web analytics
July 23, 2014 / 25 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



Home » Sections » Books »

Title: Dalet Amot

Title: Dalet Amot
Author: Rabbi Ari Enkin

 

      A breezy refresher course in some basics about Judaism, Dalet Amot is a necessary addition to bookshelves in Jewish homes, libraries and schools.

 

      Rabbi Ari Enkin’s choice of topics and his lighthearted yet serious approach to concepts and practices often forgotten in the rush of daily life makes suitable reading material for new ba’alei teshuva and life-long Orthodox Jews. The book’s clearly printed text is easy to understand, and the frequent humor on its pages facilitates a pleasant reading experience. The serious nature of providing correct information to uninformed or misinformed readers is paramount, and the author makes his points tactfully from cover to cover.

 

      Decent behavior is what Judaism is all about, and Rabbi Enkin’s book endorses it in a forthright, not-preachy manner. From pages 36-41, the author succinctly lists halachic sources that dictate proper eating habits, respectful food disposal, Grace After Meals priorities and required table manners. Sloppiness, waste and other boorish behavior are simply not “Jewish.”

 

      Geniza and the proper disposal of holy writings are enduring concerns in Jewish communities. The author notes his halachic sources when he specifies how Jewish written materials should be discarded after they become tattered and useless. Enkin presents the case for disposing of writings that lack Hashem’s name (e.g., Torah Tidbits, synagogue and school notices) by wrapping them in bags and putting them in garbage cans. He states that he is “opposed to the practice of taking every HaModia, Yated, etc. to a geniza. It horribly wastes mammon hekdesh and cemetery space. This is an issue that rabbis should bring to an end.”

 

      Menschlichkeit, decent behavior, extends to intellectual propriety and excess. The author addresses this troublesome area when he examines the topic of “celebrating” the death of the wicked, the deaths of haters of Israel and anti-Semites. Enkin presents “celebration” as an emotional response rather than as a party or ritual practice. It is a concise look at Jewish hashkafa, philosophy. A multifaceted insight into correct Jewish thought processes, it can properly arm Jewish readers for a correct Jewish response to the future deaths of additional enemies. The irony of Enkin’s closing comment on this chapter is a clue to how much we Jews must maintain proper perspective.

 

      Other chapters in Dalet Amot examine the proper observance of Shabbat and holidays, avoiding cruelty to animals, interpersonal issues and a female’s rights and roles and contributions in halachically directed Jewish life. Mystical and supernatural issues are touched upon, as well as other topics of wide-ranging interest.

 

      Readers might be puzzled regarding the spelling of the book’s title. Instead of the word “daled” with two “d’s,” in his title, the author used a “t” at the end. He addressed the issue by saying ” The letter dalet is spelled dalet-lamed-tav. The ‘d’ sound in the last letter of the name ‘Yocheved,’ for instance, emerges from the letter. There is a difference. After much research it was concluded that the fourth letter of the alef-beit is truly ‘dalet‘ and is etymologically related to the Hebrew word for ‘door.’ The entire book was prepared with Sephardic pronunciation to allow for clarity and easier reading.

 

      Stores and individuals may order copies at rabbiari@hotmail.com or call 011-972-52-579-1773.

About the Author: Yocheved Golani is the author of highly acclaimed "It's MY Crisis! And I'll Cry If I Need To: EMPOWER Yourself to Cope with a Medical Challenge" (http://booklocker.com/books/3067.html). It addresses and solves many needs of disabled, ill and recovering readers.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Title: Dalet Amot”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
The new peace partners; Hams leader Khaleed Meshaal (L) and Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas
Khaled Mashaal Rejects Ceasefire and Says Israel Must Disarm for Peace
Latest Sections Stories
book-Family-Frayda

Written entirely through Frayda’s eyes, the reader is drawn by her unassuming personality.

book-I-Kings

Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed.

book-Unify-A-Nation

While Lipman comes from an ultra-Orthodox background and is an Orthodox rabbi, he offers a breath of fresh air when he suggests that “polarization caused by extremism and isolationism in the religious community may be the greatest internal threat to the future of the Jewish people”

The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten defines a mentch as “someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character.”

Certainly today’s communication via e-mail, Facebook, Twitter and the like, including the ubiquitous Whatsapp, has reduced the need to talk with people and communicate at length.

These two special women utilized their incredibly painful experience as an opportunity to assist others.

Maybe we don’t have to lose that growth and unity that we have achieved, especially with the situation in Eretz Yisrael right now.

Sleepily, I watched him kissing Mai’s chubby thighs.

I have always insisted that everything that happens to anyone or anything is min Shamayim.

My teachers like me and they tell my parents that I am a great girl with good middos.

The chicken and waffle nuggets were fabulous and were like chicken in a dessert form.

“Have you forgotten your dreams?” The Hope Merchant asks a defeated and hopeless Lily when she “happens” upon his shop.

The universe was created by God out of nothing; it has not always existed.

More Articles from Yocheved Golani
Esther Grinberg

Tehilim 71:9 reads “Do not cast me off in the time of old age; Do not forsake me when my strength fails.” The message is apropos to the endeavor – wonder and spirituality ruled as respect for aging heroes of the Shoah increased among Leo Baeck students.

book-Kosher-Grapevine

Title: The Kosher Grapevine: Exploring the World of Wine
Author: Irving Langer
Publisher: Gefen

Breathe deeply. You’ll need maximum physical and spiritual power to absorb the uplifting lessons in this book. Page 249 explains why some Jews are praised as “fish on dry land,” a phrase that describes Moshe Rabeinu. Am Yisrael began to appreciate his depth of character at kriat Yam Suf, realizing that “he lived in the revealed world as though he were in the concealed world.”

Author Irving Langer provides his own look at wine-making as well as the nature of the storage barrels used to age wines for taste perfection. He intersperses the book with Jewish historical facts and figures, a few jokes and photographs, and advice on how to pair wines with specific foods.

Unlike formulaic biographies from popular publishing houses in the Orthodox Jewish world, Beyond Politics is not predictable. The vignettes of individual men and women who trekked through Ethiopia and Sudan, flew in from Austria, India, and Algeria, or were born on Israeli soil are gritty, adventurous, and heartwarming.

Title: The Koren Ethiopian Haggada Journey to Freedom: Celebrating Ethiopian Jewish History, Traditions & Customs
Editor: Rabbi Menachem Waldman
Publisher: Koren Publishing

Most of the No-Potato Passover recipes are as casual as the title’s spelling: some include only six ingredients and limited prep time – half to one full hour. They’re good for heart health and waistlines, too.

The Hebrew-English haggada provides a wealth of photographic evidence of the lives led by Ethiopian Jews. The pottery, the unembellished homes, school, and synagogues, the gaunt Jews in modest clothing and head coverings portray dedication to Torah values despite harsh political and topographical conditions.

    Latest Poll

    Israel's Iron Dome Anti-Missile System:





    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-dalet-amot/2006/08/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: