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April 21, 2014 / 21 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Bertrand Russell’

Henry Shaw & Names

Sunday, August 18th, 2013

What’s in a name? My late father had an only sibling called Henry Shaw. We loved our Uncle Hashy as we called him. He was huge, almost six-and-a-half feet tall, and had to stoop to get through the doors of our house. He had a deep but soft bass voice and a wonderful sense of humor. He was a marvelous raconteur, steeped in Yiddish culture and the intricacies of internal Jewish political warfare in Eastern Europe. His greatest impact on my life was the range of experiences he introduced me to, from Chazanut to Verdi’s Requiem, from Hillel Zeitlin to AJP Taylor, from Martin Buber to Bertrand Russell. He was less charismatic than my father, less combative, but a much more approachable person.

He qualified in social studies at London University and spent his life devoted to the Jewish Community, first in London in the Association of Jewish Youth, then running Hillel House in Endsleigh Street, London. He and his devoted wife, Sybil, provided a home from home for thousands of Jewish students from around the world for over twenty years. I saw most of him in my own student years and he was very supportive and encouraging. But then they ‘disappeared’ from my life and went off to Australia to take over the Hillel Foundation of Victoria which involved the Melbourne and Monash Universities. Five years later Henry switched to academia to help establish a Jewish studies program at Prahran College. His work eventually morphed into the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilization at Monash. Sybil died in 1978, but Henry flourished until 1996.

I am writing this piece because this week is his Yahrzeit. But also because I am embarrassed to admit that I never found out why he adopted the surname Shaw. Which leads me to the issue of Jewish surnames. We Jews never really took them very seriously. Napoleon’s civil reforms insisted that everyone had to have a surname. Previously non-Jews had Christian names (yes, that’s what first names were called in Britain until the sixties) and Jews had Jewish names on to which occasionally one added a location or a profession. When the law of the land insisted on surnames Jews usually took their profession, the town they came from, or a Latin version of a Hebrew word like Benedict or Priest. Amongst themselves they invariably used only Hebrew names, until the process of acculturation took hold. This explains why Jews tended to be rather cavalier about changing their civil names or having them changed by others.

My paternal grandparents came from Radomsk. My grandmother was a Bialystock, the name of a Polish town. My grandfather’s family name was a more Russian, Rozrasowski . During the great migrations of over a hundred years ago, lots of migrants took or had simpler or more western names given to them as they came through immigration. You have heard of the old Jewish gentleman called, improbably, Shawn Fergusson because when he arrived at immigration in a state of exhaustion and shock and was asked his name he said in Yiddish, “Shoyn Fergessen“ (“I forgotten.”). Or the Chinese man called Moishe Greenberg because as he came through after a Jewish migrant and gave his name as Sam Ting, they thought he meant “the same thing”.

Seriously, when the Rozrasowskis came to London in the early part of the twentieth century the family simplified its name to Rosen. They must have thought it would sound more English! There were five girls and four boys. The boys decided that they’d rather be known by their first names, so as to differentiate themselves. That was how my Grandfather Shlomo came to be known as Mr. Solomons. Indeed his tombstone in Dublin (where he moved during the Depression) gives his name as “Mr. Sydney Solomons (Rosen)”.

My father was always known as Rosen, but his elder brother Hashy became Shaw. Was it to sound more English, or actually Irish? Shaw is a popular Irish name. When his parents moved to Ireland this was an era in which when getting a job or an apartment with a Jewish name was as difficult as getting one with an African name fifty years later. Or was it just a play on Henry’s nickname Hashy? One family tradition had it that he had lost his papers and got an Irish passport on the black market. The most improbable was that he had accidentally killed an anti-Semitic drunk in a fight and carried his name as a penance. Who knows? He never gave me a straight answer.

But if you think this story strange, let me tell you about my maternal grandfather, Moishe Yaakov Cohen, known as MJ. He was born Moishe Shumacher in Uman in the Ukraine. As a boy he emigrated to Tredegar in Wales. There he was taken under the wing of a relative whose name was Cohen, who had become the godfather of Jewish peddlers servicing the isolated Welsh mining villages of the Rhonda with haberdashery and other supplies that the miners paid for in installments. The peddlers went out on foot on a Sunday with goods provided by Mr. Cohen and did not come back till Friday to spend Shabbes together and make up the minyan. It was suggested to Moishe that if he had the same name as the boss it would inspire confidence. So Moishe Shumacher, the Levi from Uman, became MJ Cohen. Soon he did well enough to set himself up in business on his own in Manchester as MJ Cohen, General Draper (a fancy name for selling odds and ends). Later he transferred to Cardiff. One day he sent a letter back home on his notepaper inviting relatives to come and join him. When they read the invitation they had no idea who MJ Cohen was, but they did recognize the word “General” and assumed he’d been promoted in the army and had changed his name to Draper. Which explains why we once had relatives in Manchester called Draper.

All these people I have mentioned here only had one Hebrew name from the beginning to the end, names that linked them directly to their heritage of millennia. Their surnames were secondary, like a chameleon’s skin. But they, like my Uncle Hashy, were and are all proud and contributing members of the Jewish people. As far as I am concerned that’s what counts.

Title: Search Judaism – Judaism’s Answers to a Changing World

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Title: Search Judaism – Judaism’s Answers to a Changing World


Author: Yitzchok Fingerer


Publisher: Targum Press


  


 


   Skepticism about the existence of Hashem reigns supreme in some circles and there is clearly no shortage of unabashed atheists circulating in the literary world, blogosphere, and the media. Tragically, it is the Jew that has been most affected by the deluge of misinformation spewed forth by those who question the veracity of G-d’s existence while they fecklessly attempt to navigate the vicissitudes of life.

 

   Search Judaism by Rabbi Yitzchok Fingerer is a new scrupulously researched hashkafah book. It is a repository of exceptionally enlightening information culled from both religious and secular sources on the eternal questions of moral relativism, free choice, pleasure and happiness, good and evil, the meaning of modesty, reincarnation, why bad things happen to good people, divine revelation and the essence of our souls.

 

   Most importantly, this book focuses on how these Divine concepts help to refine our character and sharpen our middos. While this book is not specifically geared for intellectuals of the secular humanist genre, it does address issues related to G-d from an empirical perspective; and with a level of gravitas that would appeal to the denizens of the world of academia.

 

   Yet and still, this book is for all thinking Jews; irrespective of background and level of observance. Its pages are punctuated by poignant stories and pithy anecdotes, as Rabbi Fingerer posits himself as an earnest maggid shiur and courageously offers a refreshingly honest treasure trove of answers to such questions as “Does G-d exist?”, “Is our free choice pre-determined?”, “Did a Divine revelation really take place?”, “Whose morality do we follow?”, among others.

 

   Utilizing a plethora of Torah and Talmudic sources along with the timeless wisdom of our rabbinic sages as a solid foundation, he explores the findings of such psychologists as Yale professor Stanley Milgram, repentant atheists as British professor Antony Flew and controversial figures as Harvard professor of ethics, Bertrand Russell.

 

   Analyzing their reports and nuanced data, Rabbi Fingerer proves that true morality cannot be self-defined and that despite critical scientific modalities for research, the omnipotence of G-d is readily apparent. He makes it abundantly clear that the Torah is not just an isolated study in ethics in which one can divorce himself, but a genuine, hands on “road map to life” that, if studied properly, becomes infused in the fiber of our very beings.

 

   Search Judaism will serve as an invaluable resource for frum yidden and ba’alei teshuva alike, who harbor lingering, unresolved hashkafah questions and the facts presented here are a must read for kiruv professionals and lay people in their quest to bring alienated Jews on a path back to Hashem and a Torah life.

Title: Search Judaism – Judaism’s Answers to a Changing World

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Title: Search Judaism – Judaism’s Answers to a Changing World

Author: Yitzchok Fingerer

Publisher: Targum Press

  

 

   Skepticism about the existence of Hashem reigns supreme in some circles and there is clearly no shortage of unabashed atheists circulating in the literary world, blogosphere, and the media. Tragically, it is the Jew that has been most affected by the deluge of misinformation spewed forth by those who question the veracity of G-d’s existence while they fecklessly attempt to navigate the vicissitudes of life.

 

   Search Judaism by Rabbi Yitzchok Fingerer is a new scrupulously researched hashkafah book. It is a repository of exceptionally enlightening information culled from both religious and secular sources on the eternal questions of moral relativism, free choice, pleasure and happiness, good and evil, the meaning of modesty, reincarnation, why bad things happen to good people, divine revelation and the essence of our souls.

 

   Most importantly, this book focuses on how these Divine concepts help to refine our character and sharpen our middos. While this book is not specifically geared for intellectuals of the secular humanist genre, it does address issues related to G-d from an empirical perspective; and with a level of gravitas that would appeal to the denizens of the world of academia.

 

   Yet and still, this book is for all thinking Jews; irrespective of background and level of observance. Its pages are punctuated by poignant stories and pithy anecdotes, as Rabbi Fingerer posits himself as an earnest maggid shiur and courageously offers a refreshingly honest treasure trove of answers to such questions as “Does G-d exist?”, “Is our free choice pre-determined?”, “Did a Divine revelation really take place?”, “Whose morality do we follow?”, among others.

 

   Utilizing a plethora of Torah and Talmudic sources along with the timeless wisdom of our rabbinic sages as a solid foundation, he explores the findings of such psychologists as Yale professor Stanley Milgram, repentant atheists as British professor Antony Flew and controversial figures as Harvard professor of ethics, Bertrand Russell.

 

   Analyzing their reports and nuanced data, Rabbi Fingerer proves that true morality cannot be self-defined and that despite critical scientific modalities for research, the omnipotence of G-d is readily apparent. He makes it abundantly clear that the Torah is not just an isolated study in ethics in which one can divorce himself, but a genuine, hands on “road map to life” that, if studied properly, becomes infused in the fiber of our very beings.

 

   Search Judaism will serve as an invaluable resource for frum yidden and ba’alei teshuva alike, who harbor lingering, unresolved hashkafah questions and the facts presented here are a must read for kiruv professionals and lay people in their quest to bring alienated Jews on a path back to Hashem and a Torah life.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/books/title-search-judaism-judaisms-answers-to-a-changing-world/2010/02/17/

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