web analytics
October 1, 2014 / 7 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘IDC’

IDC Fights War on Another Front

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

As Israel’s security forces remain embroiled in the ongoing conflict with Hamas along the country’s southern border, students at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya (IDC) are engaged on another equally important front: hasbara, or public diplomacy.

The Student Union at the IDC opened a “Hasbara Room” on Thursday – the first day of Operation Protective Edge – with the purpose of providing factual information about the situation on the ground to people around the world, as well as countering the misinformation and lies being disseminated on social media sites.

“Israel is not very strong at hasbara, while Hamas and the Palestinians are very good at spreading the word in the media” said volunteer coordinator Karen Yoseph, a 27-year-old MA student at the IDC. “We are trying to combat that and we are trying to expose that a lot of times Hamas is lying”.

Student Union chairman Yarden Ben-Yosef, Yoseph, and Lidor Bar David initiated the center two years ago under similar circumstances.

“During Operation Pillar of Defense we all worked at the Student Union and students were getting called up for reserve duty”, said Yoseph. “We thought, since we weren’t being called for reserve duty, why don’t we work on hasbara and help in the way that we can?”

Through the hasbara efforts during the previous round with Hamas, the IDC advocacy room was able to get their message out to an estimated 21 million people around the world. The students created a Facebook page and twitter account under the now-popular “Israel Under Fire” catchphrase, through which they conducted their hasbara efforts.

“We basically picked up where we left off [after Operation Pillar of Defense],” explained Yoseph. “We kept a list and our user account in case something happened again and this time we know how to immediately get in touch with volunteers and contacts.”

According to Yoseph, who is also responsible for managing the website, since the launch of Operation Protective Edge some 400 people have volunteered in the hasbara room and hundreds more have offered their assistance and support. Currently their operation encompasses activities in 31 languages in 62 countries and have so far garnered some 6,000 followers on Twitter and Facebook. They have also opened a dedicated website available in 13 languages with information texts, videos, pictures, and testimonials – www.israelunderfire.com.

IDC Chamal

“The IDC has a huge plus, because we have the international school with students from around the world who have offered to help and translate documents and information into their languages,” she said.

Emanuele De Benedetti, a 21-year-old undergraduate at the IDC from Rome, is one such student.

“I felt the need to work for IsraelUnderFire because growing up in Europe I saw how bad the Western news represents Israel, how partial the info given is, and I said ‘that’s not fair – especially in this day and age,’“he explained.

Every day De Benedetti dedicates his mornings to translating texts into Italian. “One of the hardest jobs I had to do was translating the Hamas constitution [into Italian], presenting how Israel really does not have a partner for the peace process,” he said.

De Benedetti says he joined the advocacy room in an effort to reach as many people as possible who remain undecided regarding the conflict and to persuade them not to take sides without understanding the situation and getting all the facts.

“Do not believe everything that you see and everything that you read,” he cautions them.

One of the challenged facing Israeli hasbara has been the constant stream of fake photos and images of dying and oppressed children – many of which are old pictures from the conflict in Syria being misrepresented by Hamas and others. Some are even pictures straight out of Hollywood films.

Tal Yaffe, an Israeli student at the IDC, explained that “the current situation forces us to fight on all fronts. Hamas doesn’t have military capabilities to harm us, but they can harm our legitimacy in the world and also harm the motivation of citizens of Israel”

According to Yaffe, who is responsible for managing the website, social media has become one of the most important tools in the war effort. “When the truth is on our side and we can show that statements or images that Hamas has put out there are false, then the truth spreads fastest on social media,” he explained.

Asked whether hasbara is making a difference, Yaffe said he believes that public opinion is more on Israel’s side than in any previous operation, while De Benedetti replied that he hadn’t been convinced, at least not until recently.

“A couple of hours ago, a friend of mine that I haven’t talked to in ages messaged me on Facebook and said he had seen my posts about Israel and asked me to explain more to him, so I sent him posts from IsraelUnderFire,” he recounted. “Those that are pro-Palestinian – you are not going to convince them because they start from the assumption that their position is right, period; but the people who are undecided, we can try to reach as many as possible.”

Yoseph concurred, stating, “We should try to get the facts out and even if we reach only a few people then that makes all the difference.”

To learn more, click here.

Earn an MA in Homeland Security, Counter-Terrorism, Diplomacy and Government

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

Besides swiftly becoming one of Israel’s leading academic institutions, the Inter-Disciplinary Center in Herzliya has also become a beacon thanks to the iconic annual Herzliya Conference – organized by the Institute for Policy and Strategy (IPS), and the IDC’s International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) – a joint forum that organizes seminars, workshops and forums for policy makers from all over the world. Alongside its program in Political Psychology and Decision Making (POPDM) and the workshop series on “Improving Public Policy in Israel” – these represent the core within the IDC’s prestigious MA Program in Government. This is where the next generation of Israeli and global leaders, scholars and educators are being educated.

Students at the program study with leading lecturers in the field and gain an all-encompassing introduction to the State of Israel. Theofani Tzakiri from Greece is a Merit Scholarship student. In addition to learning key theories, models, and concepts in government, she receives the analytical and practical tools needed to conduct policy-relevant research and deal with policy dilemmas, challenges and problems. “Studying at IDC is a lifetime experience,” she says. “The cultural and social student mix creates a beautiful and fascinating background that needs to be experienced; and the warm and welcoming environment provides a home where I can study and work peacefully to acquire the knowledge and skills I need to focus on issues of international concern.”

Many of IDC’s graduates have found positions at the UN, in Israeli government offices, international security consultancies and NGOs, or have continued to prestigious PhD programs abroad. Students network with leaders, policymakers and colleagues from dozens of countries around the world. They meet with heads of state, foreign ministers, negotiators, journalists, and others. And they even go on field trips to peace-keeping forces in the region (UNDOF, UNIFIL), and visit NATO headquarters in Brussels. The IDC’s prize-winning debate club, college-associated public advocacy groups and the development of entrepreneurial skills are amongst the many extracurricular activities that nurture leadership.

Eric Schorr

Eric Schorr


Eric Schorr was a member of the 2013 IDC Hult Prize team that participated in the Semi-Final Competition in London; he is currently working at the Institute of Terrorism Research and Response in Jerusalem. “I’ve been passionate about counter-terrorism for most of my adult life,” he says. What I loved most at IDC was how the professors, research, and projects we did highlighted aspects of the subject I had never thought about before. It’s a truly unique program in terms of graduate studies.”

When IDC’s founders established Israel’s first private university, their goal was to create an institution where personal achievement is fostered alongside social responsibility, and where academics are studied alongside practical, hands-on training and experience. Thus, IDC’s involvement with the community, as well as its interaction with the myriad of enterprises located in the nearby Herzliya Industrial zone have become a model now emulated in many other institutions.

Ayal Feinberg

Ayal Feinberg


Diplomacy MA student, Ayal Feinberg – a Trinity College graduate, believes that “the single greatest feature of IDC-Herzliya is its people. The classroom environment, created by a combination of remarkable faculty and eager students, allows for unparalleled intellectual growth. Whether pursuing a degree with the goal of becoming a practitioner or continuing on to academia, you will leave IDC with all the tools necessary to be a success.”

For more information, visit the IDC-Herzliya website.

 

 

IDC’s Combined Degree in Law and Business

Monday, October 21st, 2013

The world is not only getting smaller – it’s getting hungrier, too!

With international commerce getting more competitive, resources dwindling, banks defaulting and world terror a constant threat, nations often find themselves competing in the board room or before a magistrate rather than in the battlefield – led by lawyers rather than generals. Thus, today’s business lawyer must be an expert in international trade and regulations, and a business major must be able to perform in a globalized economy – notwithstanding language and local predilections.

Prof. Sharon Rabin-Margalioth, Dean of the Radzyner School of Law at IDC Herzliya has studied law on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. “In business, local expertise is insufficient; there is a growing need for international business law expertise and the ability to cope with the challenges of globalization. That’s why we’ve established an innovative new program that provides students with significant added value in law and business.”

IDC’s combined degree in Law & Business Administration program focuses on global legal principles. Taught in English, students acquire an in-depth knowledge of international business law and the tools required to integrate into the international legal world and the global business sphere.

US Supreme Court Justice Brandeis once observed that a lawyer who is not proficient in economic theory poses a danger to the public. Today, that assertion would state that one cannot function in a global sphere without an interdisciplinary understanding of geopolitical processes and the realities of any region in which we desire to act.

In law, as in commerce one must draw upon experience and extensive knowledge to solve any problem at hand. One must interpret and utilize social norms and translate these into legal and commercial dispositions. The Radzyner School of Law provides students with that knowledge base and the ability to analyze problems and place them into an appropriate context – an impressive challenge, given the intricate nature of language and human disposition.

Students develop their analytical skills, a creative imagination, a sensitivity for others, and the ability to express themselves in any situation. They also engage in diverse practical experiences, acquire 21st century skills and directly interact with leading figures in the legal practice and academic world from both Israel and abroad. The nine semester curriculum (four years and an additional summer semester) includes law, business and specialized courses integrating the two.

The program is offered by the IDC’s Raphael Recanati International School.

Jonathan Davis who is both Vice-President for External Relations and head of the RRIS is a firm believer in the IDC’s mission of statement: “We are Zionists – here to contribute to Israel and to the Jewish People,” he stresses.” We strive to build bridges between the elites and the underprivileged, between Israelis and the Diaspora, between Israel and its neighbors.”

And, indeed, one of the main goals of the combined degree in International Business Law and Business Administration is to create a truly international learning experience. Students from 86 different countries make up more than a quarter of the student body; and the IDC’s internationally renowned faculty roster reflects both scholarly excellence and practical experience.

“We are constantly expanding the school’s international focus and developing new and exciting opportunities for our students to explore on a global level,” Davis adds.

The Radzyner School of Law is also one of the founding members of the Law Schools Global League – an international alliance between more than twenty law schools, which fosters collaborative relations and offers students the opportunity to study abroad for one semester as part of an extensive student exchange program.

IDC is located in Herzliya, a city six miles north of Tel Aviv along the Mediterranean’s white sandy beach. Besides a host of recreational facilities, the area has been nicknamed Silicon Wadi – attracting the world’s leading venture-capital firms alongside Israeli software and biotech companies, many of them traded on international stock exchanges. When established in 1994, IDC was the first major private educational institution in Israel. Today, with 25 research centers and more than 60 exchange programs with leading universities around the world, IDC employs a truly international and distinctly interdisciplinary approach, allowing students to obtain an education that is comprehensive on so many levels and practical.

BOI Governor Might be Named after Yom Kippur

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Following the fiascoes where Netanyahu’s preferred choices for Bank of Israel governors were disqualified or pulled out, after outside forces put pressure on them and exposed some old histories, the Turkel Committee vetted and approved three new candidates for the job, according to Globes.

Retired judge, Yaakov Turkel, called Prime Minister Netanyahu on Wednesday, and informed him that there were no moral or ethical impediments for any of the three current candidates to get the job. The committee reviewed many complaints against all three, by their various critics and detractors.

Netanyahu is expected to announce his choice, either right before, or right after Yom Kippur.

Netanyahu’s preferred candidate is Professor Mario Blejer. He is a former Governor of the Argentine Central Bank. Blejer has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, a school which Netanyahu highly admires.

Candidate number two is Professor Zvi Eckstein, the Dean of the Faculty of Economics at the Herzliya Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) and a former Deputy Governor of the Bank of Israel under former Bank of Israeli governor Stanley Fischer. Fischer did not back Eckstein’s candidacy.

Candidate number three is Victor Medina. He was also a Deputy Governor of the Bank of Israel.

IDC Students Show Microsoft How to Do It Right

Sunday, August 4th, 2013

The setting was the annual student Design Expo at the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit, which is one reason the project called “Clashers” stood out: It’s an Android app, developed by students from Israel’s Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, that leverages YouTube to let people eavesdrop on songs being played by other Clashers users they spot on the street, the bus or anywhere else.

After their presentation yesterday at the Redmond event, a member of the panel pointed out that Microsoft itself had tried this type of thing — with proximity-based song sharing on its ill-fated Zune music player —with decidedly underwhelming results.

But the IDC students believe they have come up with a better approach. When a user clicks on the picture and name of the other Clashers user, the app pulls up a YouTube music video and starts playing at the same point in the song, for a shared music experience. The person who has been “Clashed” gets a notification that someone else is listening in.

Apart from its use of non-Microsoft technologies in a Microsoft design showcase, the app stands out because it’s actually available now in the Google Play Store. As the video above shows, it’s a potential nirvana for teens and twenty-something singles.

The students say the project was inspired not by Zune but by the popular “What Song Are You Listening To?” videos on YouTube.

What about privacy? Clashers only works if the other person is willingly using the app, and only shows the user’s name and picture, but the app highlights what can be a relatively relaxed attitude toward privacy among younger generations.

The Microsoft Research Design Expo, now in its 10th year, was started by Microsoft researcher Lili Cheng. It’s part of Microsoft’s broader attempt to include student design teams from around the world — not just computer science students — in the process of developing and imagining technology. The overall theme this year was “making data useful.”

Every school involved in the Design Expo runs a semester-long class each year, with help from Microsoft. Student projects compete at each school to present their work at the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit, although the expo itself isn’t a contest. Past participants have included Dennis Crowley, the Foursquare founder, who was a graduate student at NYU.

On the other end of the privacy spectrum from Clashers, a Design Expo project called “Mine,” from students at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, gives people a glimpse of what data miners know about them from their public feeds, allowing them to make adjustments as necessary to shape the way they’re viewed by potential employers and others.

