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July 22, 2014 / 24 Tammuz, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Beit Hanina’

Violent Arabs Again Target Jerusalem Light Rail

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Jerusalem Arabs are continuing to target the Jerusalem Light Rail in violence intended to ensure the transit system will “never pass through Shuafat,” a northern Arab suburb of the capital.

Shuafat is also home to the family of 16 year old Muhammad Abu Khdeir, who was murdered last week. Six Jewish suspects have been taken into custody in connection with the case, and three have reportedly confessed to the crime.

Three Light Rail stops were utterly destroyed last week by Arab rioters, despite the fact that the rail is used by Arab commuters on a daily basis, as well as Jews, to reach their jobs in the city.

Nevertheless, extremist Arabs have said they are determined to destroy the Light Rail’s infrastructure to ensure the rail system cannot pass through Shuafat “ever.” Officials, meanwhile, have said it will take months to repair the damage to the stops once the violence has ceased.

The route of the Jerusalem Light Rail currently ends at Ammunition Hill (Givat HaTachmoshit), as it is no longer possible to use the infrastructure at Shuafat and Beit Hanina. This also cuts off access for the numerous Jewish residents who live in the northern Jerusalem neighborhood of Neve Yaakov.

Abbas Demands Netanyahu Condemn Arab Boy’s Murder (After Bibi Already Condemned It)

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas took the first opportunity possible Wednesday to call on Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu to “condemn the kidnapping and murder [of an Arab youth]… as we condemned those of the three Israelis.”

Except that Mahmoud Abbas took several days to get around to his condemnation, whereas Prime Minister Netanyahu had already condemned the murder of young Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir, 17, by the time Abbas was demanding that he do so.

The entire Israeli leadership, in fact, rushed to unequivocally condemn the murder, from one end of the political spectrum to the other. That, despite the fact there were quiet indications by sources that requested anonymity the killing might be connected to a blood feud, a clan war or an “honor killing.”

Nor is Abbas doing anything on his own to discourage the violence of Jerusalem Arabs, who are rioting in every neighborhood in which they live.

The young Arab teen is believed to have been kidnapped from the northern Jerusalem neighborhood of Beit Hanina overnight Tuesday. His parents called police to report him missing at about 4:00 a.m. and his body was allegedly found in the Jerusalem forest about an hour later, at 5:00 a.m., burnt and showing other signs of violence.

The efforts by Abbas to compare the murder to the kidnapping and subsequent murder by Hamas terrorists of three Israeli teens from Gush Etzion on June 12 was obvious, as was his attempt to place the blame for the killing at the doorstep of Israeli Jews, as a “revenge attack.”

Equally clear was his determination to seek a way to halt the IDF’s continued Operation Brother’s Keeper as soldiers proceed with the intensified search for the murderers of the boys, whose bodies were laid to rest Tuesday in the Modi’in cemetery.

Abbas blamed Israel for the death of the young Arab teen, the Bethlehem-based Ma’an news agency reported. He said in his statement to the WAFA news service that Israel should “take real measures” to “stop all revenge attacks.”

But Netanyahu had already referred to the killing as a “despicable murder” in public statements at the start of the day. The prime minister also spoke with Public Security Minister Yitzchak Aharonovich, urging him to get police moving to track down Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir’s killers.

The family of Naftali Frenkel, one of the murdered Israeli teens, meanwhile, told reporters Wednesday morning there was no difference between Arab and Jewish blood.

“If the Arab youth was murdered for nationalistic reasons then this is a horrible and horrendous thing. There is no difference between [Arab] blood and [Jewish] blood,” said Yishai Frenkel, uncle of the young terrror victim. “Murder is murder. There is no forgiveness and no justification for any form of murder,” he said.

However, there are many issues that are not yet clear.

It is still not known, for instance, whether in fact the two incidents are related, according to police officials. The prime minister called on security agencies to work swiftly to track down the perpetrators and identify their motives — but Abbas has obviously ignored his words.

Netanyahu also called on all sides not to take the law into their own hands, warning that Israel is “a nation of laws and everyone must act according to the law.”

Moreover, reports have surfaced of an Arab teen who was allegedly forced into a car in Shuafat late Tuesday night. It is not yet clear who was behind the kidnapping, nor whether the teen mentioned in the report is Muhammad, or someone else.

Nor has the body that was found in the Jerusalem forest definitely been identified as that of Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir. It may belong to someone else. All these issues have yet to be clarified.

Arabs Riot in Northern, Eastern Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

An undercover police officer narrowly escaped death Wednesday as an Arab mob tried to lynch him in the Shuafat refugee camp in northern Jerusalem.


The officer was discovered in the heat of Arab riots following the murder of an Arab teenager, Muhammad Abu Khdeir,  overnight between Tuesday and Wednesday. Abu Khdeir’s charred body was found in the Jerusalem forest at about 5:00 a.m., about an hour after police received a call from his parents reporting him missing. The boy, a 17 year old resident of Shuafat, was allegedly kidnapped from nearby Beit Hanina.

The discovery sparked riots by Arabs in northern Jerusalem Arab neighborhoods such as Shuafat and Beit Hanina, who claimed the murderers were Jews avenging the murders of Eyal Yifrah, Gil-Ad Sha’ar and Naftali Fraenkel.

Israeli leaders, including Minister Uri Ariel (Jewish Home) and Yesha Council spokesman Dani Dayan, condemned the murder immediately.  “I vigorously condemn barbaric murder of boy in #Jerusalem. I am confident security forces will bring perpetrators to justice,” Tweeted Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat.

Large Scale Riots

Throughout Wednesday morning, residents clashed with police and security forces in Arab-majority neighborhoods around the city.  Light Rail service in the area was suspended as rioters hurled rocks and rolled burning tires at police. At least one person injured in the melee and taken to the hospital.

In the Old City Arab worshipers stoned security forces on the Temple Mount and threw rocks over the wall at the Western Wall plaza below. In response to the violence police closed the Mount to Jewish visitors, while leaving it open to the Muslims responsible for the violence.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld confirmed that no arrests have been made as a result of the clashes, but added that police would likely detain participants in the riots “soon. “It is likely there will be (arrests), following review of CCTV footage of the incident,” Rosenfeld told The Jewish Press. 

Rosenfeld added that the Temple Mount area has since quieted down, although riots are continuing in the Beit Hanina neighborhood.

Police are continuing their investigation of the circumstances that led to the murder of the young Arab teen, who sources requesting anonymity said may have been killed in a blood feud between two rival clans.

Terrorist Attacks on Light Rail in Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Arab terrorists hurled pipe bombs at the Jerusalem Light Rail Wednesday morning. One of the bombs exploded, but failed to injure any of the passengers. A second bomb did not detonate and was deactivated by sappers summoned to the scene by Israel Police officers.

Arabs continued throughout the morning to riot in the northern Jerusalem Arab neighborhoods of Shuafat, with violence spilling over into nearby Beit Hanina as well in response the death of a young Arab teen who was kidnapped from an Arab neighborhood in northern Jerusalem. His body, found in the Jerusalem forest at about 5:00 a.m., was burnt and showed other signs of violence, according to sources quoted by the Hebrew-language Ynet website.

Arabs in Shuafat burned tires, hurled explosives and rocks at IDF soldiers and Israel Police. They vandalized three Light Rail stations, smashing the glass and destroying the security cameras.

Authorities subsequently announced on Wednesday morning that the Jerusalem Light Rail would operate only between the Mount Herzl and the Givat Tachmoshet stops. The Beit Hanina and Shuafat stops are to be skipped until further notice.

Section of 1,800-Year-Old Road Discovered in Jerusalem

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Archaeological excavation prior to the installation of a drainage pipe has exposed for “the first time…such a finely preserved section of the road in Jerusalem,” the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Tuesday.

The ancient road leading from Yafo [Jaffa] to Jerusalem dates to the Roman period of the 2nd-4th centuries was exposed in the Beit Hanina neighborhood in northern Jerusalem.

The wide road of approximately 26 feet was bounded on both sides by curbstones and was built of large flat stones fitted to each other in order to create a comfortable surface for walking. Some of the pavers were very badly worn, indicating the extensive use that was made of the road, and over the years the road also underwent a series of repairs.

“Several segments of the road were previously excavated by research expeditions of the IAA, but such a finely preserved section of the road has not been discovered in the city of Jerusalem until now ,” according to David Yeger, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

“The Romans attached great importance to the roads in the empire,” he added. “They invested large sums of money and utilized the most advanced technological aids of the period in order to crisscross the empire with roads. These served the government, military, economy and public by providing an efficient and safe means of passage.

“Way stations and roadside inns were built along the roads, as well fortresses in order to protect the travelers. The construction and maintenance of the roads was assigned to military units, but civilians also participated in the work as part of the compulsory labor imposed on them by the authorities.”

The road section that was discovered is part of the imperial network of roads that led to Jerusalem from the coastal plain and which are known from both historical sources and archaeological excavations.

Two main arteries led from Yafo to Jerusalem during the Roman period. One is the road that passes through Bet Horon and the other runs via Sha’ar HaGai, west of Jerusalem. This particular segment belongs to the Bet Horon road. The road began in Yafo and passed through Lod where it split it two different directions: one to Sha’ar HaGai and the other by way of Modi’in along the route of what is today Highway 443 to Bet Horon.

From there the road continued until it merged with the highlands road that led to the Old City of Jerusalem.

Retaliatory Attack in Beit Hanina

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Following an Arab stone throwing attack on at least one Jewish driver near the Beit Hanina neighborhood next to Pisgat Ze’ev in Jerusalem on Thursday, Arab residents of Beit Hanina discovered on Monday that the tires on 21 of their cars had been slashed.

In addition, someone sprayed on a nearby wall, “There won’t be silence on stone throwing”. A Jewish star was painted on at least one van.

Following the terror wave of Arab stone and firebomb throwing that has struck Judea and Samaria, Arab attacks on Jews are also on the rise in certain areas of Jerusalem.

Jerusalem Mayor Kicks Off Arab Street Namings

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat will inaugurate a street in the Arab neighborhood of Beit Hanina on Wednesday in the name of a famous Egyptian singer.

The ceremony at 3:30pm will name the street Umm Kultum, after a beloved Egyptian singer, the daughter of an Imam, who died in 1975.

The naming is part of a project to name all streets in Arab neighborhoods in Jerusalem.  According to a press release by the Government Press Office, many streets in those neighborhoods have never been officially named.  Now, 145 new street names have been approved and will be affixed to roads in Zur Baher, Beit Hanina, Shuafat, Issawiya, Abu-Tor, Silwan, and Ras Al-Amud.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/jerusalem-mayor-kicks-off-arab-street-namings/2012/10/17/

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