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October 31, 2014 / 7 Heshvan, 5775
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The Montessori Method


We are born to learn, in whatever capacity we are able. We study the world with our senses, and try to understand it. Our special children have more of a challenge, but they are just as interested in knowing what is going on around them. We know that because we observe their keen interest in everything we do and say. We need to nurture this interest, to encourage it. The best way to help all children learn is to let them explore in any way they can. It needs to be said that although a Montessori classroom may look unstructured, the opposite is true. There is a strong curriculum in place, with the teacher monitoring each student’s progress closely. This is the fascinating story of how the Montessori method was developed, how it fits into our Jewish world, and how it can help our children with Special Needs.

The Founder’s Background

Maria Montessori was a scientist,  observer and  thinker. She was also somewhat rebellious, and  challenged many notions of her time. She was the first woman of her time to complete a medical degree, and she went on to specialize in research and education. She believed that all children are born with potential, and it is our job to help them find it. She believed in adapting the child’s environment to enable them to reach their full potential and that for children with Special Needs, it is even more important to be aware of and encourage this potential.

Dr. Montessori was particularly interested in helping children with Special Needs, and she became a voice for them while she studied psychiatry. She studied poor but “normal” children from the slums of Rome. She took the curriculum of the time and worked on changing it from teacher-based to student-driven, with the teacher serving as a guide. She found that when taught in this way, the students achieved more than adults thought they were capable of, and at earlier ages.

The key to Montessori learning is allowing children to go at their own pace. The work is done through hands-on learning—tangible materials they can manipulate in order to learn about their world. Another key is allowing younger children to mix with older children. The advantage to this is that there is no emphasis on being at a certain educational level due to one’s age. Also,  the older students sometimes teach the younger, which enhances the learning for both.

The Jewish Connection

More Jewish schools are starting to use the Montessori method in their instruction, although not all of them are considered strictly Montessori. The Luria Academy, a Brooklyn elementary school, is becoming a Montessori school, and its staff is currently being  trained in the methods. The school is noted for accepting students of all backgrounds, including non-Jews. However, all the students  learn Jewish topics such as Hebrew along with the history and geography of Israel, and they daven each day.

The Torah Montessori School was started in Chicago 6 years ago by Rivkah and Moshe Schack,  who dramatically changed direction in their lives when they felt the need for a different type of education for their child. They sold their accounting firm, completed two years of training, and opened up their own yeshiva based on Montessori ideals. Rivkah says that although there are some areas where Montessori is not a perfect fit, “there is a way to use it to make the most of ‘chinuch l’noar al pi darco (teaching a child according to his needs).” She says this Torah ideal and Montessori fit together perfectly, because that is exactly what the Montessori method does—it allows each child to learn the way he or she needs to.

More locally, Yocheved Sidof, a Brooklyn mother, had the same idea and went to Chicago to ask Rivkah how to start up a Torah Montessori school in Crown Heights, which would combine a deep connection with Torah while encouraging children to learn in their own way. This initiative  got off the ground in 2010. Yocheved  is now directing the Lamplighters Yeshiva. It began with a class of 12 boys ages 3-5, and now also has a 1st and 2nd grade class; next year, they plan to add a girls’ 1st and 2nd grade. The preschool now has girls, ages 3-5, also.

Yocheved is very excited about what this will do for the yeshiva worldShe described Lamplighters as “a Jewish school which employs Montessori methodology to reach every child.” Even though the Yeshiva is a Chabad school, its mission is to revolutionize Jewish education  for the benefit of the whole Jewish community.

Yocheved and the Schacks are working together to bring their message to the world; that you can help each child reach their potential through learning in their own way.

Rivkah travels between New York and Chicago in order to run both schools.  They also ran a five week training seminar for the Lamplighters’ teachers called CAPD—Chinuch Al Pi Darko (Capdtraining.org) this past summer. Rivkah explained that the training should imbue the teacher with a sense that every child needs their own education plan, even for those children who don’t have an IEP. They also do parent education, because  not everyone is willing to try something new.

Yocheved’s current goal is to turn Lamplighters into a model for other Jewish schools.  As Rivkah said, they keep modifying for success; after all, American Montessori International is really about being flexible. The methodology has been specifically modified to accommodate  the fact that the students are learning in multiple languages; in Lamplighters’, Hebrew is the first language taught. The next goals include expanding Lamplighters  through 8th grade, establishing it as a demonstration school and  finding new teaching technologies that can help improve education overall.

The Special Needs Connection

Several aspects of this type of learning mesh well with children with Special Needs. For example, if a child’s main difficulty is  sitting still and concentrating at a teacher-given task, in a Montessori classroom the child is free to move about and to concentrate on his or her particular interests. Also, the child is not required to pass  a formal test, or to cover a specified amount of material within a time limit.

As Mrs. Schack points out, including children with Special Needs  encourages the other children to respect those with challenges in their lives—promoting the concept of ahavas yisroel. For example, the Torah Montessori School has a few students with severe food allergies, so  to accommodate them, the school does not allow any outside food, and  sanitizes all the children every day.

For children who need  Occupational Therapy or Speech Therapy, the freer learning environment and individual learning pace allows them to get what they need and not miss any work. In addition, the children stay with the same teacher and don’t switch classrooms during the school day. This provides a more stable environment which is important for children who have emotional needs.

The downside here is that children with focus issues may find it more difficult to learn and complete their individual work with so much going on around them. Also, the students are expected to work independently. One who needs more attention from an adult teacher instead of just a peer may not receive it. Also, the teacher may  be fully trained in the Montessori method, but not have the background they need to work  with students with Special Needs. A regular Montessori classroom may also need to be modified to address accessibility issues.

Parents must choose what will work for their child. Some schools are specifically geared towards particular needs, such as the Lane Montessori School for Autism in Toronto. Its teachers are trained in ABA therapy and know how to work with autistic children.  They also scaffold, providing a support system while bringing the students toward more independent work, little by little.

Lori Bourne, in her blog, “Montessori is for Everyone,” also mentions the option of homeschooling, so the student who needs one-on-one attention combined with an atmosphere of learning can achieve this by working with a dedicated parent who has the appropriate materials needed for the child.

While it may take some work to find the right place, it is possible to find a Montessori learning environment that will work to help your child.

 

Sources: http://www.michaelolaf.net/maria.html

http://www.michaelolaf.net/montessori12-18.html

http://prospectheights.patch.com/articles/prospect-heights-school-set-to-expand

http://www.amshq.org/Family%20Resources/Montessori%20Education%20and%20Your%20Child.aspx

http://www.blog.montessoriforeveryone.com/montessori-and-the-special-needs-child.html

http://www.montessoriforeveryone.com/Lane-Montessori-School-for-Autism_ep_67-1.html

http://www.montessorispecialneeds.com/index/

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One Response to “The Montessori Method”

  1. Mushky Karp-Kulek says:

    Update: Torah Montessori School closed down in March 2013, primarily due to financial difficulties. However, it's former teachers are moving on to create their own Jewish Montessori Preschool this fall, called Shaarei Chinuch Day School. Check out http://www.scdayschool.com for more information.

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We are born to learn, in whatever capacity we are able. We study the world with our senses, and try to understand it. Our special children have more of a challenge, but they are just as interested in knowing what is going on around them. We know that because we observe their keen interest in everything we do and say. We need to nurture this interest, to encourage it.

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