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September 25, 2016 / 22 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘terror’

Hamas Terror Cell that Murdered Rabbi Mark Blown Up with Rockets [video]

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Now it can be revealed that a collaboration of Shabak, the IDF and Israel Police has exposed over the past few weeks a Hamas terror infrastructure that, among other things, carried out the Highway 60 murder of Rabbi Michael Mark Z”L and injured his family members on July 1, 2016 near the community of Otniel in Judea and Samaria. An overnight raid Tuesday that followed a lengthy manhunt resulted in the killing of the Mark murder perpetrator Mohammed Fakieh.

The arrest raid in the village of Tzurif near Hebron picked up Mohammed Ah Magid Amaira, who carried out the attack with Fakieh, and several other cell members, including several relatives, who provided support to the cell, including giving Fakieh et al shelter during the manhunt.

The driver of the terror cell who drove the car in the attack is a Palestinian Authority policeman.

The raid of the safe house where Fakieh was hiding was carried out by the IDF Etzion Division, as well as Shabak and Police. The terrorist opened fire on the force as it drew near, and in response the force shot several anti-tank rockets at the structure where he was hiding, then demolished the house using heavy machinery and killed the terrorist. They found a Kalashnikov sub-machine gun and an improvised grenade near the body.

An Arab woman who was injured during the raid was evacuated to hospital.

During the raid, a high power line near Tzurif was damaged which supplies electricity to the Gush Etzion area, and specifically to the regional water pumps. As a result, the Gush Etzion and Efrat water tanks are low, and residents have been asked to minimize their use of water until the electric company can fix the line.

David Israel

Bennett Rebukes Netanyahu on Misrepresenting Terror Tunnel Record

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

Education Minister and Habayit Hayehudi Chairman Naftali Bennett on Tuesday morning tweeted a response to the statement by Prime Minster Benjamin Netanyahu Monday night, that the security cabinet discussed the Gaza terror tunnels before the 2014 Protective Edge Operation. Bennett said Netanyahu should accept responsibility for the ramifications of his decisions, not try to conceal them.

“Any company commander in the army learns his lessons at the end of an exercise, to avoid making future mistakes, and what’s true for an infantry company is doubly true for the political and security leadership of the State of Israel,” Bennett tweeted. “In preparation for the next war, we must learn from the mistakes of the past and not deny them. Drawing real lessons is a sign of strength and self-confidence. He who does not learn from the mistakes of the past is doomed to repeat them,” Bennett concluded.

Netanyahu has been saying in closed sessions that the IDF had been seeking operational solutions to the terror tunnels since 2013, and the security apparatus had dealt with it numerous times. The PM was responding to the harsh attacks on his administration’s conduct of the 2014 Gaza War.

On Sunday, 32 bereaved families of fallen IDF soldiers in Gaza demanded in a letter to Prime Minister Netanyahu and Defense Minister Liberman that a state commission headed by a judge investigate the government’s decision-making process throughout the war.

Bennett stood out during the war weeks as the most stubborn advocate of sending the IDF in to demolish the Hamas terror tunnels, and was behind the popular notion that the Netanyahu security cabinet was unaware of the tunnel threat. But Walla, which in recent years has emerged as Netanyahu’s other favorite media outlet, reported on Tuesday that the cabinet held at least eight debates on the tunnels, and hosted 20 professional discussions with IDF and Intelligence officials to examine ways to locate and demolish the tunnels.

JNi.Media

Turkish Parliament Approves 3-Month State of Emergency

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

The Turkish Parliament approved a three-month state of emergency Thursday by a vote of 346-115. The last state of emergency in Turkey lasted from July 1987 to November 2002.

The approval came hours after the government declared the state of emergency late Wednesday (July 20), “in order to eliminate the terror organization which attempted to make a coup, swiftly and completely,” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced.

The state of emergency allows law enforcement officers to shot individuals who violate surrender orders or attempt to exchange fire — or in self-defense.

