassah Hospital.

The victimn has been identified as Shalom Yochai Cherki.

Cherki worked as a tour guide during the day, and was a counselor at Yeshiva Ben-Tzvi in the evenings.

Cherki’s father, Uri, is a well-known Rabbi at Machon Meir, and his brother, Yair, is a Channel 2 reporter on Hareidi and religious affairs.

The funeral will be held on Thursday.

The second victim, a 20 year old woman, is still in serious condition. Prayers can be said for Shira bat Adel Ada.

The two were injured when an Arab driver drove into them as they waited at a bus stop in French Hill, Jerusalem.

Eye witnesses claim the driver aimed for the people in the bus stop.

The driver, 37 from New Anata in Jerusalem, who was lightly injured, claims it was an accident. He is currently also recovering in the hospital.

The Shabak are investigating the incident and considering all possibilities, though at this point they highly suspect it was a vehicular terror attack.

IDF Helicopter Saves Palestinian Authority Baby after Heart Attack

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

An IDF helicopter evacuated a six-month-old baby to Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem Saturday morning after the child suffered an apparent heart attack while on the way to Jordan for medical care.

Israeli border officials saw the baby collapse and called paramedics, who in turn sent an urgent call for a military helicopter.

Magen David medics arrived at the scene and, along with IDF doctors, resuscitated the child, but the medical staff decided he needed to be flown to a hospital immediately.

Transportation was coordinated with the IDF’s COGAT (Coordination of Government Activities in the Territories) unit, and the baby now is under care at Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital.

We would like to presume that the family is appreciative of Israel’s efforts.


Five Firebombs Thrown at Hadassah Hospital

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

Unknown assailants threw five firebombs at Hadassah Hospital – Mount Scopus, on Saturday, according to Walla news.

The firebombs were thrown at the back entrance to the hospital, which faces Jerusalem’s Issawiya neighborhood.

No injuries or damage were reported.

Police searched for culprits.

In September, police arrested and charged 4 Issawiya residents for the burning down a French Hill gas station during Arab rioting.

Wind-Whipped Fires in Jerusalem Threaten Yad VaShem Holocaust Memorial

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Two wind-whipped brushfires in forests near Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital Wednesday afternoon forced the evacuation of hundreds of people and  threaten to engulf  the Yad VaShem Holocaust Memorial Center and Museum, located on the nearby hill of Mt. Herzl.

At least six planes and more than two dozen crews of firefighters on the ground are battling the fire, which has engulfed some houses in the Ein Kerem area . The blaze has forced the evacuation of other families as well as workers and visitors at Yad VaShem and the Kiryat Yovel neighborhood, where homes already have suffered heavy smoke damage.

Light rail service to Mr. Herzl has been suspended, streets have been closed, and traffic was temporarily suspended in both directions on Highway 1, the major artery linking Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Police also have closed off part the alternate Tel-Aviv-Jerusalem road, highway 443.

Firefighters in Judea and Samaria rushed to the capital to join the battle to contain the inferno.

Families who were forced to flee their homes in Ein Kerem have been evacuated to the Malcha office and commercial complex in southern Jerusalem. A second fire is burning out of control in the nearby Nataf neighborhood, where families have been evacuated to a moshav.

Several people have been treated for smoke inhalation.

The cause of the fire is not yet known, but several previous blazes in the area have been set intentionally by Arabs.

fire tazpit

Hadassah Crisis Opens Divisions Between the Hospital and Women’s Organization

Friday, March 21st, 2014

JERUSALEM (JTA) — The Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower stretches 223 feet skyward, welcoming visitors in a bright, expansive lobby strung with banners celebrating both the State of Israel and its premier hospital, the Hadassah Medical Organization.

Opened in late 2012 at a total cost of $363 million, the tower is the largest building project undertaken at Hadassah in 50 years and a symbol of the hospital’s ambitions for the future.

Now that future is in peril as the hospital, saddled with nearly $370 million in debt and an annual deficit exceeding $85 million, struggles to chart a course back to solvency.

Last month, Hadassah hospital declared bankruptcy after two large Israeli banks cut off its credit lines. The Jerusalem District Court gave the hospital a 90-day stay of protection from creditors, after which the medical organization will be restructured or liquidated.

Both the Israeli government and the Hadassah Women’s Zionist Organization of America, which built the hospital and partially funds it, have agreed to provide $14 million in emergency funding to help weather the crisis. Amid the financial tumult, the hospital staff went on strike for two weeks. “This is a crisis that had its origins a long time ago,” said Avigdor Kaplan, who became the hospital’s director-general last year. “Now it’s gotten to a point where it can’t go on.”

Founded in 1939, Hadassah is widely regarded as one of Israel’s finest health care facilities, pushing the boundaries of medical research while providing first-rate treatment not only for Israelis, but often for patients from around the Middle East, including citizens of countries technically in a state of war with the Jewish state.

The institution, which employs 6,000 people and doubles as the main teaching hospital for the Hebrew University medical school, is a symbol of both the best in Israeli medicine and the American Jewish contribution to building the state.

But with the budgetary woes impossible to ignore any longer, rifts have opened among the hospital, the Israeli government and the women’s organization. All the parties agree that the hospital must change the way it does business, but they remain divided on the source of the crisis, who is at fault and how best to move forward.

The government has pointed to employee salaries, which it says are “significantly higher” than typical pay at Israeli hospitals. The women’s organization blames long-term financial mismanagement, describing hospital administrators as children who expect that someone will always be there to bail them out. Hospital officials blame government regulations that they say penalize them for providing the country’s best care.

Diagnosing the problem will be critical to the hospital’s recovery, but no explanation has been complete. Soon after a Feb. 11 Knesset committee hearing on the crisis, the health and finance ministries appointed a joint panel to investigate. Recommendations are expected to be released this month.

In Kaplan’s view, the hospital’s problems stem from a bad deal the hospital was pressured into reaching with Israel’s government-funded health insurance companies. Israeli hospitals typically give volume discounts to the companies in an effort to attract more business, but Hadassah’s appear to be larger than the average.

In 2013, the hospital gave the insurance companies an average discount of 26 percent. A 2010 government report found that the nationwide average that year was 18 percent.

According to Kaplan, the arrangement effectively penalizes Hadassah for performing more complex and expensive procedures. As a private hospital, Kaplan said Hadassah also covers employee pensions and malpractice insurance that at public hospitals are paid for by the government.

“The government didn’t take care of us as it should have,” Kaplan said. “They gave overly large discounts to the providers, even though we give the same kind of service to Israelis.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/hadassah-crisis-opens-divisions-between-the-hospital-and-womens-organization/2014/03/21/

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