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April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Judaic Studies’

West Coast Happenings

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

Events In The West: Rabbi Israel Meir Lau, former chief rabbi of Israel and currently chief rabbi of Tel Aviv, will visit Seattle from June 21-23. He will be speaking on the evening of Thursday, June 21 at Bikur Cholim Machzikay Hadath (BCMH) on “From the Shoah to the Rebirth of the Jewish People.” On Shabbos, June 23 at Ezra Bessaroth, Rabbi Lau will speak about one’s belief after the Holocaust and on “What Makes the Jewish People One Nation” during a community lunch. Rabbi Lau will also speak at BCMH before Minchah on “In Praise of Peace and Condemnation of Conflict.”

Yeshiva News: Two new Los Angeles-area yeshivas are opening in the fall. In Valley Village the Yeshiva Ketana of Los Angeles, a preschool, will be under the direction of Rabbi Aharon Rubenstein (menahel) and Mrs. Aida Forman (director), M.Ed…. In the Pico Robertson area, Rabbi Moshe Benzaquen will be the director of Judaic Studies at Yeshiva High Tech, a new yeshiva high school with separate classes for boys and girls. Rebecca Coen will be head of school. The tuition is set at $ 8,500.

Kosher News: Kosher food is available at Dodger Stadium at the Club Market Place on the club level behind home plate. Sandwiches are certified by the RCC.

LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA

Mazel Tov – Birth: Ari and Marnie Guinsberg of South Africa, a daughter (Grandparents Steve and Jan Kruschen).

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Mazel Tov – Births: Mordechai and Chavy Shlomowitz, a son… Alti and Dini Burston, a daughter… Akiva and Rachel Greenfield, a daughter (Grandparents Gerard and Marlene Einhorn)… Danny and Joelle Manz of Zurich, Switzerland, a son (Grandparents Icho and Evi Chmiel)… Seth and Alana Isenberg of Silver Spring, MD, a son (Grandparents Dr. Sherwin and Rina Isenberg… Ronnie and Chava Bernstein, a son (Grandparents Saul and Linda Bernstein)… Rabbi Daniel and Tally Weinstock, a son (Grandparents Zvika and Leah Brenner)… Rabbi Meir and Reva Bess of Lakewood, a son (Grandparents Rabbi Gershon and Carol Bess)… Asher and Dahlia Hoffman, a son (Grandparents Dr. Ernie and Susie Agatstein)… Rabbi Yitz and Aviva Novak, a daughter (Grandparents David and Isabelle Novak)… Daniel and Annie Nagel, a daughter (Grandparents Ronnie and Cheryl Nagel; Great- grandparents Jack and Gitta Nagel).

Mazel Tov – Engagements: Efrat Okrent, daughter of Dr. Derek and Batsheva Okrent, to Brian Henick of NJ… Mickey Amster, son of Rabbi Moshe and Natalie Amster, to Shana Cutler of Tucson, AZ… Benji Markoff, son of Brad and Mia Markoff, to Rebecca Zagha of Teaneck, NJ… Dave Shainberg, son of Moshe and Celia Shainberg, to Maytal Fligelman of NY… Orr Goldvarg to Golda Akivaeva.

Mazel Tov – Wedding: Jack Gindi to Sheila Feigelstock of North Hollywood, CA.

Graduations: Albert Einstein School of Medicine – Rabbi Dr. Raphy Hulkower… Columbia University – Gila Muskin Block, M.A.… Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology – Lisa Guzik Blum, M.A.… Parsons School of Design – Danielle Frankel… Stern College – Jennifer Friedman, Sara Kellerman, Dina Muskin, Robin Pollack, and Lauren Weiss… Southwestern Law School – Arie Gres, J.D.… UCLA Anderson School of Management – Adam Lewis, M.B.A.… UCLA Law School – Annie Nagel… University of Chicago School of Law – Aaron Katz… Wurzweiler School of Social Work – Geoffrey Mellon, M.S.W.… Yeshiva University – Jesse Katz and Yitzchak Kempe… Yeshiva University Bernard Revel Graduate School – David Block, M.A.

Tzeschem L’Shalom: To Newport, RI – Rabbi Marc and Jackie Mandel.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

Graduations: Cal State Eastbay – Isadora Betancourt, M.S.… George Washington University – Sam Ackerman, M.S.… Harvard University – Alex Ramek, M.S.… Mt. Holyoke College – Hilary Katz, B.A.… Smith College – Zohara Levine, B.A.… Stanford University – Zachary Buchman, B.A.… Touro University – Rebecca Astrachan, M.S.

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

Mazel Tov – Bar Mitzvah: Matan Moyal, son of Uri and Lior Moyal.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Mazel Tov – Birth: Dr. Bryce and Dena Mendelsohn, a daughter… Adam and Gabi Tabak, a son (Grandparents Tommy and Jeannie Tabak).

VALLEY VILLAGE, CALIFORNIA

Mazel Tov – Births: Akiva and Rachel Greenfield, a daughter (Grandparents Bruce and Anne Greenfield)… Nashie and Chelsea, a son (Grandparents Rabbi Asher and Michal Rosenberg; Great-grandparents Gabe and Eva Rosenberg; Great-great-grandmother Irene Rosenberg)… Tomi and Sara Rosenthal, a son (Grandparents Ted and Shelly Sarles)… Yehuda and Raquellel Pfeifer of Monsey, NY, a daughter (Grandparents Israel and Dr. Phyllis Hirsch).

Circle Of Friends: A Group For The Single Woman

Wednesday, July 15th, 2009

 



            When you lose your spouse, whether s/he was sick or healthy, whether it’s through divorce or death, the transition period into the next part of your life is a difficult one. Many new singles find that they no longer fit into their old friendships. They are no longer part of a couple, so associating with couples can be uncomfortable. Often watching a couple’s interaction, when you are no longer part of one, can cause feelings of sadness and loss. It can leave you longing for the life you no longer have. For well spouses it can leave you longing for the fantasy that you didn’t have and now know will never happen. Many new singles, particularly women, find that their former friends are no longer as available as they once were. Some women who are married begin to see their former, now single friends as almost a threat. Invitations to gatherings or even a movie or lecture become less forthcoming. And suddenly, a new companion called loneliness begins to stalk the newly single woman.

 

 Finding new friends is not easy. You are older and all those places where you met women of a similar age and common interests that enabled you to make friendships easily no longer exist. You have long ago stopped walking your children to school or taking them to after-school activities. You might even be a grandparent. Where do grandparents go to meet new friends?

 

  I recently discovered an interesting group of women. They are all single women over 50 years of age. Some are divorced, some were never married, and some are widows.  These women belong to a group called Circle of Friends. The group meets in the Cummings Jewish Centre for Seniors in Montreal, Quebec (where “senior” means 50 years of age or older). The group meets twice a month in the evenings, as many of the members are still working. They have lectures and interactive programs. Many of the women did not know each other before they joined the group. Some were depressed from a recent loss of a spouse when they became a member. Many were lonely. They came here to participate in interesting activities and hopefully make new friends. During the interactive programs, the women have a chance to get to know one another and develop friendships. Recently, they decided to form interest groups. Now any member can join other members for, among other activities, walking groups, Mahjongg, movies, theatre, bowling and Judaic Studies. These interest groups are smaller and give the ladies a chance to meet fellow members with whom they share a common interest. To date, the membership is over ninety women. Everyone has a membership phone list where people have noted things they enjoy doing. Feel like going to the ballet and want company? Check your Circle of Friends list and see who else enjoys the ballet and give her a call. More often than not, you both have a lovely evening, and a friendship has begun.

 

The Cummings Centre houses the group and provides support. The group itself is self-run by its members who decide what direction they wish to go in. There is a volunteer office where anyone can come to give their time or suggest an idea to try out. I spoke with one of the members of this year’s steering community, Sheila Esar. She shared with me how she and so many others have made new friends from the group.  She noted how many members, including her, joined the group while trying to adjust to their new lives alone. Most were naturally depressed and lonely. Their confidence diminished by what they had been through. She noted how satisfying it was for her to see so many members come out of their shells, regain their confidence and begin to live again. One member told me how she heard of the group and came to see what it was about. She was naturally anxious about coming since she knew no one. To her surprise, people were immediately friendly. In less than a week, two of the members called to invite her for lunch. Now she is in charge of one of the interest groups and hates to miss a single meeting. Because they know how it feels to be alone, the women make it a point to greet and spend time with any new member who comes into the group. And that attitude helps make for the warm atmosphere you feel as soon as you enter a meeting of Circle of Friends.

 

 There is room for every single woman here, no matter her situation or interest. One member of the steering committee said that she felt well spouses with husbands in care facilities would be welcome as well, since in actuality their lives are really that of a single even though they are still married.

 

            I thought the concept of the group wonderful and wanted to suggest that every community center, senior center and any place that provides support for large groups might think of establishing something similar. But the key to what makes this group really work is the commitment to warmth and inclusion that permeates the group and encompasses anyone who walks in the door.  With that kind of commitment, no group like this will fail.

 

 You can contact me at annnovick@hotmail.com

Judaic Studies class, Brooklyn College

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2007

Question: Some critics feel the Holocaust has come to define Jewish identity in America and that it takes away from other aspects of Jewish life and culture. Agree?

 

 


No. The Holocaust represents just one of the many struggles we as a nation have faced. It’s good that we devote much time to commemorating the Holocaust – it shows the power of religion and faith, and it doesn’t take away from other aspects of Jewish culture.


- Janet Salem, student

 

 

 





Yes. People do tend to link Jewish identity with the Holocaust, but this is not a negative. Clearly, the message of the Holocaust hasn’t penetrated, since genocide is still with us – we say “Never Again,” but we see that other people are facing extermination. The Holocaust needs to be a part of our Jewish identity – there is nothing wrong with that.


- Joseph Setto, student

 

 



No. I feel not enough attention is paid to the Holocaust. Commemorating the Holocaust shouldn’t be done just once a year. The Holocaust didn’t happen such a long time ago and we are already forgetting about it. The generation that went through it is dwindling, and what will future generations know about it? I don’t think the Holocaust has become the central Jewish experience; the exodus from Egypt and the founding of the state of Israel, to mention just two examples, are at least as important to Jewish identity as the Holocaust.


- Faigy Stein, student

 

 

 






No. The Holocaust may be associated with Jewish identity, but it doesn’t define us as a people. We need to introduce the history of the Holocaust from an early age while we still have survivors who are alive and can share their memories with us. We also need to learn from the Holocaust in order to be more sensitive to other acts of genocide.


- Aviva Weiss, student



Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/judaic-studies-class-brooklyn-college/2007/05/02/

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