Detentions can be extended beyond 48 hours, which is the normal maximum for detentions before suspects must be tried by a court under the Turkish Constitution.

A state of emergency allows authorities to impose limited or full crfews and to prevent gatherings, impose travel bans at certain times and in various places.

Body, vehicle and property searches and seizure of potential evidence has been authorized, and people have been ordered to carry identification with them at all times.

The government has been authorized to ban publication, distribution and replication of newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, books and leaflets, and to seize publications that were banned before.

Controlling, recording and banning certain speeches, scripts, pictures, films, records, theaters and films — as well as audio and image records and all audio-related broadcasts have also been authorized.

Individuals and groups can be blocked from entering certain places, and removed from others; public gatherings and meetings, marches and parades can be banned or postponed. Operations of association can also be stopped.

Erdogan urged Turkish citizens to be wary of “speculations,” according to an article posted on the Turkish Hurriyet Daily News website. He added the state of emergency was not synonymous with martial law.

“Restrictions on rights and liberties during the state of emergency are not in question. There is no such thing. We guarantee it,” Erdogan said.

But the move has already had an effect on everyday Turkish citizens: a Turkish business contact who was slated to travel to the United States abruptly “postponed” those plans, citing “recent developments in Turkey.”

In a brief email to a source who requested anonymity out of concern for his safety, the contact said he could not say when he might be able to reschedule. The source told JewishPress.com he was so concerned for his friend’s safety, he could not even respond with an email to ask for details about the family or what was happening in the company.

Hana Levi Julian

The Walter Bingham File – A Week I’d Rather Forget: Turkey, Terror, Tactics and Tyranny [audio]

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Now: The dust has settled on the agreement with Turkey, and an analysis of it in this programme shows that Israel drew the short straw.

And: Israel’s quiet diplomacy and trade arrangements brought results with our newfound friends – India, China and Central Africa.

Walter discusses: Why America’s Second Amendment is outdated and counter-productive.

You’ll hear: About the convulsions in UK politics.

Also: Is YouTube biased? Hear what’s going on there.

Plus: The late-breaking news of another barbaric terrorist attack in France. Walter discusses the underlying causes.

With: Much more.

The Walter Bingham File 17Jul – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

When the Victims of Terror Are Not Jews

Monday, July 18th, 2016

{Originally posted to the Aish website}

Nice has till now been world renowned as the capitol of the French Riviera. Founded by the Greeks long ago, it became a resort for the elite – the cultured, the artistic, the sophisticated, the liberals and the intellectuals who gloried in its symbolic status as paradigm of 21st century paradise.

Today Nice has joined the geographic list of monuments to the tragedy of terrorism. The names of the cities stand as powerful reminders of the universal threat to civilized society. It is no longer just Jerusalem or Tel Aviv. It is Paris and Brussels, San Bernardino and Orlando, Istanbul and Dhaka.

And so we have come full circle.

For years now Europe has been in the forefront of those justifying Palestinian atrocities – terrorist acts of murder of innocents, of slayings of Jews at prayer, children asleep in their bedrooms, mothers in front of their children – all deemed permissible with the torturous logic that people who believe they have no other alternative are morally permitted to carry out brutal and barbaric violence.

Is wholesale murder in fact ever tolerable because the executioners are convinced that their ultimate goal is noble?

But surely now the world needs to ask the question: When does terrorism cease to be terrorism? Is wholesale murder in fact ever tolerable because the executioners are convinced that their ultimate goal is noble? Is there any possible vindication for driving a truck into a crowd of celebrants of Bastille Day, supposedly to distribute free ice cream to the revelers, viciously killing and injuring small children as well as hundreds of others in its path?

I ask because the response to the tragedy in Nice has been notable for the kind of words which its spokespersons previously so often made clear they do not believe.

Listen to the leading Muslim clerics who united in condemning the attack and calling for a joint struggle against extremism because, as they piously exclaim, they are opposed to extremism in any form.

Listen to United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan who said: “This heinous terrorist crime makes it imperative for all to work decisively and without hesitation to counter terrorism in all its forms and manifestations.”

