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April 24, 2014 / 24 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Hotovely’

Likud Lawmaker Aims to Block Rumored Comeback by Olmert

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Likud Party lawmaker Tzipi Hotovely reportedly petitioned Israel’s Central Elections Committee to prevent former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert from running for office.

Israel’s Army Radio reported that Hotovely asked committee chair Elyakim Rubinstein, a Supreme Court justice and former attorney general, to disqualify Olmert, the former leader of the centrist Kadima Party, from contending in the upcoming elections because of his conviction in July for breach of trust during a stint as minister of trade and industry.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Likud said Israel would hold early elections early next year.

“It is inconceivable that Olmert be allowed to run for office in this situation, as elections are meant to increase the public’s trust in the political system, not diminish it,” Army Radio quoted Hotovely as saying in explaining her request.

In convicting and handing Olmert a suspended sentence, the court did not state that his offenses carried moral turpitude, which would have barred him from running. Olmert was cleared of more serious allegations of corruption that had forced him to resign in 2008.

Yoel Hasson of Kadima said that Hotovely’s request showed “Likud was panicking” because of the prospect of Olmert returning to public life.

Dalia Itzik, another Kadima lawmaker, said the party’s current leader, Shaul Mofaz, should step down and be replaced by Olmert.

Speaking with Army Radio, former Kadima minister Haim Ramon said he was talking to Olmert and former Kadima chairwoman Tzipi Livni about possibly forming a new political party. Ramon added, however, that Olmert has not yet made a decision on whether to return to politics.

Evolution Vs. Revolution in Struggle over Haredi Draft

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

The Knesset was humming with the sound of bells on Wednesday as the call to vote for an equal service bill filled the building.

“You have a responsibility to contribute to your country, to the state that you get benefits from,” FM Avigdor Liberman’s Yisrael Beytenu spokesperson said. “Those who serve will receive.”

The proposed bill was shot down by a 74-20 vote.

The opposition in large part came from the Haredim. Avraham Chasida, 32, is a Chassid from Jerusalem and an army veteran. He believes that the army is a method for protecting the Jewish people. In turn, he also said that continuing to learn Torah is the only way the Jewish people will really be protected.

Chasida set up a tent in Wohl Rose Park outside of the Knesset in protest of the new bill. He explained that there has already been a natural increase in army service in the Ultra Orthodox community without force or punishment. In 2007, 305 Haredi men were serving, and in 2011 that number has increased to 2,372. The sentiment was a confusion at changing something that is already working.

“Don’t just be right, be smart,” he said. “After 64 years, you can’t take people and turn it around and switch it in one shot.”

Knesset members are also aware that the transition must be smooth. “We can’t have a revolution, we have to have evolution,” MK Tzipi Hotovely said, adding that the Army needs to be prepared for the Haredim just as much as the Haredim need to be ready for service.

However, time is of the essence, and not only because of the August 1 deadline posed by the Supreme Court. Hotovely said that the window of opportunity exists now – because in the near future Knesset representation will change.

A spokesperson for Yisrael Beytenu echoed her statement. “We’ve had 64 years to evolve,” he said. “Demographically, it will be impossible to pass this bill 20 years from now.”

Prime Minister Netanyahu is now working on a bill that is quite similar to the Tal Law, and if all goes well, should be passed before the end of the month.

Israel’s Bold New Voice

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

An exciting newcomer has arrived in the turbulent arena of Israeli politics. In her fiery speech during the recent countdown ceremony in the Revava settlement that marked the end of the ten-month moratorium on construction in Judea and Samaria, Tzipi Hotovely seized the moment. She eloquently encouraged the synthesis, so long deferred, between Judaism and Zionism. Even in her first term in the Knesset, at the age of 31 and its youngest member, her future impact already seems assured.

Passionately and articulately, Hotovely insisted that “the only government to rule this land is the government of Israel.” The Likud, she noted, “was not established to build a Palestinian state.” It must not support “any diplomatic process that destroys the Zionist enterprise in Judea and Samaria.”

Not since the days of Geula Cohen has such a forceful female voice – perhaps any voice – been heard in the Knesset asserting that the biblical homeland still belongs to the Jewish people within the state of Israel.

Who is Tzipi Hotovely and what has propelled her rapid political ascent? The daughter of immigrants from Georgia (Russia), she grew up in Rechovot, studied in the Ulpanit Bnei Akiva high school in Tel Aviv, received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in law at Bar-Ilan University, and became a lawyer in 2003 before entering a Ph.D. program at Tel Aviv University.

The Gaza disengagement, which she described as “a disaster, a Jewish-Israeli anti-democratic move against its own voters,” marked her political awakening. A year later she made her debut as the only religious right-winger on the popular political debate program “Moetzet HaHamim” (Council of Sages) and became a contributing columnist for Ma’ariv. One impressed television viewer was Benjamin Netanyahu, who invited her to join the Likud.

Describing her election to the Knesset a year ago as “hashgacha pratit” (divine providence), Hotovely has called for “a politics of values and ideology.” Her bedrock principle is: “Bring ideas and views; don’t play the game, don’t compromise.” In a political culture dominated for more than sixty years by secular men eager to compromise Israel’s biblical legacy, her passionate religious Zionism has the potential to transform Israeli politics.

Interviewed by The Jewish Press in July 2009, Hotovely stated bluntly: “Oslo is not an issue anymore because everyone knows the [peace] process failed and everyone is looking for a new way.” She expressed her belief that Netanyahu “will bring that new approach” even though, as interviewer Sara Lehmann pointed out, he had relinquished nearly all of Hebron to the Palestinian Authority during his first term as prime minister.

Any new approach seems far likelier to come from Hotovely than from Netanyahu, squeezed as he is by the United States to make ever more concessions to the Palestinians and likely, sooner or later, to oblige. In recent months, she has begun to circulate her ideas about the settlements, which currently agitate everyone from President Obama to President Ahmadinejad – and, not incidentally, about the future of the Jewish state.

“What is Zionism all about?” she asked rhetorically in her Jewish Press interview. Her answer: “Zionism is really about going back to Zion, going back to Jerusalem, going back to all those biblical places. We need to start talking about the peace process without removing people from the settlements.”

But how, exactly, can that be done? Early last month, Hotovely presented to the Likud Central Committee her proposal to annex Judea and Samaria and give full Israeli citizenship to all its Arab residents. The idea of “one state for two peoples” came from Uri Elitzur, formerly Netanyahu¹s bureau chief and now deputy editor of Makor Rishon, who introduced it last year at a conference organized by Hotovely.

To date, her one-state solution has received little, and at best tepid, support. But it rests on the reality that since Oslo – indeed, since the Peel Commission partition plan of 1937 – Palestinians have not accepted any partition offer short of Israeli self-dissolution. Nor can Israel muster its superior military power to have its way because, she says, “the world won’t accept inevitable pictures of dead children.” Therefore, Israel should begin to annex Judea and Samaria in stages, starting with the large settlement blocs and the Jordan Valley, where few Palestinians live and where Israel requires a security barrier.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/israels-bold-new-voice/2010/10/06/

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