The involvement of international schools can often lead to new insights for U.S.-based researchers. As an example, Cheng pointed to this year’s PoliCiti project by students from the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, India, which gives citizens new ways to report crime, track police progress and even see geographic clusters of bribery and police corruption through a mobile app. Another project, from UCLA grad student Refik Anadol, will project a real-time light show onto the interior and exterior of L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall next year — using real-time data from the live music and tracking the motion of L.A. Philharmonic conductor Gustavo Dudamel. Anadol gave a brief demo of the technology in a Microsoft conference hall yesterday, and it was impressive even at a smaller scale.

And a project called Greenery, from students at the Universidad Iberoamericana, Design Department, creates a virtual laboratory to help urban dwellers grow their own food in real time.

Check out Israel’s Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya.

IDC Herzliya – An Innovative Approach to Success

Sunday, July 1st, 2012

Spreading knowledge – serving society (Magna Charta Universitatum)

Too many academic institutions over the past nine hundred years needed reminding by the rectors gathering in Bologna in 1988 that universities were created for students. Established six years later, the Herzliya Interdisciplinary Center was not going to make that mistake. Constructed on the basis of students-as-partners in their own education, there is no other academic institution in Israel where faculty and staff support have earned this university top marks in student satisfaction. Supporting and nurturing students is the first priority of all university employees – whether academic or administrative; there is no faculty club – faculty, staff and students dine together; and in particularly stark contrast to other organizations (not only academic) there isn’t even special parking for senior university personnel.

But make no mistake – behind this interdisciplinary democratic portico lies one of the country’s most serious academic establishments. With faculty members who hail from other Ivy League campuses and graduate students who are sought after by those same institutions – and by most of the world’s finest global corporations – IDC has been making its mark worldwide. Graduates continue towards doctorate and master’s degrees at Cambridge, Oxford and LSE, in the UK, and at Harvard, Columbia, Cornell, George Washington, Georgetown, MIT, NYU, Pennsylvania, Stanford, Berkley and more in the US. They can be found at the University of Toronto and Tufts, Emory, St. Louis and Sciences Po in Paris. They are employed by Amdocs, Checkpoint, Elbit, GE, IBM, ICA Telecom, Legend Business, Medcon, Microsoft and major banks worldwide. Important investment funds and startups seek them; government ministries and institutions covet them.

In short, over less than two decades, IDC Herzliya’s graduates have been forming a vast network of alumni throughout the world that is leaving other, much older and better established universities green with envy.

 

Multi-discipline is a function of multi-culturalism

With students from over 84 different countries, IDC is certainly Israel’s most international university. The institution even has special ‘bureaucracy busters’ to help students get through red tape mazes, wherever they still exist. But multi-culturalism is not merely having students from different places; it is also bringing together people who would otherwise never have met. IDC’s Israel at Heart Program, boasts one of the highest per capita number of Ethiopian students in the country; we have a higher percentage of former IDF officers and elite unit reservists than any other university in Israel; and, with a wide range of scholarships – from Massa, the Ministry of Absorption, the Jewish Agency, Jewish Federations, NGOs, FAFSA Loans, the IDC’s own scholarship foundation and governmental assistance – IDC’s relatively high tuition fees are never an obstacle to students from socio-economic sectors that might otherwise have to forego a top-quality university education.

When founder and current president, Uriel Reichman formulated IDC’s mission statement, he based it on the Zionist ideal of contributing to the State of Israel and the Jewish People. No mere idealistic dreamer, Reichman realized from the start that excellence cannot be created in a vacuum. The greatest motivation to succeed cannot be limited to inward-looking individualism, but must also be based in a consciousness of the world around – its needs and its rich offerings. On one hand, this means that IDC boasts dozens of volunteer social service programs, which continuously make inroads into the social environment. Run by students and faculties together,  these programs serve to remind everyone of their accountability towards those who need our help, generosity and assistance. On the other hand, social involvement also serves to emphasize the concept of ‘freedom and responsibility’, teaching students to cherish freedoms, liberalism, democracy and the free enterprise spirit that will become a primary component in their future success.

 

A curriculum for success

Studies at IDC Herzliya focus on providing students with all the tools required to thrive in today’s swiftly changing business environment. Whether it’s an MBA, a degree in Organizational Behavior or any one of the varied study trends offered, the curriculum always combines a unique blend of academic material and practical experience. Adjacent to the heartland of Israel’s Sharon region hi-tech industrial zone, students can study and work with the very individuals who put the Miracle Start-Up Nation on the global map. Entrepreneurs and researchers offer courses and work-study programs; and the school encourages students to initiate, innovate, invent and create. As a result, they enter the workforce with both a very valuable degree and the experience necessary to hit the ground running.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/uncategorized/idc-herzliya-an-innovative-approach-to-success/2012/07/01/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: