The truth is that the congressman is something of a political novice, whose upset victory in last year’s election had more to do with his opponent’s implosion in the wake of a corruption scandal than with either the Democratic tide that swept the nation or Sestak’s own impressive résumé. We must hope his refusal to be seen as backing down to pressure – even in the face of what even he now must realize is a blunder – will eventually be overcome by common sense, or a stern lecture from more senior and wiser Democratic leaders.

But one obstacle to that sensible outcome would be the reluctance of some of his local supporters to hold him accountable. If, because they support him on withdrawal from Iraq or on domestic issues, Jewish and non-Jewish friends of Israel decide to give him a pass for this egregious mistake, it will be sending the wrong message not only to Congress, but to CAIR and its backers. That would be a setback not merely for those of us who love Israel, but for anyone who still takes the battle against Islamist terror seriously.

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If the Sestak fiasco teaches us anything, it is – contrary to the advice of some in the “peace” camp – that the last thing we need to do is to start backing off on making sure our leaders understand that we are watching what they are doing.

Compared to Sestak’s folly, a little well-prepared pandering looks less like an “insult” and more like wise public policy.

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