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May 27, 2015 / 9 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Herzliya’

‘Big Apple’ Tim Cook to Visit Israel Next Week

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Apple CEO Tim Cook is scheduled to arrive in Israeli next week to launch his company’s new Israeli headquarters near Tel Aviv, Globes reported.

Israeli high-tech honchos and former President Shimon Peres at the inauguration in Herzliya, part of the Israeli version of Silicon Valley.

The Apple center will employ up to 800 people for development, marketing and sales. Apple has bought out two Israeli companies and hired their workers, as well as 150 employees laid off last year by Texas Instruments.

Shalit Prisoner Found in Herzliya

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

One of the terrorists released in the Gilad Shalit deal was found illegally residing in Herzliya on Monday, along with a group of 12 Palestinian Authority Arabs, according to a YNet report.

The terrorist had originally been arrested in connection to a shooting.

Police Disinter PA Arabs Sleeping Peacefully in Herzliya Graves

Sunday, November 23rd, 2014

For the past few weeks, police in central Israel have been searching for the locations where Palestinian Authority Arab are sleeping when illegally staying overnight in the Tel Aviv area, according to a Tazpit report.

Palestinian Authority citizens with work permits are required to return to the PA controlled areas at night, but many don’t — creating a security risk.

Others, illegally cross the Green Line for work, thievery or as we’ve unfortunately and repeatedly experienced lately, deadly terror attacks.

Following some leads, the police began to search the area’s cemeteries, but found no signs of illegal PA Arabs, or that anyone else for that matter was living in the cemeteries.

On Saturday night, once again following a citizen’s reports of having seen Arabs in the Herzliya cemetery, police set up a stakeout, but despite the hours they spent in the graveyard, they still couldn’t find any illegal PA Arabs.

At the end of the stakeout, the police decided to check the inside of the vertical cemetery section currently under construction.

Israel has been building vertically tiered cemeteries in recent years to save space. Vertical cemeteries are concrete graves vaults or niches that are stacked horizontally side by side, and then vertically one on top of the other.

They found the first few niches empty, but when they continued to look, they found indications that someone was using the grave vaults for storage.

To their surprise, they then discovered the rest of the tombs were being used by the PA Arabs as overnight sleeping quarters and storage units.

Not much different than the Japanese sleeping pods being considered in Tel Aviv – but without the amenities or hostel fees.

Japanes pod hotel

Seven PA Arabs without work or entry permits, and some of them with stolen goods on them, were found sleeping peacefully in their graves.

Needless to say, they were disinterred and arrested.

Research and Academic Teaching of Terrorism in Israel and in the World

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

In recent years, academic research institutes and programs for the study of terrorism and homeland security have been established in many countries. This occurred due to a need to better understand terrorism, its roots and motivations, and in an attempt to improve policies for dealing with this dangerous worldwide phenomenon. The academic interest in terrorism dates back to the mid-1900s and the development of modern terrorism, but the number of academics who dealt with this phenomenon was small – comprising an academic community of a few dozed researchers mostly from academia in the United States, Europe and Israel. 9/11 – the deadliest terrorist attack in history, carried out on September 11, 2001 in the U.S. – marked the beginning of a world revolution in dealing with terrorism as a whole, with many governments devoting efforts and resources to increase their abilities to counter terrorism, and to recruit the business sector and technology companies in order to find an effective response to this serious threat to the world’s well-being. At the same time, the academic world was undergoing a revolution – numerous researchers chose to deal with issues related to terrorism and homeland security, universities designed special courses and curricula on the topic and large numbers of students showed interest in studying the field, aiming to develop a career in this area in government and security agencies, in the public and business sectors and in academia.