Listen to Sunni Islam’s leading center of learning, Al-Azhar which said the “vile terrorist attack” contradicted Islam and urged the world to unite efforts “to defeat terrorism and rid the world of its evil”.

Listen to Iran which also decried the “criminal terrorist incident” in Nice. “As we have repeatedly said before, terrorism is an evil phenomenon that will only be eradicated through international unity and collaboration,” foreign ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi said.

Senior Egyptian Muslim cleric Shawki Allam condemned the assailant as an “extremist.” “People who commit such ugly crimes are corrupt of the Earth, and follow in the footsteps of Satan… and are cursed in this life and in the hereafter.”

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi denounced “in the strongest terms the vile terrorist attack,” his office said.

Arab League chief Ahmed Abul Gheit condemned the “craven terrorist attack,” his spokesman said.

What happened in Nice is not nice because it was the kind of violence whose victims weren’t Jews, whose targets weren’t Israelis. But when it is a marketplace in Tel Aviv or a bedroom in Kiryat Arba terrorism appears to lose its obscene stench for all the hypocritical mouthpieces of moderation who would like us to believe they are opposed in principle to murder inspired by fanatic motives and targeted at innocent victims.

It is both strange and appalling that at one and the same time the world could condemn with great fervor the fanaticism of terrorism against some nations while continuing to justify those very crimes against those for whom they share hatred and animosity. And it is precisely because of this hypocrisy – the implicit belief that “my terrorism is not your terrorism” – that civilization is so powerfully imperiled.

How long will the world praise terrorists in one corner of the globe and assume it won’t become victimized everywhere else?

The Jewish calendar long-ago cautioned us about the danger of this approach. The most tragic day of the year for Jews is the ninth of Av, Tisha B’Av. It was the exact day on which both of the temples were destroyed. It is a day of fasting and mourning, meant to ensure we never forget the tragic events it commemorates as well as our spiritual failings which contributed to the terrible events of this day. But what is a remarkable is that three weeks before the ninth of Av, this coming Sunday, we observe an additional day of fasting and mourning. It is the 17th of Tammuz. On that day the Temple was not yet destroyed. Yet it needs to be equally remembered because that is the day on which the walls of Jerusalem were breached. It was the beginning of the end – and the beginning of our downfall needs to be recalled as much as the day of final tragedy.

It is a message of great contemporary relevance. The day when the walls first fell, which allowed for all that followed, was when the world failed to respond to terrorism even though it wasn’t their house that was burning nor their children who were brutalized; when it was Tel Aviv and not Paris, when it was Jerusalem and not Istanbul, when it was just Jews celebrating a Passover Seder in the seaside resort of Netanya and not proud French citizens in the beautiful capital of the Riviera.

Terrorism didn’t appear to be such a terrifying threat when the wall of civilized behavior was first overrun. But inexorably the 17th of Tammuz is followed by Tisha B’Av. Evil un-confronted and un-challenged has taken the first step to victory.

How long will the world fail to understand this? How long will the world continue to praise terrorists in one corner of the globe and blindly assume it will not become similarly victimized everywhere else?

Our fate rests on the correct answer.

Rabbi Benjamin Blech

17 Palestinian Authority Terror Suspects Arrested

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Israeli security forces captured 17 Arab fugitives late Monday night. They were taken into custody on charges of terrorism and violence against civilians and security forces.

In the course of the night’s operations, IDF soldiers found and confiscated a variety of weapons, including stun grenades, handguns, ammunition, and fireworks.

The arrests were made in various locations across Judea and Samaria during operations by IDF special operations units.

All suspects were transferred to security personnel for interrogation.

Hana Levi Julian

Is Barack Obama Responsible For The Dallas Anti-Cop Terror Attack?

