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December 19, 2014 / 27 Kislev, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘Kinneret’

Despite Calls to End Peace, Israel Increases Water Flow to Jordan

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Here’s some good news to those of you who’ve been following the vote in the Jordanian parliament on Wednesday, to demand that King Abdullah expel the Israeli envoy scrap the peace treaty with Israel.

That treaty, signed back in 1994 on the White House lawn, by his Majesty, the late King Hussein of Jordan and Israeli Prime Minister, the late Yitzhak Rabin, with U.S. President Bill Clinton watching – that treaty regulates the use of regional water by both countries. It’s all in Article 6 of the treaty, which is bigger than all the rest of the 30 articles put together.

The reason is simple: much of the water—just about all of it, really—alongside the border between the two countries happens to be in Israeli territory. Without that water, Jordan goes back to being the proud desert country it’s always been, which is fine if you’re Bedouin, but not so great if you’re a farmer.

Here’s what can happen, should Jordan decide to scrap its peace treaty with Israel: it would have to do without the following items:

Israel accepted responsibility for operating, supplying and maintaining systems on Israeli territory that supply Jordan with water.

In the summer, May 15 to October 15 of each year, Israel agreed to transfer 20 million cubic meters from the Jordan River directly upstream from Deganya gates.

In the winter, October 16 to May 14 of each year, Jordan is entitled to a minimum average of 20 million cubic meters of the floods in the Jordan River south of the Yarmouk. Unusable excess floods that would otherwise be unused, including pumped storage, can also be taken by Jordan.

In addition, Israel agreed to share the Yarmouk River with Jordan. Anything above 12 million cubic meters in the summer and 13 million in winter goes to Jordan.

When you hear about the Kinneret water going below all kinds of red lines? It’s because they’re being diverted north of the lake, at a rate of up to 50 million cubic meters a year.

OK, that was the deal, we wanted a peace treaty and that’s what we had to pay for it. The fact is that Israel’s relations with Jordan are a whole lot warmer than with Egypt—until the Arab Spring thing hits Amman, of course.

But now the Jordanian parliament—which is largely Palestinian, incidentally—has reacted to the fact that Israel, in an unprecedented display of courage, decided to detain the Jerusalem Mufti for his blatant preaching of violence against the Jews. If the Israelis don’t let our holy guy preach murder, we’re scrapping the treaty.

The treaty that’s the life blood of Jordan’s economy—in addition to supplying Jordan with much of its water, much of Jordan’s industry is owned by Israeli tycoons, who relocated factories from Israel, where organized Jewish workers used to burden them with demands for benefits and realistic wages—to Jordan, where a working man gets a pitta and a couple of onions which he shares with his family of 15.

Now, what did Israel just do, following the Jordanian parliament’s threat to call it quits?

Amb. Oded Eran

Amb. Oded Eran

Oded Eran, Israel’s ambassador to Jordan, was interviewed on Reshet Bet Thursday morning, and he said that Israel has increased the amount of water it diverts to the Hashamite kingdom, in order to accommodate the numerous refugees flooding Jordan from Syria.

Talk about doing the decent Christian thing…

Or treasonous. Potato-potato.

Ambassador Eran also said Israel also allows Jordan to export its goods to the West through the port of Haifa.

The benefits of peace.

So the host, Ya’akov Achi-Meir, asked him how that sits with the recommendation of the Jordanian parliament to kick him out of the country, and the ambassador answered that once the peace process with the Palestinians is on its way, things in Jordan would calm down.

According to Ambassador Eran, the Jordanian government is on very friendly terms with Israel, it’s only the vast population that wants all of us dead.

Now, here’s the zinger: according to Reshet Bet, Israeli sources have said that Israel has increased the amount of water it transfers to Jordan and the Palestinian Authority recently regardless of the increase in the number of refugees from Syria in Jordan.

Ancient Monument Underwater in the Kinneret

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Israel Antiquity Authority researchers revealed on Thursday the existence of a mysterious rock pile, 30 ft. tall and more than 200 ft. in diameter, comprised of “unhewn basalt cobbles and boulders” weighing an estimated 60 thousand tons, according to the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology.

Archeologist Yitzhak Paz said that the structure could be 4000 years old, similar to ancient structures that have been found nearby.

We assume that 6–9 ft. of sand that covers the base of the cairn accumulated naturally after its construction. The sediment accumulation rates in lakes vary in space and time. The location of the structure is not associated with any stream which could supply sediment. Therefore, long-shore currents and suspended particulate matter are the plausible sources. An interesting observation from the Ohalo II site is the deposition of 20 cm of sand within a single winter on top of plastic sheets that were placed to cover the excavations. We believe that this event does not represent the long-term deposition rate. Assuming an accumulation rate of 1–4 mm/yr, construction may have taken place between two and 12 millennia ago.

Location maps: a) The Sea of Galilee is a fault-bounded basin (faults shown with solid white lines). The River Jordan (J, dotted line), the main water supplier to the lake, enters at the north and exits southward. Shaded topography from Hall (1994). (Shmuel Marco); b) The lake bathymetric map based on multi beam survey (after Sade et al., 2008) with the location of the monumental structure (red). (Shmuel Marco)

Location maps: a) The Sea of Galilee is a fault-bounded basin (faults shown with solid white lines). The River Jordan (J, dotted line), the main water supplier to the lake, enters at the north and exits southward. Shaded topography from Hall (1994). (Shmuel Marco); b) The lake bathymetric map based on multi beam survey (after Sade et al., 2008) with the location of the monumental structure (red). (Shmuel Marco)

The researchers said that the shape and composition of the underwater structure does not appear to be a natural formation, concluding that it is man-made, possibly an ancient cairn – a man-made stack of stones. Its age and purpose are not known.

A schematic section with approximate proportions of the structure. (Shmuel Marco)

Schematic section w. approximate proportions of the structure. (Shmuel Marco)

Two speculations so far have been that it was either built under water to attract fish, or built on dry land, and then covered by the rising sea water.

The structure was first spotted in a 2003 sonar scan of the Kinneret. The structure is comprised of large boulders, each around 3 ft. long, without a discernable construction pattern.

The researchers wrote in their paper that effort invested in such an enterprise is indicative of a complex, well-organized society, with planning skills and economic ability.

The researchers point out that the Kinneret discovery is just north of the site of the ancient city Beit Yerach (house of the moon god):

The possible relation of the submerged stone structure to the ancient settlements along the shores of the Sea of Galilee is of great importance. Flourishing settlement systems existed along the shores in the Bronze and Iron Ages, between the 4th and the 1st millennia BCE. Urban centers such as Bet Yerach, Tel Hadar and Bethsaida were the prominent settlements in Biblical periods

Beit-Yerach was one of the most remarkable Bronze age sites in Israel. Its large size (80 acres), massive brick walls (24 ft. wide), natural protection (surrounded by water), and strategic location (cross roads passing the southern side of the Kinneret), made it one of the strongest cities 4 thousand years ago.

The Kinneret Continues to Rise

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Just since Monday, the Kinneret rose another 2 centimeters to 210.445 meters below sea level, and is now standing at 255 centimeters above the lower red line.

In the past 6 days the Kinneret has risen 11 centimeters.

Kinneret Up, Jerusalem and Environs Snowed In (Photos)

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

The Kinneret rose another 14 centimeters in the past 24 hours, and 70 centimeters over the past 6 days. It’s expected to go up another 10 centimeters over the next few days.

Currently the Kinneret is 211.20 meters below sea level, and at it’s highest level since 2007.

Meanwhile, Thursday’s snowstorm is being touted as the worst (or best) snowstorm Jerusalem has seen in 20 years, with approximately 6 inches of snow sticking on the ground, while in Hebron, the snow reached more than a foot high.

 

 

 

 

 

The Kinneret is Rising

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

In the past 24 hours, the Kinneret rose 22 centimeters. At it’s last measurement, it was at 211.50 meters below sea level. With the rainstorm currently hitting Israel, the Kinneret is expected to rise even higher.

And the Rain, Rain, Rain, Came Down, Down, Down…

Monday, January 7th, 2013

The rainstorms that began over the weekend in Israel have only intensified, with strong winds of up to 100 kilometers per hour in Jerusalem, overflowing rivers in Tel Aviv, overturned parked mopeds in Efrat, closed roads around the country, and snow on parts of the Hermon mountain.

Jerusalemites are eagerly anticipating the possibility of snow on Tuesday or Wednesday.

The Herzliya train station is closed due to flooding, and on Sunday, seven people had to be rescued from a trapped elevator in the station.

And Baruch Hashem, the Kinneret is only going up.

The Kinneret Continues to Rise

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012

Over the past few days the Kinneret has been steadily rising, and on Saturday it rose by 12 centimeters reaching 212.07 meters below sea level, which is 93 centimeters above the lower red line.

The Kinneret is now 327 centimeters below its maximum capacity which is at 208.8 meters below sea level.

The Kinneret’s highest level in 2012 was 211.30 centimeters below sea level.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/the-kinneret-continues-to-rise/2012/12/22/

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