web analytics
September 4, 2015 / 20 Elul, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Home » Sections » Family »

From The Greatest Heights (Part III)


JewishPress Logo

Life goes on, infertility or not, and there are always social obligations with other couples with children.  People don’t seem to realize that normal conversations among young parents about diapers, colds, pediatricians and babysitters can isolate and even hurt.

I believe people try this to alleviate their own discomfort, but it is important to say, unless it is an accurate familial description, calling a childless couple “uncle” or “aunt” can be very hurtful and insulting.

One of the most delicate areas we faced were the requests to serve as the kvatter at Brissim. Kvatter was a frequent topic of conversation on the ATIME boards when I was active on them a decade ago.  It is wonderful that at the time of their incredible simcha, people think of others who may benefit from the kvatter segulah, but try to think of it from the couple’s perspective.

There is no starker reminder of what is missing from a couple’s life than at a Bris.  Everyone is there to celebrate an occasion that is the focus of that couple’s dreams.  All of the smiling faces and mazal tovs echo around their broken hearts, as they can’t help but wonder if they will ever be able to host such a celebration.

It can be a very trying and painful moment.  Often, your biggest desire is to blend in with the walls and hope no one is reading your thoughts as you brave a smile.  As an integral part of the Bris, however, that is not an option. The kvatter is called and you have nowhere to hide.  Suddenly you are face to face with everything you have ever wished for: a beautiful little child. Your heart breaks, but you haven’t even started yet!

Kvatter is a very public role. With all those thoughts swirling in your head, you have to walk through the shul as the center of attention, holding the baby. Deep down you know that your fertility issues are now the public thoughts or even discussion of everyone in the shul. 

It’s not that the people are ill intentioned (although there are always those obscene yentas), but no one wants their personal challenges to be made public. Nobody wants to be seen as a nebach.  Nobody wants to be the subject of people’s pity as they discuss how many years you have been married without children. 

As a huge sports fan, I used to joke that my wife and I were the DKs (Designated Kvatters), who were often called by people we barely knew.  I firmly believe that all of those people were well intentioned, but it’s hard to describe the dread after the news of the birth of a boy, waiting for that call to be asked to jump in as the DKs. 

There were even times that we did not get the call, where we were regular guests or I was davening in shul, when the father would come running up to me at the last minute and ask me if I wanted to be kvatter.  Well intentioned gestures, I am sure, but to understand our discomfort, just to try imagine the conversation that took place immediately before that offer was made (Chaim is here.  He REALLY needs this segulah!)

Even without the added dimension of infertility, I found kvatter to be a rather intimidating process.  The baby is on a pillow, and even under the best circumstances it can be hard to tell whether the baby is secure or ready to tumble right off.  The baby is held in front, and it can be very hard to navigate a crowded shul, through doors and especially up and down steps. 

My biggest fear was the baby rolling off of the pillow and falling to the ground.  Based on that fear, and to make the process less intimidating, my wife and I had this running joke when we do the “handoff” (she hands me the baby to carry in) that if I drop one, we can be sure we would never get another request to be kvatter

About the Author: Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed is a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant. He is currently working on a book about his collegiate experience. He welcomes comments and feedback at chaimshapiro@aol.com or on his website: http://chaimshapiro.com/


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “From The Greatest Heights (Part III)”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Vice President Biden sports a black kippa while speaking at an Atlanta Conservative synagogue Thursday night.
Biden Tells Atlanta Jews ‘Honest to God, I Don’t Know If I Will Run’ [video]

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/from-the-greatest-heights-part-iii/2013/03/22/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: