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November 30, 2015 / 18 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Chanukah’

Boy Arrested Trying to Recreate Chanukah on Temple Mount

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

Police arrested a Jewish boy Wednesday morning who had planned to go up to the Temple Mount.

In the boy’s bag police found a Chanukiah, oil candles and matches, according to Tazpit News Agency.

Clearly the boy wasn’t familiar enough with the original story of Chanukah.

When the police began to approach him, he should have started to play with the dreidel.

The boy is being represented by Honeinu lawyers.


Monday, December 15th, 2014

I had a little dreidel,
I made it out of clay,
and when it’s dry and ready,
O dreidel I shall play.


Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Improving Efficiency at the Kotel and 24 Million Sufganiyot in Israel on Chanukah

Monday, December 9th, 2013


Malkah returns for this segment! Yishai kicks off talking about his idea to improve efficiency at the Kotel and a recent phone call he made- by accident. They move on to take a call from our occasional guest Dominican Friar Erik Ross who gives an update from Switzerland. To wrap up, Yishai presents a special song performed live in studio by musician Binyamin Nakonechny.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Knesset Update and Hollow Negotiations in the Middle East

Sunday, December 8th, 2013


Yishai is joined by our Knesset insider Jeremy Man Saltan. They give updates on what is currently going on within the Israeli government and how both Israel and the Palestinians are continuing talks despite neither side actually having any intent on making any changes. Yishai takes a call from a listener and presents a Chanukah song.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Making Chanukah Meaningful for the Entire Family

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

Parenting and Education

The Hebrew word Chanukah means both “education” and “dedication.” To be a parent is to be an educator, and the essence of Jewish parenting is to teach your children what to be dedicated to. The secret of parenting is to appreciate the nuances of your child’s nature and to educate him or her accordingly. No two children are alike, yet every child needs to learn that it’s wrong to steal. Personalities vary, but the need to be kind and compassionate is universal.

A central theme of Chanukah is the responsibility of every parent to teach their children about what is important in life and what’s not so important; what has genuine and enduring value and what has only limited value; what principles demand devotion and dedication; what is morally and Jewishly negotiable, and what is not.

Underestimate Yourself? Never!

Chanukah challenges us with a stirring spiritual opportunity. Consider the small jar of oil. On the outside, it appeared to be a vessel capable of holding just one day’s worth of oil, while on the inside lay an entirely different reality. This is us too: No matter where we are in life, we still possess the inner ability to recast the form of our vessels. Often in life, we conclude that certain things “are me,” while others are “not me.” Chanukah is a time to reconsider what we have decided is “just not me” and to open ourselves to another dimension of potential—a dimension we may have needlessly defined as being beyond our reach.

Chanukah is a whisper in our souls that says: In our hands we hold the moist clay of our own lives. Potters of the spirit, we possess a far-reaching ability to shape from everything we are, the vessel we long to be.

Family Lights: How to Make Chanukah More Fun

On the surface, Chanukah appears to be about a revolt and a victory; a jar of oil and a miracle; and presents and potato latkes. Beneath the surface, it’s about the supreme importance of family. After all, the Chanukah revolt was spearheaded by a family, the Hasmoneans, and the story of Chana and her sons embodies the meaning of Chanukah. Similarly, the Greeks enacted specific decrees aimed at the heart of Jewish marriage and family life, and it was the devotion of Jewish women and mothers that was instrumental in thwarting those efforts.

The fact that family is so central to Chanukah teaches us that the Jewish family is absolutely central to the enduring vibrancy of the Jewish people. The following is a list of ideas that you can incorporate into your family’s celebration that will make the holiday more meaningful and fun than ever.

Latke Time : Peeling and grating potatoes, preparing the batter, and then the frying; potato latkes lend themselves to a fun family cooking experience, followed, of course, by a yummy family Chanukah dinner.

The Eight Nights of Chanukah Family Journal: A binder with sections for each person in the family. Each night, after candle lighting, everyone writes two items on their page

i) Something they respect, admire, or love about each member of the family.

ii) Something that makes them thankful or proud to be a Jew.

On the eighth night, each person can read what they wrote to the entire family. The binder is saved and grows year after year.

Story time: Each night, as a family, either read a story about Chanukah, or a brief selection from a book about Chanukah.

Dreidel: Put the Play Station and all the other high tech games away, and play a family game of dreidel. All it takes is a dreidel, a big pile of beans, pennies, lego pieces or whatever, and you will see how simple and wonderful, family bonding can be.

Share the Light: Contact a local Jewish convalescent or nursing home, find out when they have a candle lighting ceremony, and join in. The residents will absolutely love having your family there.

Shimon Apisdorf has authored ten books that have sold over a quarter million copies and have won two Benjamin Franklin awards. His family moved to Israel in the summer of 2012. You can learn more about him at www.shimonapisdorf.com

Only in Israel: Subaru Sprocket Menorah

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Winter in Israel is coming and rain is predicted for tomorrow – Yay! And the first rain always reminds me to… tune up my Subaru in preparation for the weather.

So this morning I headed out to Talpiot, Jerusalem, where the Subaru garage has always served me well. I like the service, I like the personnel, and, well, I like Subaru. My late father A”H had a Subaru when we lived in Israel, when I was a boy, and then as today, Subaru has remained a dependable car.

There is yet another reason to respect Subaru. From 1969 till the late 80’s, Subaru was the only Japanese car company that sold to Israel. (I even read that Subaru brand was actually created for the Israeli market). The other, bigger companies were kowtowing to the Arab boycott till they got wise. So if you’re wondering why there are so many Subarus in Israel, you got your answer.

Anyway, as I was saying, I drove into the garage to do the routine winter tuneup, but this year it was Chanukah. Now, I have a personal proclivity – I want to see some Chanukah paraphernalia when I come into an establishment. Maybe it’s my time in the U.S. and seeing how the gentiles do Christmas, but I want Chanukah to be big.

But as I looked around, I saw no secretaries eating Sufganiyot (jelly doughnuts) and no mechanics spinning draidel. I pulled over Gabi, the head mechanic. “Gabi, where is Chanukah here?”  But Gabi is a proud Jew. He dragged me over to the waiting room and showed me this:

Wow! It turns out that Avi, a mechanic in the shop, has a penchant for making the coolest Chanukiahs (menorahs) ever, from old Subaru parts, and every evening, at the prescribed time, the whole garage lights the Subaru Sprocket Chanukiah.

Avi took out his phone and showed me the other Chanukiyot that he has made. He explained how he used a mechanical press and silicone glue to ensure that the various Chanukiah car parts are oil tight so that a wick can be placed directly and lit.

When I started taking pictures, all the mechanics were so happy to show their garage’s unique Chanukah contribution. I promised them that I would put up the photo in the Jewish Press as my contribution to the pirsumei nisa aspect, the publicizing of the miracle of Chanukah. But, really, the miracle of Chanukah is the miracle of Israel and the  love of good Jerusalem mechanics for the traditions of the Jewish people.

Well, Subaru, you have done it again. You stood up to tyranny in the past, and with this new Chanukiah you once again shine. Maybe one day I will be able to afford a new Forester…

Long live Subaru! Long live Chanukah!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/only-in-israel-the-subaru-sprocket-chanukiah/2013/12/03/

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