The academic revolution was ignited with the foundation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the United States, established in response of the failures that preceded 9/11. The DHS quickly became one of the largest U.S. government offices, employing approximately 250,000 people, and under its auspices the Science & Technology Directorate Office of University Programs (OUP) was established. As part of its mission, the OUP “builds a stable community of homeland security researchers and educators at U.S. colleges and universities, and fosters a homeland security culture within the academic community through research and educational programs.” To achieve these goals the OUP established 12 centers of excellence for academic research and teaching in the fields of terrorism and homeland security in universities across the U.S. Some of these centers are a consortium of several universities and each center has a specific area of responsibility as defined by the DHS. Thus, for example, the University of Southern California leads the Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE); the center led by the University of Maryland (START) deals with the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. The other DHS centers of excellence located in various U.S. universities deal, among other, with research of Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response, Explosives-Related Threats, Microbial Risk Assessment, Border Security and Immigration, Animal Disease Defense, Food Protection, Maritime Security, National Transportation Security, Coastal Hazards, and Visualization and Data Analytics.

One of the first centers of excellence in the world devoted to the research and teaching of terrorism is the International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) established at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in 1996; it preceded the U.S. academic trend by five years. The Institute, that brought together the best academic minds and practitioners in the field of terrorism, quickly became one of the leading centers of excellence for the research of terrorism in the world. The Institute researchers and fellows were integrated in unique English language study programs developed at the Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy and teach in a special MA track in Government with the unique specialization for counter terrorism and homeland security and in special BA clusters in Hebrew and English. These popular programs attract dozens of international honor students who come to Israel from the best universities all over the world intending to develop and advance their academic and practical careers in the field of counter terrorism.

IDC’s Combined Degree in Law and Business

Monday, October 21st, 2013

The world is not only getting smaller – it’s getting hungrier, too!

With international commerce getting more competitive, resources dwindling, banks defaulting and world terror a constant threat, nations often find themselves competing in the board room or before a magistrate rather than in the battlefield – led by lawyers rather than generals. Thus, today’s business lawyer must be an expert in international trade and regulations, and a business major must be able to perform in a globalized economy – notwithstanding language and local predilections.

Prof. Sharon Rabin-Margalioth, Dean of the Radzyner School of Law at IDC Herzliya has studied law on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. “In business, local expertise is insufficient; there is a growing need for international business law expertise and the ability to cope with the challenges of globalization. That’s why we’ve established an innovative new program that provides students with significant added value in law and business.”

IDC’s combined degree in Law & Business Administration program focuses on global legal principles. Taught in English, students acquire an in-depth knowledge of international business law and the tools required to integrate into the international legal world and the global business sphere.

US Supreme Court Justice Brandeis once observed that a lawyer who is not proficient in economic theory poses a danger to the public. Today, that assertion would state that one cannot function in a global sphere without an interdisciplinary understanding of geopolitical processes and the realities of any region in which we desire to act.

In law, as in commerce one must draw upon experience and extensive knowledge to solve any problem at hand. One must interpret and utilize social norms and translate these into legal and commercial dispositions. The Radzyner School of Law provides students with that knowledge base and the ability to analyze problems and place them into an appropriate context – an impressive challenge, given the intricate nature of language and human disposition.

Students develop their analytical skills, a creative imagination, a sensitivity for others, and the ability to express themselves in any situation. They also engage in diverse practical experiences, acquire 21st century skills and directly interact with leading figures in the legal practice and academic world from both Israel and abroad. The nine semester curriculum (four years and an additional summer semester) includes law, business and specialized courses integrating the two.

The program is offered by the IDC’s Raphael Recanati International School.

Jonathan Davis who is both Vice-President for External Relations and head of the RRIS is a firm believer in the IDC’s mission of statement: “We are Zionists – here to contribute to Israel and to the Jewish People,” he stresses.” We strive to build bridges between the elites and the underprivileged, between Israelis and the Diaspora, between Israel and its neighbors.”

And, indeed, one of the main goals of the combined degree in International Business Law and Business Administration is to create a truly international learning experience. Students from 86 different countries make up more than a quarter of the student body; and the IDC’s internationally renowned faculty roster reflects both scholarly excellence and practical experience.

“We are constantly expanding the school’s international focus and developing new and exciting opportunities for our students to explore on a global level,” Davis adds.

The Radzyner School of Law is also one of the founding members of the Law Schools Global League – an international alliance between more than twenty law schools, which fosters collaborative relations and offers students the opportunity to study abroad for one semester as part of an extensive student exchange program.

IDC is located in Herzliya, a city six miles north of Tel Aviv along the Mediterranean’s white sandy beach. Besides a host of recreational facilities, the area has been nicknamed Silicon Wadi – attracting the world’s leading venture-capital firms alongside Israeli software and biotech companies, many of them traded on international stock exchanges. When established in 1994, IDC was the first major private educational institution in Israel. Today, with 25 research centers and more than 60 exchange programs with leading universities around the world, IDC employs a truly international and distinctly interdisciplinary approach, allowing students to obtain an education that is comprehensive on so many levels and practical.

Hoard of 1,500-Year-Old Coins Found in Ancient Garbage Dump

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Archaeologists and researchers are trying to figure out why a recently found treasure of 1,500-year-old coins and other artifacts was buried in Byzantine era refuse pits.

The excavations, on behalf of the Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority, are being carried out prior to expanding the city of Herzliya, immediately north of Tel Aviv.

Numerous finds dating to the Late Byzantine period of the 5th-7th centuries were among the antiquities discovered in excavations conducted in the agricultural hinterland of the ancient city of Apollonia-Arsuf, located east of the site.

Among the finds uncovered are installations for processing the agricultural produce such as wine presses, and what also might be the remains of an olive press, as well as remains of walls that were apparently part of the ancillary buildings that were meant to serve local farmers.

“The most intriguing find in the area is a number of Byzantine refuse pits,” said Tel Aviv University Prof. Oren Tal and Moshe Ajami of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

“One of them is especially large – more than 100 feet in diameter –  and contained fragments of pottery vessels, fragments of glass vessels, industrial glass waste and animal bones.

“In the midst of the many shards that were discovered in the big refuse pit was a large amount of usable artifacts, whose presence in the pit raises questions. Among other things, more than four hundred coins were found which are mostly Byzantine, including one gold coin, as well as two hundred whole and intact Samaritan lamps, among them lamps that were never used, rings and gold jewelry.”

Noteworthy among the jewelry is an octagonal ring with parts of verses from the Samaritan Pentateuch engraved in Samaritan script on each of its sides. One side reads, “Adonai is his name,” and another side reads, “One God….”

Approximately a dozen Samaritan rings have been published so far in scientific literature, and this ring constitutes an important addition given the assemblage in which it was discovered.

The excavation site once served as the agricultural hinterland of Apollonia-Arsuf, which is located west of the excavation area and what is today the Apollonia National Park. Archaeological excavations conducted there from the 1950s until the present indicate that the site was inhabited continuously for more than 1,500 years – from the Persian period  in the late 6th century BCE until the end of the Crusader period in the 13th century CE.

$100,000 in Gold Found in Israel Crusader Fortress

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

One of the largest-ever gold caches located in Israel was discovered by Tel Aviv University and the Nature and Parks Authority in a dig in the Apollonia National Park near Herzliya.

400 grams of gold – 108 gold coins minted around the year 1,000 in Egypt and valued at over $100,000 – was found last week in  by a TAU student in a potsherd under the tiles of one room of a Crusader fortress conquered by the Mamluks.

The find is part of a three-year excavation in which hundreds of arrow heads and catapult stones have been found, evidence of the mighty battle between the Crusaders and the Mamluks.

Rare glass utensils and Italian shards have also been found.

The coastal fortress and adjacent city were part of the Knights Hospitaller’s most important strongholds.  In 1265, Mamluk Sultan Baybars attacked the city and captured it in a 40 day siege.

Researchers believe the gold was hidden by a Crusader leader, in hopes that the fortress would be ultimately be retaken from the Muslim invaders and the treasure restored to its Christian owners.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/100000-in-gold-found-in-israel-crusader-fortress/2012/07/08/

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