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November 27, 2015 / 15 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Shema Yisrael’

Bar Mitzvah Boy Expelled From Temple Mount

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

A Bar Mitzvah boy was removed from the Temple Mount this morning by Israeli police, according to the Tazpit News Agency.

The boy, the son of the well-known Jewish activist, Noam Federman, went up to the Temple Mount on the occasion of his Bar Mitzvah.

While on the Temple Mount the boy said one of the oldest Jewish prayers out loud, Shema Yisrael, “Hear O’ Israel”.

The Israeli police do not allow Jews to pray on the Temple Mount, so the boy was removed.

‘Ptil Tekhelet’ Renews Monthly Tallit Raffle for Engaged Couples

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Are you engaged to be married, or perhaps there is an upcoming nuptial in your family? If so, the happy couple is eligible to enter a contest to win a prayer shawl tied with the ancient “ptil tekhelet” sky-blue woolen thread.

To enter, just send a wedding invitation to the Ptil Tehkhelet organization at info@tekhelet.com. The Israeli nonprofit group promotes, educates and produces what is believed to be the authentic “tekhelet” of the ancient Hebrews.

The “Ptil Tekhelet” is mentioned in Torah (Numbers 15:37-41), which also comprises the third paragraph of the Shema prayer:

“Speak to the children of Israel and tell them to make for themselves fringes (tassels) on the corners of their garments throughout their generations. They shall include a thread of sky-blue in the corner. These shall be your fringes, and you shall look upon them and remember all the commandments of the Lord and fulfill them. You will then not stray after your heart and your eyes by which you go astray. You will thus remember and keep all My Commandments, and be holy to your God. I am the Lord your God who brought you out of the land of Egypt to be your God; I , the Lord, am your God.”

The pilot raffle program created by the organization provides up to 10 tallitot (prayer shawls) per month to engaged couples around the world. Ten winners will be selected monthly to receive a free wedding tallit tied with a ptil tekhelet.

The contest has been extended for six months, beginning with the Hebrew month of Elul which started last Sunday, August 16.

“As these young people enter into marriage,” said Dr. Ari Greenspan, Chairman of Ptil Tekhelet, “it is fitting that they usher in their new life by donning something at once so ancient and so new as the tekhelet strings. It’s the perfect metaphor for marriage itself.”

The practice of including a thread of Biblical blue tekhelet among the white fringes of the tallit was lost over a millennium ago. Its restoration in modern times was promulgated by the vision of rabbis such as Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner, known as the Radzyner Rebbe, and Yitzchak Isaac Halevi Herzog, the first Chief Rabbi of Israel. Present-day technologies and Rabbinic responsa, have enabled the identification of the Murex Trunculus snail as the source of this ancient blue dye.

Dr. Naama Sukenik from the Israel Antiquities Authority last year spoke at the Tekhelet Conference on Murba’at Textile, where she discussed new finds from the Murba’at Caves in the Judean Desert.

According to Sukenik, a fabric dated to the second century, dyed with material obtained from the Murex trunculus sea-snail and colored blue, was shown to be of local Israelite origin and it appears that perhaps was colored with the ancient dye known as Tekhelet mentioned in the Bible.

The Ptil Tekhelet organization has now been producing this tekhelet for more than two decades. For more information, please visit the organization’s website.

Jerusalem Arabs Arrested for Brutally Beating Religious Jewish Couple

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

This is the news that the establishment media don’t want you to read because it interferes with their hate-fest against religious Jews and “settlers.”

Indictments have been filed against six Jerusalem Arabs whom police arrested for assaulting a Hareidi man and a religious couple in the Talpiot neighborhood.

The Hareidi Kikar Shabbat website published the report, but Israel’s left-leaning media, which like to wear their bleeding hearts on the public’s shoulders, were silent.

They continue to berate the entire religious community and the “settler movement” for last week’s arson-murder that everyone assumes was carried out by “hilltop youth” because the word “revenge” was scribbled in Hebrew on the wall of one of two houses in the heart of the Samarian village of Duma, that were attacked with Molotov cocktails and set on fire.

The same media were not interested in reporting that six Arabs, including three minors, used brass knuckles, a knife and a club to assault religious Jews. The language of the Hareidi website that reported the attack used a Hebrew expression that might have been “clean language” for sexual molestation of the young woman, but this has not been confirmed.

Three Jerusalem Arabs with the same last name and ages 19, 20 and 22, along with three minors aged 16 and 17, were indicted for two separate attacks.

They appeared at the Armon NaNatziv walkway in Talpiot and spotted a man, who appeared to be Hareidi, looking towards the Temple Mount.

They mocked him and then struck him with brass knuckles and a knife, leaving him bleeding.  The man was hospitalized and required stitches.

The next day, the attackers appeared at the same spot and started up a conversation with a young religious couple.

They told the man to stay where he was and that the girl should go with them, saying they would give her back to him after 10 minutes.

The Arab attackers stopped the women from trying to call the police and assaulted her and the young man. They knocked his kippa off his head and attacked them both with brass knuckles. The girl began reciting the “shema” prayer that Jews say when facing probable death.

The man was knocked on the ground and lost consciousness momentarily. He suffered a broken nose, and the woman suffered cuts and bruises on her head and shoulders.

The War on Tradition

Friday, July 31st, 2015


Rabbi Mike Feuer, educational director of Beit Midrash Sulam Yaakov, joins Yishai to discuss ‘Va’etchanan,’ this week’s Torah portion.

Yishai reflects on an extremely difficult experience he had yesterday — enduring verbal abuse and humiliation, as he attempted to visit the Temple Mount.

Then, in the light of the treatment of Jews at Judaism’s holiest site, the demolitions at Beit El and the Gay Pride March, Yishai discusses with Rabbi Feuer the repetition in “Va’etchanan” of the 10 Commandments and the iconic phrases that crop up throughout the portion, including the line that embodies the core principals of Judaism — the “Shema.” The two also consider the greatest struggles facing modern-day Israel and 21st-century Jewry.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Temple Mount Reopened to Jews and Arab Soccer Game Halted (+ Video)

Monday, October 21st, 2013

After the Temple Mount was closed to Jews for almost a week, the Israeli police permitted Jewish access to the holy site on Sunday.

The police closed the site after a group of Jews had the audacity to pray ‘Shema Yisrael’ out loud and then pulled out an Israeli flag.

Dozens of Jews went up to the Temple Mount on Sunday.

In what is an unusual response, after the Jewish visitors complained to the police about the Arabs playing soccer on the Temple Mount, which is both illegal and disrespectful, the police actually confiscated the ball, and stopped the game. At best, the Arabs simply ignore the police, and at worst, the the police simply let the soccer games continue unabated, despite the court order forbidding this disrespect on the Judaism’s holiest site.

Source: The Temple Mount Blog

Temple Mount Closed, 3 Jews Arrested for Saying Sh’ma Israel

Monday, October 14th, 2013

UPDATE: According to Ma’ariv, the Temple Mount compound has been closed to visitors, following the arrest of ten men who danced and waved Israeli flags at the site. The area is now clear for Arab kids to continue their soccer matches.

We previously reported that Jerusalem police on Monday morning detained for interrogation three Jewish visitors on the Temple Mount on suspicion of praying and bowing in the area which is designated for strictly Muslim worship.

According to Yehuda Glick, a Temple Mount Heritage Foundation official who has been detained last week and banned from setting foot on the holiest Jewish site, the three Jews, Mevo Horon Rabbi, Rav Micha Peled, and Rabbis Yaakov Heiman and Danny Simmon, were arrested after they had been caught saying the “Sh’ma Israel,” the twice-daily utterance of the covenant between God and the Jews.

Not a very popular document near the Al Aqsa…

The United States Dept. of State has deplored numerous times the unequal treatment of non-Muslims on Temple Mount. Jews, Christians and other non-Muslims who are spotted shutting their eyes meaningfully or moving their lips silently are immediately approached by police who usher them off the compound.

According to Glick, there appears to be anew campaign emerging on the part of the police, whereby they would be guaranteed a measure of peace by the Waqf, the Jordanian charity supervising the site, in exchange for banning anyone who manages to upset the Arab bosses of the place.

