web analytics
July 24, 2014 / 26 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



Home » InDepth » Monitor »

The Bias Never Sleeps


Media-Monitor-logo

It seems like such a long time ago that lefty writers were pushing the line that not only is there no liberal bias in the media, but in fact it’s conservatives who have a disproportionate influence on the public discourse. Actually, it’s been a mere couple of years since liberals tried making that preposterous case, largely as a reaction to former CBS News correspondent Bernard Goldberg’s surprise bestseller Bias, an insider’s account of how liberal assumptions and prejudices shape the way the mainstream media present the news.The reason you rarely hear talk these days of a conservative media bias is that so much has happened over the past two years to render the idea absurd. Not that there ever was any real basis for the argument, but the relentlessly slanted media coverage of the Iraq occupation and the U.S. presidential election has served to underscore the near total hegemony of liberalism in the media, notwithstanding such phenomena as Fox News and talk radio, two exceptions that prove the rule.

The “60 Minutes” Bush National Guard fiasco is in the headlines again this week, and it’s difficult to recall another incident in which liberal journalists were caught quite this publicly with their pants down.

CBS’s internal investigation resulted in the dismissal of the four individuals deemed most responsible for putting the dubious report on the air last September, but the report denied any political motivation on the part of those involved – a ludicrous claim considering the zeal with which producer Mary Mapes pursued any possible allegation that would damage the president.

Mapes, it was widely reported in the immediate aftermath of the National Guard broadcast, is a passionate liberal with strong opinions; she was obsessed for years with finding something – anything – to discredit Bush’s account of his military service; and she rushed to get a clearly flawed story on the air in the midst of a hotly contested presidential campaign.

How can anyone be expected to believe that it was anything but politics that motivated a woman like this?

Also pink-slipped this week was Josh Howard, the executive producer of the “60 Minutes” midweek edition. Politics may have been the farthest thing from his mind when the decision was made to air the anti-Bush report, but this is hardly a fellow unacquainted with partisan politics.

Prior to his career at CBS, Howard was a staffer for two New York Democrats – former representative Stephen Solarz and Senator Charles Schumer when the latter served as a state assemblyman. And according to federal election reporting records, Howard, already at the time employed by CBS, made financial contributions to Solarz’s last two congressional campaigns in 1990 and 1992.

* * *

The New York Times, writes Joshua Muravchik in “Why the Democrats Keep Losing” in the January issue of Commentary, has made it a habit in recent years to question the existence of a mandate for newly elected presidents – except when the winner is a Democrat.

“In 1980,” Muravchik notes, “when Ronald Reagan bested incumbent President Jimmy Carter by 10 percentage points, the paper’s editors observed that his ‘mandate,’ a word they themselves put in suspicion- arousing quotation marks, had ‘little policy content,’ a position they reiterated four years later when Reagan won reelection over Walter Mondale by a whopping 18 percentage points (a ‘lonely landslide’ and ‘a personal victory with little precise policy mandate’). Nor could the 8-point victory by Bush’s father over Michael Dukakis ‘fairly be called a mandate,’ asserted the paper in 1988.

“Whenever a Democrat has won, by contrast, the Times has perceived things differently. After Bill Clinton’s first victory (by 6 percentage points) in 1992, the editors commented: ‘The test now will be how quickly President-elect Clinton can convert his mandate into momentum.’ When he won reelection (by 8 points) in 1996, it repeated the thought – ‘There can be no question about his mandate’ – and added a little civics lesson: ‘The American people express their clearest opinion about what they want government to do through their choice of chief executive.’ “

About the Author: Jason Maoz is the Senior Editor of The Jewish Press.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “The Bias Never Sleeps”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
U.S. President Barack Obama
FAA Ban on Flights to Israel ‘Worse than BDS’
Latest Indepth Stories
Rabbi Meir Kahane at the National Press Club ~ 1985

Rabbi Kahane spoke of transfer, because it was what the Torah spoke of.

Hamas terrorists in Gaza have been using human shields to protect them from the IDF as they launch rocket attacks against Israel.

There is much I can write you about what is going here, but I am wondering what I should not write. I will start by imagining that I am you, sitting at home in the Los Angeles area and flipping back and forth between the weather, traffic reports, the Ukraine, Mexican illegals and Gaza. No […]

Jews inside Paris synagogue surrounded by protesters throwing rocks, holding bats and chairs.

Should Jews in Europe take more responsibility in self-defense of community and property?

Map_of_the_Continent_of_Europe

Germany’s The Jewish Faith newspaper ominously noted, “We Jews are in for a war after the war.”

The truth is we seldom explore with kids what prayer is supposed to be about.

Almost as one, Jews around the world are acknowledging the day-to-day peril facing ordinary Jews in Israel and the extraordinary service of the IDF in protecting them.

So on the one hand Secretary Kerry makes no bones about who is at fault for the current hostilities: he clearly blames Hamas.

King Solomon said it long ago: “Cast your bread upon the waters” because you don’t know when you’ll hit something. Our job is to do.

The anti-Israel camp does not need to win America fully to its side. Merely to neutralize it would radically alter the balance of power and put Israel in great jeopardy.

We mourn the dead, wish a speedy recovery to the wounded, and pray that God guides the government.

Charges from the court of world public opinion and their refutations.

It is up to our government to ensure that their sacrifices were not made for short-term gains.

Supporting Israel, the only democracy in the Middle East, has become dangerous in Malmo.

Proportionality Doctrine:The greater the military gain the greater the justifiable collateral damage

More Articles from Jason Maoz
Presidential-Seal-062014

These are not necessarily the best all-around biographies or studies of the individual presidents listed (though some rank right up there), but the strongest in terms of exploring presidential attitudes and policies toward Israel.

Clinton-051614

The Clintonan “engagement” liberals remember with such fondness did nothing but embolden Arafat and Hamas and Hizbullah as they witnessed Israel’s only real ally elevate process ahead of policy.

What really makes one wonder about the affinity felt by certain Jews for Grant was the welcome mat he put out for some of the country’s most pernicious anti-Semites.

With 2013 marking half a century since Kennedy’s fateful limousine ride in Dallas, the current revels are exceeding the revisionist frenzies of years past, with a seemingly endless parade of books, articles and television specials designed to assure us that, despite everything that has come to light about him since his death, JFK was a great president, or at least a very good president who would have been great had his life not been so cruelly cut short.

As someone who for the past fifteen years has been writing a column that largely focuses on the news media, I’ve read what is no doubt an altogether unhealthy number of books on the subject. Most of them were instantly forgettable while some created a brief buzz but failed to pass the test of time. And then there were those select few that merited a permanent spot on the bookshelf.

George W. Bush has been getting some positive media coverage lately, with recent polls showing him at least as popular as his successor, Barack Obama, and a big new book about the Bush presidency by New York Times chief White House correspondent Peter Baker (Days of Fire, Doubleday) portraying Bush as a much more hands-on chief executive than his detractors ever imagined.

Readers who’ve stuck with the Monitor over the years will forgive this rerun of sorts, but as we approach the fortieth anniversary of the Yom Kippur War – and with the stench of presidential indecisiveness hanging so heavily over Washington these days – it seemed only appropriate to revisit Richard Nixon’s role in enabling Israel to recover from the staggering setbacks it suffered in the first week of fighting.

Shakespeare had it right. The evil that men do indeed lives after them. Case in point: Nahum Goldmann, who served in a variety of Jewish and Zionist organizational leadership posts from the 1920s through the 1970s.

    Latest Poll

    Israel's Iron Dome Anti-Missile System:





    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/media-monitor/the-bias-never-sleeps/2005/01/12/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: