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Posts Tagged ‘Rabbi Miller’

Mishpatim: Holy Lifestyle

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

The lifestyle of a holy people is different from the lifestyle of others, just as the lifestyle of kings and princes is different from that of common folk. Hashem has left marks of distinction on Israel, His chosen nation, in numerous ways. As Rabbi Avigdor Miller, zt”l, explains, one of the foremost marks of holiness is a special diet. What’s more, Rabbi Miller explains that this special diet is not only a sign of our distinct character, but is even a cause of it.

“And men of holiness you shall be to me, and you shall not eat meat in the field of a torn carcass (22:30). The expression “to Me” means “men of holiness that are Mine.” By being holy, they become close to Hashem.

The prohibition of trefah is a cause and an effect. It is an effect of its elevated status that Israel is limited in its diet. Just as men cannot eat grass and raw meat, as do animals, and are thereby elevated by their especial diet that confers dignity upon them, so is Israel given a select diet that denotes its elevation.

But this prohibition is also a cause of Israel’s excellence. The necessity to restrain the appetite for undignified foods 1) confers aristocracy and special distinction 2) and also causes the excellence of constant self-control to refrain from forbidden foods.

By this restriction, Israel becomes ‘holy to Me.” Similarly: “You shall eat no dead carcass (n’velah)…for you are a people holy to Hashem your G-d” (Devarim 4:21) and “For you shall be holy” (Vayikra 11:45) in connection with the laws of forbidden animals (ibid. 1:44).

Although the quality of kedushah is conspicuous in the laws of forbidden food, the holiness of Israel is expressed by all other prohibitions and also by all the mitzvos: “You shall be holy” (ibid. 19:2) is said as the preface to a number of both positive and negative mitzvos.

This is because of the double excellence the mitzvos represent: the mere fact of being commanded by Hashem is a demonstration of Israel’s holiness and the fulfillment of the mitzvos confers upon Israel an additional degree of holiness.

This holiness has two aspects: 1) the closeness to Hashem that commanded this precept and 2) the setting of Israel apart from the nations, as the Israelite home is thereby rendered entirely unlike a non-Jewish home because of the kosher diet and kosher utensils, and because Jews are thus unable to eat together with non-Jews.

In the prohibition of forbidden foods we find this purpose: “And you shall separate between the clean beasts and the unclean…and you shall not abominate yourselves by beasts and fowl…which I have separated for you to make unclean. And you shall be holy unto Me…and I have separated you from the nations to be mine” (Vayikra 20:25-26).

Although the purpose of all the mitzvos is to set Israel apart from the nations and also to discourage any fraternizing, the dietary laws are a special demonstration that the body of the Israelite is a sanctuary into which only the purest food is admitted. (This holiness of the Israelite body makes it worthy of eating the offerings – see 12:8. The Canaanite slave shares this privilege of the holiness of the body.)

This is an important general purpose of all the positive and negative commandments: 1) to keep Israel apart from the nations 2) and to demonstrate that Israel has been chosen by Hashem as His holy people.

 

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com.  For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Yisro: Of Magistrates And Kings

Friday, February 10th, 2012

The greatness of our Torah leaders is often vivid but occasionally requires illumination. Consider the exchange between Yisro and Moshe. At first glance we might mistake this episode for a simple conversation or advice from a helpful father-in-law. Rabbi Avigdor Miller, zt”l, cautions not to diminish the depth of this dialogue. When understood properly, it is, in fact, revealing of the wisdom of both of these great patriarchs.

“And now hearken to my voice, I shall counsel you” (18:19).

We should not be so naive to think Moshe himself could not have thought of the plan of appointing officers. The Elders of the sons of Israel in Egypt were an official and recognized body, not mere old men as are found today in homes for the aged. It is certain that Joseph, in whose time the people had already increased, in his great practical wisdom ordained magistrates for his people. But Yisro’s counsel was given now for two purposes.

1. Moshe’s plan had been to elevate the people by temporarily superseding the system of magistrates, so that all the people should come to him personally. This was now especially necessary because the old order had been based on human logic, but now it had become imperative to yield the human logic to the divine dictates of the Torah. This necessitated a fundamental change in all procedures in every aspect of one’s daily life, and Moshe foresaw that difficulties were sure to arise.

The former judges had now been deprived of all competence. New judges would need to be trained, but even they might continue to apply the new Torah laws with the old logical system. The urgency of understanding that everything from now on depended solely on Torah moved Moshe to take the extreme step of being the sole judge and interpreter of Torah. Any other course could lead to disaster. Even Aharon, when Moshe was away on Sinai, decided to compromise for the sake of the people’s welfare. (Although logic is a part of Torah, it must be applied with strict Torah procedures.)

We do not know for how long Moshe intended to be the sole judge, but he certainly planned eventually to institute a system of general judges and local magistrates, as Hashem indeed commanded, but only after he himself had personally initiated them into the Torah way of thinking.

To this Yisro countered: Very true. But can you rely on a miracle (one not explicitly promised by Hashem) that you and the people could persevere in such an uncomfortable and tedious procedure, standing in line for days in order to gain an audience with you? You will surely wear away, but even if you do not tire physically, your authority will be worn away by personal contact with everyone; and the people will lose favor in your eyes when you deal with their individual idiosyncrasies and obstinacy and foolishness. Familiarity breeds contempt, and therefore not every individual should have access to you and take up your time with petty questions and problems.

2) Moshe aimed to create a noble nation (“a kingdom of priests” – 19:6) that would govern itself without much coercion by the authorities. Thus: “These were the kings that reigned in the land of Edom before any king reigned in Israel” (Bereishis 36:31), because Israel did not need a king. “In those days there was no king in Israel, [because] each man did as was right in his eyes” (Shoftim 17:6).

The mitzvah of making a king was conditional: “If you say, Let me put over me a king” (Devarim 17:14) – from which it is clear this mitzvah depended on the time when you choose. “If you say…” is exceptional among all the mitzvos because to govern themselves by their own conscience (“Each man as is right in his eyes”) was preferable. Moshe therefore did not plan to subject the people to the scrutiny of a multitude of magistrates until some time had elapsed.

But Yisro countered: Are the people great enough to be so independent? Now especially, when beginning the new mode of Torah life, they require special surveillance: officers of tens, of fifties, of hundreds and of thousands. Until now they had been permitted to eat everything, they were not obligated by Shabbat or Yom Tov or by the numerous other laws of the Torah. Therefore the people must have tens of thousands of magistrates that supervise all the behavior of each person, in order to train them to become accustomed to the new existence as a Torah nation.

Moshe did not need Yisro to instruct him. Yisro was given the honor of voicing that which Moshe himself understood even better, and which Hashem also eventually commanded (Sifri, Devarim 1:9).

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com.  For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Beshalach: Hashem’s Mighty Works

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

“And Hashem turned back the sea by a strong east-wind all the night” (14:21). The wind was entirely unnecessary, for it was naturally unable to split the sea open and create a pathway, as the verse concludes “And it made the sea into dry land and the waters were split apart.” This was entirely a miracle, which resulted when “Moshe stretched out his arm over the sea” (14:16) as Hashem had commanded him.

But two factors were involved in this arrangement:

1: The Egyptians were misled into believing the splitting of the sea could be attributed to the strong east wind, and therefore they did not hesitate to enter between the two halves of the sea in pursuit of Israel. Had they seen the sea open without some form of natural explanation, the Egyptians would not have ventured into the sea – because if it could be split miraculously, it could also come together miraculously to drown them.

2: Hashem utilizes His laws of nature as much as possible, for they were created by Him. Even though the wind would actually be ineffective, the impression would be gained that the wind participated in splitting the sea. Even this, though not actually effective, was the miraculous result of the forgoing action: “And Moshe stretched out his arm…”

There were other great disturbances of nature at this time or not long afterward. “When Israel came forth from Egypt, the house of Jacob from a people of strange language.… The sea saw and fled, the Jordan turned backward. The mountains leaped like rams, the hills like young sheep” (Tehillim 114:1-4).

All of Nature was in turmoil, for a reason. “What ails you, O Sea, that you flee? O Jordan, that you turn backward? You mountains, that you leap like rams; you hills, like young sheep?” (Tehillim 114:5-6). But there was a great reason for these phenomena: “Tremble, O earth, at the presence of Hashem; at the presence of the G-d of Jacob” (ibid. 114:7).

It was because the presence of Hashem went forth together with His beloved people, to make known that His presence rests upon the children of the Fathers, that all of Nature erupted into violent action to demonstrate the approach of the Creator. These verses in Tehillim declare that mountains sank, and other mountains were created by violent disturbances of the earth’s crust. Sea floors became lofty hills, and mountaintops were submerged.

The ancient Egyptian Ipuwer Papyrus records: “The towns are destroyed. Upper Egypt is a wasteland. All is ruin.” The Torah is sparing of words, but the upheavals and the devastation were actually far worse than described. “And the waters were for them a wall on their right and on their left” (14:22).

“A wall” means the waters protected them from the arrows of the enemy. The sons of Israel had feared the waters no less than they had feared the enemy, but now they saw that Hashem had caused the waters to become their protector.

This is an important part of Hashem’s plan, whereby He demonstrates that He alone controls men’s fate by causing the salvation to come from what seemed to be the peril. The daughter of the oppressor Pharaoh was the one who rescued Moshe who defeated the oppressor. The feared vice-regent of Egypt who cast terror upon the sons of Jacob turned out to be none other than Joseph who was the savior of his family afterward.

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com. For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Bo: That You Should Know

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

“For I have made heavy his heart and the heart of his servants in order that I should put these signs of mine in his midst and in order that you should relate in the ears of your son and your son’s son how I dealt with Egypt, and you should know that I am Hashem” (10:1-2).

That great generation was mandated with the mission of serving as eyewitnesses who would testify to all future generations. This is a key statement that explains the reason for all the wonders that took place in Egypt and at Sinai and in the wilderness: this generation was privileged to be eyewitnesses in order to testify for all future generations.

Why were they considered such good witnesses? Because they were “a stiff-necked people,” which means highly intelligent people of independent minds who had learned from Avraham and from Yitzchak and from Yaakov to discount the superstitions of the nations among whom they had sojourned. This was the reason Moshe had said to Hashem: “They will not believe me” (4:1).

Hashem performed miracles for these trusty eyewitnesses that were never again shown to any generation in order that all subsequent generations would benefit by the lessons these miracles teach. Thenceforth the laws of nature decreed by the Creator would no longer be disturbed, for the lessons of the miracles are available to all who wish to study them as they are related in the Scriptures.

From these words (“In order that you should relate in the ears of your son and your son’s son…”) it is apparent that such wonders would not be performed in the future. The time of open miracles would pass, because the Creator desires that His laws of nature should prevail. But these laws of nature are actually stupendous miracles that men fail to recognize due to the regularity of their occurrence, which lulls the mind into lethargy.

Now, in that era the great open and unusual miracles were performed so that men would remember them forever learn from them that Hashem performs miracles of equal magnitude every day: “A man’s food is as difficult [i.e. as miraculous] as the splitting of the Sea of Suf” (Pesachim 118a).

The plagues were chiefly intended not as punishment upon Egypt but to bestow on the sons of Israel the everlasting gift of awareness of Hashem and of His election of the nation of Israel forever: “I am Hashem” and “Israel is My firstborn son” (4:22).

When the later generations fail to utilize properly the lessons of these wondrous events, it is considered a frustration of Hashem’s plan, and as if Hashem punished Egypt in vain and abrogated His laws of nature in vain.

“That which l performed in Egypt and My signs which I put upon them” were for the purpose that “You should know that I am Hashem,” which refers to Israel.

This verse foretells that such wonders will not recur because Hashem does not wish to abrogate His laws of nature. Forever we shall look back to the great past.

The second verse should have stated “And you shall know that I, Hashem, have performed this wonder.” But to know that He is Hashem means that and much more, for the word Hashem signifies the “source of all that exists” and therefore He alone is the doer of wonders and of all that transpires.

“You shall know” – did the first seven plagues not cause them to know? But here we learn that to “know Hashem” is an unending effort that should be continued always, because His greatness is endless. Thus Moshe requested, after Hashem had revealed Himself so abundantly to him, “let me know You.”

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com.

For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Va’eira: The Names Of Israel

Friday, January 20th, 2012

“And Amram took Yocheved…. And she bore to him Aharon and Moshe” (6:20).

The names that were given in Egypt were not repetitions of previous names but were original expressions of genuine devotion to Hashem. These names were usually chosen by the mothers, demonstrating their intense loyalty to the G-d of their fathers. Amram denotes “People of the Most High,” and Yocheved means “Hashem is my glory.” It is thus understandable that from such a union there would result very great offspring.

The character of the women certainly reflects the nobility of the men; but, as we shall yet see, the Israelite women were possessed of an exceptional spirit. “By the merit of the righteous women of that time, our fathers were redeemed from Egypt” (Sotah 11B).

Even the names we are not able to explain were certainly abbreviated forms of exalted expressions. It is thus evident that this generation (and their following generations) lived and breathed in an atmosphere of intense devotion to Hashem, coupled with an awareness of the distinctive excellence of their people.

Today, after 2,000 years of exile, we look back and are able to understand one of the chief purposes of the sojourn in Egypt: to provide a test whether Israel could survive in an alien environment, and to provide a model for the major part of Israel’s history. We perceive now that our nation was created for a destiny of exile. Even the period of Israel in its land was a preparation for the much longer period of exile.

Because our fathers succeeded in the bitter test of exile in Egypt, even before they possessed a Torah and the other sacred scriptures, and they refused to yield to the customs of the powerful and wealthy people among whom they dwelt as despised aliens, they were therefore deemed worthy by Hashem to be chosen for their career as a persecuted minority.

The experience of 210 years in Egypt, during which period they did not alter their names or their language or their traditional attitudes and practices, provided a historic pattern for the many centuries of exile among the nations. Because of the merit of their resistance to the environment, Israel was spared from the sword of the Destroyer who has wiped out one nation after the other in the course of history.

The clue to Israel’s permanence was to be found in their names (Shemos Rabbah 1:33): “Because of four reasons Israel was redeemed from Egypt: 1) they did not change their names 2) and their language 3) and they did not engage in slander 4) and none of them were guilty of immorality.”

But we read the words of Yecheskel the prophet (20:6-10): “I said to them: Let each mean cast away the abominations…and not defile yourselves by the idols of Egypt…. And they rebelled against Me and were not willing to hearken to Me…. They did not cast away the abominations of their eyes, and they did not forsake the idols of Egypt.”

We might accept Yecheskel’s words literally, but even in the matter of idolatry we perceive Yecheskel spoke only of a very small minority. This is clearly evident from the prophet’s denunciation of the generation of the Wilderness: “And the house of Israel rebelled against Me in the Wilderness, in My statutes they did not walk…and My Sabbaths they profaned very much” (Yecheskel 20:13). But we know of only two such instances. 1) “And it was on the seventh day some of the people went out to gather (the mann) and they did not find” (Shemos 16:27). 2) “And the sons of Israel were in the Wilderness and they found a man gathering wood on the Sabbath day” (Bamidbar 15:32).

The first instance involved only some of the people, and they actually performed no act of desecration of the Sabbath. If they would have found mann, it would have discredited Moshe’s admonition. The second instance involved but one individual who was thereupon put to death. In a nation of millions, and in the space of forty years, these were the sole instances of Sabbath desecration; this therefore should serve as a monument of supreme glory for that nation.

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com. For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Vayigash: Kindness Amid Suffering

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

Hashem’s kindness is limitless, and even when He administers judgment, it is tempered with kindness. The reasons Jacob and his family were to descend to Egypt were many, as Rabbi Avigdor Miller, zt”l, explains. And in all, we are able to discern Hashem’s love and kindness to the nation of Israel, despite its suffering at the hands of the Egyptians.

“I shall go down with you to Egypt” (46:4). The center of the universe is wherever Israel is found. Even when the family of Jacob forsakes the chosen land and is exiled to Egypt, Hashem, Who is the cause of the universe, states not merely that He will protect them but also that He shall go down with them to Egypt. Thus the history of Israel is the true history of the world; all else is background and scenery.

However, despite this promise of “I shall go down with you,” Israel must fear to go anywhere unless full circumspection is employed. Jacob did not go until Hashem commanded him not to fear; and Hashem did not command him until Joseph had become the ruler of Egypt.

Why did Hashem choose Egypt instead of Canaan as the birthplace of the nation of Israel? Among the reasons we discern the following:

1) Israel needed the bondage of Egypt to provide the benefits that resulted from that experience. Canaan was not able to enslave Israel because it was a land of small city-kingdoms and did not possess the power of a mighty nation ruled by one king. Among the benefits of bondage were: the great lessons of the Ten Plagues which were visited on the oppressors, the sympathy for the slave (Devarim 5:15) and for the ger (ibid. 10:19), and the great gratitude for the deliverance from Egypt which was the preface for the acceptance of the Torah.

2) Israel needed the protection of Egypt while the family of Jacob increased so rapidly. Had they been in Canaan, Eisav’s seed would not have looked on complacently as Jacob’s offspring multiplied and filled the land. Other predator-nations, and even the Canaani, would have taken action.

3) The gratitude for the gift of the land of milk and honey would have been lacking had the nation come into being in that land. The great happiness of the blessed land, coming after the exile in Egypt and the 40 years in the wilderness, created a gratitude to Hashem, which was difficult to forget.

4) Because Egypt was a united nation under one king, Joseph’s power enabled him to maintain his influence over his family for 71 years. This extremely important factor, which helped shape the character of the nation, would have entirely been absent had they grown into a nation in the land of Canaan.

5) Egypt abominated sheepherders (43:32, 46:34). Therefore they were less likely to mingle with the sons of Israel. Even when Egypt enslaved the Israelites, we find no mention of Israelite women violated by Egyptians; for the national abhorrence of sheepherders was a wall between the two nations.

6) Because the family of Jacob settled in the very fertile province of Goshen, they were there able to be fruitful and to multiply much more than would have been the case in Canaan. They remained in Goshen for the entire 210 years. Although Eisav was reconciled with Jacob, his family was hostile to the house of Israel and they bore a bitter grudge that might have erupted explosively if not for the fact that Israel was secure in Egypt.

Even after 210 years, when Israel came forth from Egypt amid G-d’s open miracles, “Amalek [the people of Amalek, Eisav’s grandson] came and fought with Israel at Refidim” (Shemos 17:8). The hatred of Eisav’s seed against Jacob was so intense that it continued to burn violently long afterward, even in the days of Mordechai and Esther, when Haman ben Hamdatha the Agagi (descended from Agag the king of the Amaleki – I Samuel 15:8) attempted to destroy all the Jews. All of Eisav’s seed were bitter enemies, and therefore the security of Egypt was a gift from G-d to allow the house of Israel to increase and become a great nation.

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com. For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

Mikeitz: The Greatness Of Joseph

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

“And Joseph went out over the land of Egypt” (41:45). This was one of the greatest tests he underwent in his career. Wearing the king’s ring (41:42), clothed in royal linen with a golden chain around his neck (ibid.), riding in the second royal chariot with runners before him (41:43), having full power over the land (41:44), having an Egyptian name and an Egyptian wife the daughter of a priest, he had every reason to disown his family which had so wronged him, and he could have without any effort become a full Egyptian in heart and soul.

Hashem here is planning a twofold achievement: Joseph was made the all-powerful ruler over Egypt for the benefit of the future nation of Israel that would develop under his exceptional guidance, and therefore Hashem granted Joseph very great authority. But parallel to this purpose was another very important purpose: to develop the greatness of Joseph himself.

Great individuals are also extremely important to Hashem, just as are multitudes of righteous people. Therefore Joseph was tested by opportunities to become arrogant; but he became even more perfect than ever, because he continued to fear Hashem always and to bear humility in his heart. Additional tests of perfection were afforded to him by means of his great power, because he utilized his authority to deal kindly with the people of the land, and all that he did was for justice and mercy to all men.

Elsewhere in the Chumash we also find examples of the principle that the lives of individual righteous men are especially important in the eyes of Hashem; and in order to produce such individuals and to encourage them, Hashem takes extraordinary action similar to that which is done for an entire nation or for all nations.

“And he said, G-d should favor you, my son” (43:29). Why should a blessing be said in the presence of the recipient? Would the blessing not be just as effective if it were said when he was not present? It seems the blessing is more sincere when said without the knowledge of the recipient. Yet we see that Yitzchak blessed his sons to their face (27:27, 27:39), Jacob blessed Menasheh and Efraim to their face (“Take them to me and I shall bless them” – 48:9), and he blessed his sons in their presence (“Gather together…” – 49:1-2).

One purpose of the face-to-face blessing is to encourage the recipient with the love of the one bestowing the blessing and with the knowledge that he was blessed by him. Another purpose is that the personal encounter enhances the love of the bestower for the recipient; and a more heartfelt blessing results, which G-d hears more readily. Further: “He who bestows a gift to someone should let him know – [Shabbos 10b] – to cause him to love the giver” (Rashi, ibid.). By hearing the blessing personally, the recipient comes to love the bestower.

And Yehudah said: what shall we say, and what shall we justify ourselves; G-d has found the sin of your servants (44:16).

Judah is speaking to the Master of the World with these words to Joseph. Hitherto the brothers had spoken much to themselves and to each other to justify their behavior to their younger brother. This process of self-justification had continued for 22 years, during which time the brothers had covered their original feelings and thoughts with heavy layers of sound logic and righteous motivation, so that any wrong that may have been committed should be buried too deeply for Hashem to see.

It is the nature of men to attempt to conceal their true motives from G-d: “And the man and his wife concealed themselves from before Hashem.” Now Judah is saying the Viddui confession: “G-d has found the sin” which had been so long and so deeply concealed. This means: Now G-d has caused us to find.

This was said by Judah. Judah now comes to the fore as the spokesman and the leader, as he had previously begun.

Compiled for The Jewish Press by the Rabbi Avigdor Miller Simchas Hachaim Foundation, a project of Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel, which Rabbi Miller, zt”l, founded and authorized to disseminate his work. Subscribe to the Foundation’s free e-mail
newsletters on marriage, personal growth, and more at www.SimchasHachaim.com.
For more information, or to sponsor a Simchas Hachaim Foundation program, call 718-258-7400 or e-mail info@SimchasHachaim.com.

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