web analytics
September 1, 2014 / 6 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘emergency’

Those Sneaky Zionists

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Dateline – Israel. 9:15 PM

This post was updated and corrected at 11:45PM from the original version following the release of additional information from the COGAT office.

A 15 year old Palestinian teenager from Gaza has been transported to Israel for emergency medical treatment in the Kaplan Medical Center in Rehovot.

The Arab teenager was seriously injured while preparing to launch a Palestinian Qassam rocket at Israeli civilians in Southern Israel, when the rocket suddenly malfunctioned and exploded. COGAT indicates that a second boy was killed in the attempted attack, and that the Palestinians tried to blame Israel for his death.

The explosion took place in Jabalya in Gaza.

 

Photo Illustration: Palestinians in Gaza prepare to shoot Qassam rockets at Israeli civilians in southern Israel.

Greece Jews to Receive an Entire $1 million in Emergency Aid from JAFI

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Shalom Life reports that the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel voted to provide emergency aid to the Jewish community of Greece, in order to address immediate needs in the wake of their country’s crippling financial crisis.

Agency Executive Natan Sharansky convened the urgent leadership meeting of the organization’s leadership, which decided to provide around $1 million over two years to help the Greek Jewish community prevail.

Earlier this month, the Jewish Press reported on salary levels at JAFI, and from that report it appears that the agency’s current emergency support for the Greek Jewish community each of the two years will be just $250,000 short of the agency’s chief fundraiser, Dr. Misha Galperin, who will be taking home $750,000 a year.

Shalom Life reports that the funds will enable communal institutions to continue operations, including programs to strengthen their ties with Israel and the development of unique aliyah tracks for those wishing to immigrate to Israel.

The aid package will be funded by the Jewish Agency and by its partners, Keren Hayesod-United Israel Appeal (UIA) and the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews.

Around 7,500 Jews live in Greece, with 3,500 in Athens and an additional 1,000 in Thessaloniki. The Jewish community operates synagogues, a Jewish school, a museum, and a soup kitchen.

The Jewish Chronicle reported last week that “the main reason for the tanking incomes of Athens community members is that many rely for business on the property market, which like elsewhere in Europe, has come crashing down. Rents have tumbled along with property prices.” The JC explains that tenants demand a 30 per cent reduction in rent from their landlords, and many leave, breaking their contracts, since their businesses had gone under.

Perhaps the JAFI Board of Governors should be encouraged to spend their vacations near these two Jewish centers and trickle down some of their income, which is alleged to be among the highest in the world of Jewish fund-raising, into the pockets of the near-bankrupt Greek Jews.

JAFI officials could visit the Jewish museum in Athensn (see image) – and maybe leave a nice tip for the staff.

Saving Lives in Judea and Samaria – The Untold Story

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

A common phenomenon in Judea and Samaria is that many Palestinians turn to the IDF and to Israeli medical emergency services to receive medical attention. Local Arabs, whether ill or wounded, receive immediate life-saving medical treatment regardless of existing security tensions, and with no prerequisites.

A recent case is that of a two year old infant who was treated by Magen David Adom (MDA) medics and the Kfir battalion medical staff after being critically wounded by his father, who accidentally hit him with his car. The family brought the child to the main gate at Neve Tsuf, where he received first-responder treatment.

Two weeks later, IDF medical officials and local volunteers treated two Palestinians that were brought to Neve Tsuf after falling from a high elevation and suffering moderate injuries to their limbs and spinal columns. They were later evacuated to a hospital in Ramallah.

Neve Tsuf is one of several Jewish settlements that provide medical care to local Arabs. Israeli medical services primarily tend to Palestinians wounded in car accidents throughout Judea and Samaria, usually between Palestinian vehicles.

An agreement was signed between Palestinian Red Crescent and the MDA, ensuring the use of MDA’s advanced equipment by Red Crescent. By virtue of this agreement, Red Crescent ambulances pass through military checkpoints without inspection, and occasionally abuse this privilege to transport weapons.

Medical treatment by Israeli medical officials is provided even during periods of increased security tensions, such as Arab riots, stone throwing, and various assaults on Jewish residents of Judea and Samaria, including a stone-throwing attack on an ambulance from Neve Tsuf over a month ago.

And yet, the humanitarian aid provided to Arabs in Judea and Samaria has not been picked up on or published by the media.

MK Aryeh Eldad of The National Union party, a former commanding officer of the military medical corps in the IDF, stated: “In any case when emergency medical care is required, it is to be provided regardless of gender, race, nationality or religion, whether he’s a friend or foe. Thus, the IDF and MDA must offer medical care if it is needed immediately, eligibility for medical insurance not withstanding. Every doctor and medic in the army takes an oath to conduct themselves in this fashion. The world at large knows little about these occurrences; “the world” is more interested in incidents of harm brought to Arabs rather then cases of treating them. There is no doubt the world should know more about these activities”.

Jerusalem district MDA spokesman, Danny Rotenberg, added that the MDA, as a national rescue organization, provides emergency care services throughout the entire State of Israel, including Judea and Samaria. He said that the population of Judea and Samaria includes an Arab segment, and when the MDA receives an emergency call, it is understood that they are morally obligated to provide medical care via the medical teams dispersed throughout Judea and Samaria.

When asked about the funding of medical treatment for Palestinians, Rotenberg points out that it’s a sensitive issue. The MDA never stipulates the provision of medical care with the ability to pay for it. First, medical care is provided, and then the issue of reimbursement is examined on an individual basis. “We hope that through cooperation in emergency cases of this kind, we are acquiring ambassadors of good will on the basis of the love of human kindness regardless of religion, age or nationality”. Avigdor Shatz, Director of the security department in the Benyamin regional municipality, said in a statement: “This phenomenon exists in other settlements in Judea and Samaria, although not as frequently as in Neve Tsuf, which is situated on a main route, and therefore is more accessible to the Palestinian population”. He added that as a professional he offers support to anyone who requires it. “I think this is a part of a basic set of ethics which anyone who provides medical care should have. And this is how we conduct ourselves. The number of Palestinian casualties in car accidents we treat is immense, and does not consist only of those who seek care at the front gate”.

When posed with the question of whether the Palestinian population and their representatives conveyed any expressions of gratitude, he replied that there is a big gap between what actually happens and between what the politicians report on our side, as well as what is publicized outwardly. “This aspect is of less interest to me, I don’t think the Palestinian Authority has expressed any gratitude except in two cases which occurred in the Palestinian Authority’s territory. In one case, a large purification facility collapsed while the concrete was being laid, and we came and rescued tens of casualties and treated them. In another case, a building in El-Bira collapsed; an entire floor fell in, we arrived with other medical teams such as the IDF’s search and rescue unit, and provided medical care and evacuated the wounded. In the first case the engineer’s company which designed the facility published a newspaper ad thanking us, and in the second case the governor of Ramallah thanked us personally”.

Immigrant Absorption Minister: ‘Ethiopian Immigrants Should Be Grateful To Israel’

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Immigrant Absorption Minister and Yisrael Beitenu MK Sofa Landver said on Wednesday that Ethiopian immigration representatives in the Knesset should be grateful to Israel.

Landver made the comments during an emergency session held by the Knesset Committee for Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Affairs to investigate the issue of discrimination against Ethiopians in Kiryat Malachi. She was responding to an Ethiopian representative, Gadi Desta, who told the MKs that “apartheid” was taking place.

The emergency session was convened against the backdrop of a news report that local homeowners’ committees in Kiryat Malachi consistently refuse to sell or rent property to Ethiopians.

Is It Still Okay If Your Father Cries?

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009

The phone rang. It was a call I’d been dreading.

“Well, are you going to pick it up?” asked my wife after the third ring.

Bobbie, my dad’s wife, was calling as we had agreed she would in the event of a life-threatening emergency. My father was dying of stage-four colon cancer.

“Alan, I’m taking your father to the emergency room.”

As I learned later that morning, Bobbie had rushed him back to the hospital for severe chemotherapy induced incontinence.

“Dad’s inside,” she said, nodding toward the treatment room.

“My God, what am I walking into here?” I wondered. Bobbie followed me in. The air was fetid. Dad lay atop a gurney wearing a loosely tied hospital gown. He had lost so much weight that his skin fit him like an over-sized suit. His yellowish skin tone reminded me of the corpses I had seen as a Chevra Kadisha volunteer. I trembled in fear of my father’s life.

“Alan?” Dad whispered. He grasped my hand with his still powerful clench.

“Yes, Dad, I’m right here.” We both managed a little smile.

Sarah, the head nurse, suggested that Bobbie and I leave but nodded approvingly when I stayed at my father’s side.

Moments later, the door opened.

“Dr. Busch?” inquired a young resident who had affixed his black suede kippah with two clips.

“Shalom aleichem. I’m Alan Busch, Dr. Busch’s son,” I spoke up.

“I’m Dr. Benjamin Finerman. Aleichem shalom,”he replied. “Dr. Busch,” he addressed my father, “we’re just waiting for the paperwork to admit you. I thought I’d come by and introduce myself.” “May your father have a refuah sheleimah,” he whispered to me as he turned to leave.

We were exhausted after Dad’s first 48 hours. The chronic incontinence had turned the end of his life into a nightmare. It was a battle we fought incessantly for two weeks.

The doctors prescribed several treatments. Their ineffectiveness frustrated and fatigued us.

I desperately called my dad’s gastroenterologist at 5 a.m. “Doctor, the tincture of opium you prescribed hasn’t worked.

“The incontinence is destroying him faster than his cancer.”

“I’ve tried everything I know,” he wearily admitted, “but if the tincture is not working, I do not know how to stop it.” My heart sank.

We requested another consultation with the oncologist. “The prognosis varies with each person,” he explained. “This could go on for 3-6 months, or even a year. There is nothing more we can do for him here.”

Dad was not ready to go home, but the hospital was ready to discharge him the next day. We were running short of time. Dad was worn out. We needed a break. Ron went for a coffee while I wandered over to one of several family lounges overlooking Lake Michigan. It was one of those moments when you just stare out the window lost in thought.

I suddenly heard the voice of my mentor, Reb Isser, zt”l:”Davening is like dialing long distance to ‘De Aibishter.’ Call His number every day and pray with all your heart. You may get a busy signal, as lots of folks are trying to reach Him. So be patient or leave a message. He returns every call.”

“Alan, do you mind if I join you?” Ron asked from the hallway. We sat down together.

“Dad’s situation is so sad,” he began. “His incontinence is causing him so much suffering. I’ve heard him quietly crying.”

That evening, Ron, looking weary, went back to Dad’s apartment to sleep while I stayed the night with our father.

“Is it still okay if your father cries?” I mused while watching Dad sleep at 3 a.m.

“Everything alright in here?” whispered our night nurse Barb, who had poked her head in.

“Good morning, Barb. I’m going to step out for a bit, okay?”

“No problem,” she answered, “I’ll look in after him. You go ahead.”

I returned to the same lounge. No other souls were around. Again, I heard the whisper of Reb Isser’s voice. “Be patient,”he counseled. “De Aibishter will pick up. You’ll see.”

“Ribbono shel Olam,” I began my silent prayer. “My father, Avrum ben Rose, calmly awaits the end of his days. Please heal his bowel so that he may live them out in dignity and peace.”

And so, I waited to hear from Him – “Who heals all flesh and performs wonders.”

My cell phone rang the next day.

“Good morning, Alan!”

“Dad?” I nearly panicked. “You’re still home, right?”

“It’s worked!” he shouted excitedly. “The tincture has finally kicked in.”

“So Dad, tell me how you feel?” I asked, sharing his excitement.

“Sonny Boy, I feel I feel,” his voice cracked ever so slightly. “I feel like I’ve so much to be thankful for.”

Cancer was killing my father – who chose life while he was dying.

The mighty combination of his unyielding determination to reclaim his body and the power oftefillah won out in the end.

Dad died on Shabbos morning, October 18, 2008. I stood at his side, held his hand, and watched as he gently departed this world. All was serene on the face of this man, avi mori, whose dignity had been restored.

***

Editor’s note: There is a correction to the December 4 Lessons in Emunah column, A Chuppah Tale.

It was the bride’s father who spoke under the chuppah. He told of his miraculous recovery from a two-month long coma, heart attack and case of Legionnaires Disease, which is usually fatal. When he asked his rabbi how he merited such a miracle, his ravasked him if he had ever done anything special for a widow or an orphan. It was then that he recalled the woman who could not afford to pay for the groceries that she needed from his store. He marked everything down and told her she would pay when she could. But when her husband died he told her not to worry about the bill. He was canceling it, but continued to give her food.

But now he was paid back in a way he could never imagine, as the groom standing alongside his daughter under the chuppahwas the grandson of that very same widow.

The Shabbos Blessing

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Friday was a hectic day. The night before, I had been rushed to the emergency room after feeling unwell. I was released early in the morning, and was given a copy of my EKG. I brought the EKG results to my cardiologist first thing in the morning.

When the doctor read the EKG, he was concerned that I might have suffered a heart attack. He whisked me by taxi to the emergency room at Beth Israel Hospital. They immediately gave me a room, did another EKG, and rushed me to the catheterization lab on the eighth floor.

It was Erev Shabbos, a short Friday. The last place I’d expected to be was an operating room. I calmed myself down with the thought that it was too late to go home, so I might as well accept the fact that I would be spending this Shabbos in a hospital bed.

It was finally my turn for the procedure. All I could focus on was the clock with the minute hand counting down to candle-lighting time. The doctors were doing their job, and I was trying to figure out how I would be able to light the candles on time. They kept asking me how I was feeling, and I kept asking them what time it was.

