web analytics
April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Beit Hanina’

Section of 1,800-Year-Old Road Discovered in Jerusalem

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Archaeological excavation prior to the installation of a drainage pipe has exposed for “the first time…such a finely preserved section of the road in Jerusalem,” the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Tuesday.

The ancient road leading from Yafo [Jaffa] to Jerusalem dates to the Roman period of the 2nd-4th centuries was exposed in the Beit Hanina neighborhood in northern Jerusalem.

The wide road of approximately 26 feet was bounded on both sides by curbstones and was built of large flat stones fitted to each other in order to create a comfortable surface for walking. Some of the pavers were very badly worn, indicating the extensive use that was made of the road, and over the years the road also underwent a series of repairs.

“Several segments of the road were previously excavated by research expeditions of the IAA, but such a finely preserved section of the road has not been discovered in the city of Jerusalem until now ,” according to David Yeger, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

“The Romans attached great importance to the roads in the empire,” he added. “They invested large sums of money and utilized the most advanced technological aids of the period in order to crisscross the empire with roads. These served the government, military, economy and public by providing an efficient and safe means of passage.

“Way stations and roadside inns were built along the roads, as well fortresses in order to protect the travelers. The construction and maintenance of the roads was assigned to military units, but civilians also participated in the work as part of the compulsory labor imposed on them by the authorities.”

The road section that was discovered is part of the imperial network of roads that led to Jerusalem from the coastal plain and which are known from both historical sources and archaeological excavations.

Two main arteries led from Yafo to Jerusalem during the Roman period. One is the road that passes through Bet Horon and the other runs via Sha’ar HaGai, west of Jerusalem. This particular segment belongs to the Bet Horon road. The road began in Yafo and passed through Lod where it split it two different directions: one to Sha’ar HaGai and the other by way of Modi’in along the route of what is today Highway 443 to Bet Horon.

From there the road continued until it merged with the highlands road that led to the Old City of Jerusalem.

Retaliatory Attack in Beit Hanina

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Following an Arab stone throwing attack on at least one Jewish driver near the Beit Hanina neighborhood next to Pisgat Ze’ev in Jerusalem on Thursday, Arab residents of Beit Hanina discovered on Monday that the tires on 21 of their cars had been slashed.

In addition, someone sprayed on a nearby wall, “There won’t be silence on stone throwing”. A Jewish star was painted on at least one van.

Following the terror wave of Arab stone and firebomb throwing that has struck Judea and Samaria, Arab attacks on Jews are also on the rise in certain areas of Jerusalem.

Jerusalem Mayor Kicks Off Arab Street Namings

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat will inaugurate a street in the Arab neighborhood of Beit Hanina on Wednesday in the name of a famous Egyptian singer.

The ceremony at 3:30pm will name the street Umm Kultum, after a beloved Egyptian singer, the daughter of an Imam, who died in 1975.

The naming is part of a project to name all streets in Arab neighborhoods in Jerusalem.  According to a press release by the Government Press Office, many streets in those neighborhoods have never been officially named.  Now, 145 new street names have been approved and will be affixed to roads in Zur Baher, Beit Hanina, Shuafat, Issawiya, Abu-Tor, Silwan, and Ras Al-Amud.

EU Condemns Israel For Returning Property to Owners, Evicting Squatters

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

The European Union on Saturday condemned the eviction of Arab squatters from a house in Beit Hanina on Wednesday, despite an eight-year court case proving that the land they occupied belonged to Jews.

The EU missions in Jerusalem and Ramallah issued a statement on Saturday in which they “condemn the eviction of the Natche family from their home in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Beit Hanina”.

They also stated that they were “deeply concerned by the plans to build a new settlement in the midst of this traditional Palestinian neighborhood.”

The statement follows condemnations of the eviction issued by UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for the Occupied Palestinian Territory Maxwell Gaylard.  “Evictions of Palestinians from their homes and properties in occupied territory contravene international law, including the Fourth Geneva Convention, and should cease,” Gaylard said in a public statement.

The EU’s stance on the ownership of the property comes in contrast to the finding of the courts that the land and two buildings in which the Natche family lived were purchased 35 years ago by a Jew and were also owned by Jewish residents prior to the founding of the state of Israel in 1948.

The repossession of the property was coordinated by Israeli police and overseen by the Israel Land Fund, which will work to develop the property into apartments for Jewish residents.

Squatter Khaled Natche refused to leave the property voluntarily, despite a promise by the Israel Land Fund to waive NIS 250,000 in damages the court ordered paid to the organization if they would evacuate on their own.  Natche’s brother, who lived next door to him in the second of the two illegally occupied buildings, heeded the court order and left the premises a few weeks ago.

Despite his refusal, Khaled Natche and his family were removed from the dwelling on Wednesday, with their belongings removed into a moving truck for transportation.  No violence took place.

The Beit Hanina properties sit on 1.5 acres of land just a quarter of a mile from the Jerusalem light rail.

Now that the property has returned to its owners, the Israel Land Fund will be charged with developing a 50-apartment complex called Nof Shmuel, named for its view on the tomb of the Prophet Samuel.  The project has already been approved by the Jerusalem municipality and the Interior Ministry, and is awaiting construction permits, according to Israel Land Fund president Aryeh King.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/eu-condemns-israel-for-returning-property-to-owners-evicting-squatters/2012/04/22/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: