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July 5, 2015 / 18 Tammuz, 5775
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Parshas Vayelech


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXIII No. 38 5773

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
September 21, 2012 – 5 Tishrei 5773
6:34 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 7:38 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Vayelech
Weekly Haftara: Shuvah Yisrael (Hosea 14:2-10)
Daf Yomi: Berachos 51
Mishna Yomit: Nedarim 7:2-3
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 128:4-6
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Parah Adumah, chap. 2-4
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:48 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:45 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

During the week between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur we perform the kapparos (atonement) ritual by making a substitute offering to Hashem. This is customarily done with a live chicken, but a live fish may also be used, and one can even give money for charity. The text of the accompanying prayer is found in the Yom Kippur Machzor.

This coming Shabbos is commonly referred to as Shabbos Shuvah, either due to its unique position during the days of repentance between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, or because of the Haftara, “Shuvah Yisrael” (Hosea 14:2‑10; Joel 2:15‑27 – some add Micah 7:18‑20) which we read on that Shabbos. Some refer to it as Shabbos Teshuva.

We recite the usual Shabbos prayers with all the textual changes and additions for Aseres Yemei Teshuva (Hamelech Hakadosh replaces HaKeil Hakadosh, Zochrenu lechayyim is added, etc.).

It is traditional for the rabbi to deliver a special Shabbos Shuva derasha consisting of Halacha and Aggada matters.

Mincha: as usual (with textual changes as above).

Maariv, Mot’za’ei Shabbos: all tefillos as usual however, no Vi’yehi Noam Ve’Ata Kadosh.

Tuesday morning Shacharis (Erev Yom Kippur): We recite the Selichos for Erev Yom Kippur, which consist of the shortest Selichos text of the year. We do not say Mizmor L’soda, Avinu Malkeinu nor Tachanun. After chatzos (midday, 12:50 p.m. E.D.T. in N.Y.C.) we immerse in the mikveh to ritually purify ourselves.

It is customary to partake of [a] festive meal[s] on Erev Yom Kippur since it is a positive precept to feast on that day (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 604:1; see also the Taz ad loc. – quoting Berachos 8b – that one should reduce his Torah learning on that day in order to fast well on Yom Kippur, and that “one who feasts and drinks on the 9th [of Tishrei] is considered as if he fasted on both the 9th and the 10th of Tishrei.”

Mincha is the usual weekday tefilla: Ashrei, half‑Kaddish and the Shemoneh Esreh; before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we insert the Viddui (confessional) whose text is found in the Machzor.

We are careful to complete the Seuda Mafsekes, the final meal before the fast, while it is yet day in order to add from the mundane to the holy, le’hosif michol al hakodesh (i.e., from the 9th day to the 10th day).

It is customary to light yahrzeit candles for the departed souls [of relatives] since we say Yizkor on Yom Kippur.

The beracha for lighting the candles is “Le’hadlik ner shel Yom Hakippurim,” followed by “Shehecheyanu.”

Kol Nidrei (6:29 p.m. N.Y.C., E.D.T.). We arrive at the synagogue early and don both kittel and tallis. (If one dons the tallis before sunset, he recites the blessing “le’his’atef batzitzis.”)

We remove two of the Sifrei Torah from the Ark and the chazzan, flanked by two of the congregation’s leaders, intones the Kol Nidrei prayer. The chazzan recites the Shehecheyanu, which the congregation says with him in an undertone (except for those who recited the Shehecheyanu at home when lighting the candles).

Maariv: We follow the text of the Machzor. At Kerias Shema we say “Baruch Shem Kevod Malchuso” aloud (on this day we are likened to the angels who praise Hashem with these words). The chazzan says half‑Kaddish and we recite the Shemoneh Esreh. Before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we add the Viddui.

Following the Shemoneh Esreh the chazzan and congregation chant various Piyyutim and recite the Viddui. We conclude with Avinu Malkenu, Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective Kaddish recitals (Nusach Sefarad say LeDavid Mizmor following the Shemoneh Esreh and then continue with Piyyutim as above.)

When we wake up in the morning we perform Netilas Yadayim by washing our fingers up to the knuckles only.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

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Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

Harry Koenigsberg
(Via E-Mail)

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

Harry Koenigsberg
(Via E-Mail)

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

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