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August 22, 2014 / 26 Av, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Kiryat Gat’

Intel’s Multi-Billion Dollar Upgrade to Kiryat Gat Plant

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

The Intel Corporation has announced a multi-billion dollar upgrade to its plant in Kiryat Gat.

The investment plan, worth approximately $5-6 billion, includes a deal between the company and the state that includes a government grant to the firm of some NIS 750 million ($216,706,500).

The grant comes in return for a commitment to invest five percent of the funds into the Israeli economy, according to an announcement by an Intel statement.

“This investment plan is the result of the process we’ve been working on for several years,” commented Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu.

“Israel is the focus of global technology and the investment generates profits, both for investors and for the citizens of the State of Israel. I call on other international companies to increase their investment in Israel, and those who have not yet taken advantage of the benefits offered by the Israeli economy to come and invest here,” he said.

Economics Minister Naftali Bennett, chairman of the Bayit Yehudi party, called the announcement “the best gift we could ask for, for Israel’s 66th Independence Day.”

Grad Hits Ashkelon School

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Reports indicate that a Grad rocket has hit a children’s school in Ashkelon.  No injuries were reported.

The population of Ashkelon is estimated around 110,000 people.

The 122 mm Grad rockets used in Gaza have a range of about 25 miles, and can reach the cities of Ashdod, Beer-Sheva, Ashkelon, Gedera, Rehovot, Ofakim, Kiryat Gat, Sderot, Kiryat Malachi and Gan Yavne.  Most of the rockets are made in Iran, but some are made in China.  They are believed to be smuggled in through Egypt.

5 Minute Rocket Update: 3 Dead, Multiple Cities Hit

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

9:08 AM 2 women, 1 man killed in Kiryat Melachi strike. Baby moderately wounded. Dozens being treated for shell shock.

9:05 AM In the past 5 minutes, 4 barrages of rocket attacks on Ashdod.

House in  Kiryat Gat hit. No injuries reported.

IDF expresses concern that as the day goes by, rocket attacks will intensify.

3 Confirmed dead in Kiryat Melachi. Missiles still falling.

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

8:52 AM There are 3 confirmed dead in the rocket strike in Kiryat Melachi, and a baby is injured, in moderate condition.

The rocket hit the 4th story of an apartment building.

IDF reporter is under rocket fire in Kiryat Melchi, as she is reporting live from the scene

 

Rockets falling in Kiryat Melachi and Kiryat Gat.

A Different Kind Of Camp: An Interview with Yeshiva University’s Rabbi Kenneth Brander

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future seems to expand with each passing year.

Founded in 2005, the Center – among other activities – now educates hundreds of ordained rabbis through its Rabbinic Training Placement and Continuing Education program; sends 1,000 students every year to help communities around the world through its Experiential Education and Service Learning program; makes 60,000 shiurim of YU rabbis and others available online through YUTorah.org; helps YU students and alumni find their Intended through YUConnects.org; and sets up kollelim around the country through its Community Initiatives program.

This summer, the Center ran day camps in five Israeli development towns: Dimona, Arad, Kiryat Gat, Kiryat Malachi, and Beersheba. Staffed by 60 YU students, the camps serviced over 350 Israeli children.

The Jewish Press recently spoke with Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the Center’s dean, about the summer camps.

The Jewish Press: What was the logic behind Yeshiva University students from America organizing summer camps in Israel?

Rabbi Brander: One of the things that attracted the campers to our programs – each one was sold out and there were waiting lists – was the fact that you had American students coming over to Israel. It was cool that they were American.

Some of these kids have lived very challenging lives; they come from poor homes, foster homes, one-parent homes, etc. I’ll give you an example. We took the campers from Kiryat Gat and Kiryat Malachi to the airport to welcome in a Nefesh B’Nefesh flight; most of them had never been to an airport before.

Is the poverty really that bad in these cities?

There’s a significant divide between the wealth in the center of Israel and the south of Israel. The south is a very, very poor area. In a place like Dimona, two out of every three children are beneath the poverty line, which is significantly lower than the American poverty line.

One day, one of the kids from Dimona took a donkey to travel to camp. That’s what we’re talking about.

What’s the purpose of these camps?

They’re English-immersive summer camps. So, for example, we’ll take mishnayos and translate them into English.

Our other thing is that we want to build the campers’ self-esteem because they have very poor self-esteem. They’ve been told by everybody that they can’t accomplish – that for the rest of their lives they’re going to live in this cycle of poverty. But then, all of a sudden, they see – through arts and crafts, martial arts, dance, etc. – that they actually have skills and talents.

Are all the campers in the “poor self-esteem” or “troubled homes” categories?

They all come from challenging situations – some of the cities more than others. The population in Arad is nowhere near as financially challenged as the populations in the other camps. I would not put Arad and Dimona in the same category as Kiryat Gat, Kiryat Malachi and Beersheba.

In the latter cities, we only worked with kids who were basically on the cusp of failing out of school, who are classified by their schools as being in the “Nachshon group.” In Dimona and Arad, though, we had a mixture of all different kinds of kids.

Were these campers mostly Sephardim? Ashkenazim? Russian? Ethiopian?

It’s a klal Yisrael program. You have everyone. Development towns such as the ones we were in have a lot more Ethiopians and Russians than maybe other towns, but it’s a mixture….

You’ll also have kids who wear kippot along with kids who don’t. But I have to tell you – it’s such an unbelievable thing to see – even the kids who don’t wear kippot are very traditionally inclined. For example, they’ll say a berachah before they eat or they’ll put on tefillin in the morning. It’s an interesting perspective, which I don’t think we see as much in America.

What ages are the campers and what are the hours of these camps?

Ages 12 through 16 or 17. They start at eight in the morning and go to very late in the afternoon. But our students live in the towns, so the relationship doesn’t end at the end of the day. They hang out with our students on Shabbos or they’ll join us for Seudat Shlishit. It’s a fully immersive experience.

71 Olim From Ethiopia Land in Israel

Sunday, February 5th, 2012

71 Ethiopians made Aliyah on Thursday, accompanied by leaders from the Jewish Federations of North America.

Upon their arrival, the new immigrants were taken to an absorption center in Kiryat Gat where they will live while integrating into Israel.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/71-olim-from-ethiopia-land-in-israel/2012/02/05/

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