Several months ago, MK Moshe Feiglin, a frequent visitor to the holiest site for Jews, was banned indefinitely, backed with an order from Prime Minister Netanyahu.

Jerusalem Menorot

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

The Menorat HaKnesset

The bronze, four and a half meter high Menorat HaKnesset stands in the Menorah Plaza by the main entrance to Gan HaVradim. This impressive menorah, in the shape of that which appears in the Arch of Titus, was created by Jewish sculptor Benno Elkan of England. It was given in 1956 by the English parliament as a gift to the State of Israel.

Like a “visual textbook,” it has engravings of some thirty important events, idioms, characters and terms from Jewish history. Each of the seven branches portrays a number of specific scenes, carved in relief.

The menorah interweaves themes of galus and geulah, showing the tidal waves of the rise and fall of the Jewish People throughout history. The first depiction on the right hand branch illustrates Yirmiyahu bewailing the Churban, while the last left hand branch’s upper engraving shows the Final Redemption as pictured in Yeshayahu where a lion and a lamb will live in harmony (Yeshayahu 2:4, 11:6).

The 70 years of the Babylonian Exile (lowest representation on last left hand branch) is illustrated by showing the exiles lamenting the destruction of Yerushalayim and Bayis Rishon by the rivers of Bavel. This scene is counterbalanced by a depiction of the Shivas Tzion of Ezra seen on the following branch at the top, together with an image of Nechemiah,  (lowest bottom carving on outer right hand branch) who served King Artaxerxes of Persia in a high-ranking position. He fortified those who had come back to Tzion from Bavel with Zerubavel and Yehoshua Kohen Gadol. In the face of much opposition, he was instrumental in organizing the rebuilding of the walls of Yerushalayim and helping many of Klal Yisrael resettle. In addition, during his time, Torah observance was greatly strenghtened.

The engraving on the outer left hand branch shows Rabban Yochanan ben Zakai asking the Roman authorities to establish a center in Yavneh for the study of Torah. He realized that Yerushalayim and the Beit HaMikdash were facing destruction and knew that in order to preserve the Eternal People, their eternal law needed to be preserved first. His request for Yavneh was a way of ensuring our continued survival as a nation.

The central point of the menorah, to which the eye is instinctively drawn, is a circle exactly in its middle which says “Shema Yisrael.” The central branch‘s first engraving shows Chur and Yehoshua holding up Moshe hands in the war against Amalek. When Bnei Yisrael looked up at Moshe’s upheld hands, they turned their heart towards HaKodesh Baruch Hu, and were able to overcome the enemy. It’s a reminder that wars are not won by military superiority but rather by the might of Hakadosh Baruch Hu as He fights for His children. The words from Zecharyah (4), which are carved on the bases of the two outer arms strengthen this concept “Not because of the (number of) soldiers or the (military) strength, but with My Ruach, said HaShem Zvakot.”

The scene symbolizing David’s triumph over Goliath echoes the above ideas (3rd branch from the left top) – as does the Chashmonaim victory of the few over the many, portrayed in the 2nd scene of the outer right hand branch. When we consider the numerous wars fought in Eretz Yisrael from 1948 and on, it is clear that it was only with Hashem’s kindness that we were able to prevail over our enemies. And it will only be with the help of the Almighty that we will survive our current problems.

There are many other scenes depicted, such as Shlomo’s understanding of the language of the birds and Avraham Avinu’s purchaing the Cave of the Machpelah, as well Rachel Imeinu bitterly weeping over her children in exile.

To reach the Menorat HaKnesset, travel on the Yitzchak Rabin Highway, turn in at the Supreme Court onto Rechov Rothschild, and keep on going until you see the Knesset Menorah to your right.

The Golden Menorah

As you walk up the steps that lead up to the Jewish Quarter of the Old City, to your right is a golden reconstruction of the menorah of the Beit HaMikdash created by the Temple Institute. Surrounding the menorah are stone benches allowing visitors to sit and enjoy a panoramic view of the Temple Mount with the golden glass-caged menorah in the foreground. The part of the Western Wall exposed by the southern excavation at the Davidson Centre is also clearly visible. But the Mugrabie Bridge and a large tree hide the section we call the Kotel.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/travel/jerusalem-menorot/2012/12/02/

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