The clock showed 4:50 p.m. Shabbos was at 5:09 p.m. I looked up and saw two overhead operating lights. I realized that the only way I would be able to bentch licht (light the candles) this Shabbos would be to recite the blessing over the electric lights. I recited the blessing and beseeched Hashem to please let them finish the procedure before Shabbos started.

Finally, the doctor was done. He came around the curtain and said, “We have good news for you! We didn’t find any problems. You are clear to go.”

I smiled and asked, “What time is it?”

It was 5:07.

I whispered, “Thank you, Hashem, for your Hashgachah Pratis (Divine Providence).”

Quick Takes: News From Israel You May Have Missed

Wednesday, February 18th, 2009

The Obama administration has promised the Palestinian Authority that it will closely monitor Jewish construction in the West Bank and protest any new housing developments in the area, a top PA negotiator told WorldNetDaily.

“They told us the White House will watch for any Jewish construction,” said the negotiator, speaking on condition of anonymity. “Obama knows that if [Likud Chairman Benjamin] Netanyahu is the next prime minister, he will try to expand the settlements. They pledged to us this will be strongly protested.”

PA officials have previously told this column that they received a guarantee from Obama’s administration that understandings reached with Israel during U.S.-backed negotiations while President Bush was in office would be utilized as starting points in future Israeli-Palestinian talks. During those negotiations, Israel reportedly agreed to evacuate about 94 percent of the West Bank.

Barghouti Release Worries Abbas

PA President Mahmoud Abbas and his Fatah organization are worried about Hamas’s demand that Israel free jailed terrorist Marwan Barghouti in a prisoner exchange that may be part of a larger truce deal with Hamas.

Barghouti, a founder of Fatah’s Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigades terrorist organization and a confessed architect of the second Intifada, has been held in Israeli prison since his conviction in 2004 on four counts of murder. He is widely respected on the Palestinian street and is said to be a major contender for heading Fatah in the future.

According to multiple sources close to the talks, Hamas has put Barghouti on the top of its list of prisoners it wants freed in exchange for the release of kidnapped Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit.

Fatah leaders are concerned their Hamas rivals will be seen as brokering the freedom of Barghouti, the sources said. If Israel releases Barghouti, Abbas and his associates want Israel to announce the release as a gesture to Fatah and not as part of a deal with Hamas. Although Fatah is Hamas’s rival, many top Hamas leaders believe they can work with Barghouti.

A top Egyptian official told this column that a major truce deal between Hamas and Israel is “very close.” The official said Israel has demanded the release of Shalit, the complete halt of terrorist attacks from Gaza for the next eighteen months, and the establishment of a buffer zone between Gaza and Israel.

Hamas for its part wants the Israel-Gaza crossings reopened and has demanded, in exchange for Shalit, the release of a large number of prisoners, including terrorists responsible for planning some of the bloodiest attacks in Israel’s history.

Syrian Spies Heading To Prison

Israel recently sentenced two Syrians living in the Jewish state to three years imprisonment for spying.

In a court in Nazareth, Yusuf Salah Sham and Atta Farhat – who were arrested July 29, 2007, weeks before Israel’s air raid on a suspected nascent Syrian nuclear reactor – were found guilty of spying for an enemy country, including providing the Syrian military with information on Israeli troop locations and military installations in the Golan Heights during the 2006 Lebanon war. Israel’s military censor forbids the disclosure of further details regarding the case.

This reporter interviewed Farhat along the Israeli-Lebanese border prior to his arrest and disclosed the details of the chat in the book Schmoozing With Terrorists.

Obama Did Not Authorize
U.S. Refuge For Palestinians

Contrary to some news media reports, President Barack Obama did not authorize Palestinian refugees to relocate to the U.S. as part of an emergency assistance package following Israel’s 22-day war against Hamas in the Gaza Strip.

On Jan. 30, Obama signed an order issuing an emergency contribution of $20.3 million for “urgent relief efforts” in Gaza. Several media outlets incorrectly reported that Obama had approved the emergency relocation of Gazans to the U.S.

Michael Hammer, a spokesperson for the National Security Council, confirmed to WND that Obama did not authorize the transfer of any Palestinians to the U.S. A State Department spokesman provided the same comment. Officials from both Hamas and the Palestinian Authority said they are not aware of any plans to bring Gazans to the U.S.

Perhaps the text of Obama’s executive caused the confusion. The order stated that the money was to be used for the “purpose of meeting unexpected and urgent refugee and migration needs.”

Aaron Klein is Jerusalem bureau chief for WorldNetDaily.com. He appears throughout the week on leading U.S. radio programs and is the author of the book “Schmoozing with Terrorists.” 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/quick-takes-news-from-israel-you-may-have-missed-167/2009/02/18/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: