Photo Credit:
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Netanyahu's office in Jerusalem. The staunchly pro-Israel Harper addressed the Knesset on Monday.

TORONTO – It took seven years, but one of Israel’s staunchest allies among world leaders made his maiden voyage to the Jewish state on Sunday.

In announcing the trip last month at a Jewish National Fund dinner, where he was being honored, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper called Israel “a light of freedom and democracy in what is otherwise a region of darkness” and pledged that the Jewish state “will always have Canada as a friend.”

Advertisement

Since his election in 2006, the Conservative prime minister has been full-throated, unapologetic and seemingly indifferent to consequence in his support for Israel.

Harper was the first Western leader to cut aid to the Palestinian Authority following Hamas’s 2006 seizure of power in Gaza and the first to withdraw from the second UN World Conference Against Racism, known as Durban II, saying the event would “scapegoat the Jewish people.”

Canada has sided openly with Israel in every one of its military operations since 2006. Harper’s Israeli counterpart, Benjamin Netanyahu, calls him Stephen, and the two speak regularly. And earlier this month, Harper appointed Vivian Bercovici, a Toronto lawyer and an outspoken Israel supporter, as Canada’s ambassador to Israel.

Canada’s 375,000 Jews have repaid the good will: Polls showed that for the first time, more than half of Canadian Jews (52 percent) voted for Harper’s Tories in the 2011 election, a historic departure from their traditional base in the Liberal Party.

However, Harper, an evangelical Christian, may be paying a price for supporting Israel. Canada failed in its 2010 bid for a seat on the UN Security Council for the first time, a result some attributed to its foreign policy in general and support for Israel in particular.

Politically, Harper also has little to gain and much to lose. The shift in Jewish voting has helped Conservatives only in about 10 of Canada’s 308 electoral districts, though Jewish voters in three key Toronto-area districts helped replace Liberal members of parliament with Conservatives, two of whom are Jewish themselves.

Among Muslims, a community roughly triple the size of Jews in Canada, Harper won a meager 12 percent in the last election.

“I do think his support for Israel is a principled one because he will stand to lose more non-Jewish votes than gain Jewish ones by his forthright defense of the country,” said Henry Srebrnik, who got to know Harper when he taught at the University of Calgary in the early 1990s and Harper represented the city in the House of Commons.

“I doubt there was any sudden epiphany when it comes to Israel, but more likely a growing, and probably somewhat religiously based, admiration for the Jewish state.”

Harper is Canada’s first evangelical prime minister in 50 years, and most observers accept that his faith plays some role in his support for Israel. Toronto Rabbi Philip Scheim, who will accompany Harper to Israel, dismissed the notion that Harper’s support for Israel is part of an “end-of-days, apocalyptic scenario.”

“I sense that he sees Israel as a manifestation of justice and a righting of historical wrongs, especially in light of the Holocaust,” Scheim said.

Norman Spector, who served as Canada’s ambassador to Israel from 1992 to 1995 under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, offers a simple reason for Harper’s pro-Israel stance.

“I think it’s simply that he is an intelligent man who has read widely and thought deeply about the issue,” Spector said.

(JTA)

Advertisement

3 COMMENTS

Comments are closed.

Loading Facebook Comments ...