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

{Originally posted to the author’s website, The Daily Wire}

On Thursday, President Obama reacted to the cell-phone-captured footage of the police killings of Alton Sterling in Louisiana and Philando Castile by suggesting that such killings were “not isolated incidents.” Instead, he said, “They are symptomatic of challenges within our criminal justice system, the racial disparities that appear across the system year after year, and the resulting lack of trust that exists between law enforcement and too many of the communities they serve.”

In effect, Obama said – just as he’s been saying for years – that what he believes are extrajudicial murders of black men by police officers are the result of systemic racism, reflected in disproportionate arrest and imprisonment statistics.

Then, on Thursday night, anti-white racist snipers began firing on white police officers in Dallas. When the smoke had cleared, five officers were dead and another seven were wounded, some grievously.

This raises an obvious question: what sort of responsibility does President Obama bear for the massacre?

This isn’t the first time such questions have been raised about leftist anti-cop rhetoric. After the death of Eric Garner in New York City in 2014, New York Mayor Bill De Blasio echoed Obama’s message: “We are dealing with centuries of racism that brought us to this day.” Obama promptly called De Blasio to thank him. De Blasio bragged that he had met Obama at the White House, and said that he had told his son, who is black, “about the dangers he may face” from police. Days later, two police officers in New York City were murdered in cold blood by a black criminal who pledged to put “wings on pigs” on social media. The NYPD turned their backs on De Blasio when he attended the funeral for one of the officers.

Yet the media today – and President Obama himself – blame lack of gun control for Dallas, or claim that motives are unclear. They certainly distance the Black Lives Matter movement from the shootings, even as the Democratic National Committee released a statement essentially lumping together BLM with the anti-cop terrorist attack: “while most protesters have made their voices heard peacefully, tonight’s shooting of officers in Dallas is unacceptable and a reminder that the time to address these tensions and find common ground is long overdue.”

So, what is the relationship between anti-cop rhetoric and the racist murder of cops?

First off, let’s point out the obvious double standard from the left: when a white racist, Dylann Storm Roof, shot up a Charleston black church, the left immediately blamed a widespread culture of racism, and insisted that states across the country tear down Confederate war memorials and stop sponsoring the Confederate flag at state capitols. When non-black cops shoot black suspects, the left insists – without a shred of evidence – that such killings are endemic among police officers, and that the entire system is racist. When anti-Donald Trump protesters riot against Trump supporters, the left blame Trump’s rhetoric. When a nutcase shoots up an area near a Planned Parenthood, the left blames the pro-life movement. When another nutcase shoots Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, the left blames Sarah Palin’s Congressional targets map. But when obvious anti-white racists murder white cops, the left suggests that gun control is the issue; when obvious Islamic terrorists murder gay people in a nightclub in Orlando, the problem is white Christians who don’t support same-sex marriage and Republicans who defend gun rights.

In other words, for the left, rhetoric can only connect with murder when it’s rhetoric they don’t like. If they do like the rhetoric — or at least if they want to defend the people responsible for the rhetoric — then the actual motivation for murder will be [omitted].

But now let’s tackle the real question: when is rhetoric responsible for violence? Rhetoric is responsible for violence when it calls for violence. Radical Islam calls for jihad. Protesters chanting “pigs in a blanket, fry ‘em like bacon” calls for violence against cops. Barack Obama didn’t call for violence against cops.

That said, he did do three things that are particularly despicable:

He denied that murder charges require evidence;
He denied that charges of racism require evidence;
He ignored the actual cause of anti-cop violence.

Obama didn’t cause the Orlando shooting attack, but his failure to label it Islamic jihadism surely stopped America from fighting it properly. Obama didn’t cause the Dallas shootings, but his attempts to turn the conversation toward gun control or police brutality are just another way to avoid a real conversation about anti-white racism.

So no, of course Obama isn’t responsible for the Dallas shootings. But he’s surely responsible for cultivating a racially polarized culture, ignoring the real causes of anti-cop violence, and leaving cops out in the cold to fend for themselves.

Ben Shapiro

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/is-barack-obama-responsible-for-the-dallas-anti-cop-terror-attack/2016/07/12/

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