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April 21, 2014 / 21 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Professor Yitzchok Levine’

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Readers Sound Off…

A male reader has some advice for the divorced woman caught in a prolonged relationship with a married man (as related by A frustrated friend in Chronicles of 2-10-12).

Dear Rachel,

Mine is a male perspective on the cheating husband who is dating that good-looking woman. I too (and I am not proud of it) cheated on my wife with a co-worker. And let me tell you from the get-go that if this man were serious about this woman, she wouldn’t still be waiting for his move some three years later.

Rachel, your answer was 100% right on target! I fell in love with my co-worker, and it took six months for me to give my wife both a legal divorce and a “get.” Today I am a happily married man!

My wife cried at first. She was shocked and didn’t want to accept it, but it is a man’s world out there, and we do have the power to get on with our lives if need be.

Men are cold and callous. I lost contact with my children, but I started fresh. It’s now been seven years and I have a new family. This woman who the letter talks about is in her own world. She can’t see past his lies. Does he spend holidays with her? Does he spend his Saturdays with her? Does he go out with her in public, to restaurants, weddings or friends’ houses?

Does he introduce her to his friends? Has she ever even visited his supposed humble abode? If he makes all kinds of excuses or says he can’t because he is a married man, then I think it’s high time for her to wake up. He is just playing her and she is fulfilling his needs (whether physical or emotional).

Lady, he is a married man, like it or not! Do not settle for some crumbs that he throws your way. If he would really be serious about you he would indicate it by your having a MRS. next to his name.

Three years is long enough! Don’t be his fool any longer! When will the truth finally dawn on you, when you’ll be 30 years down the road instead of 3?

Been there and done the right thing

* * * * *

A university professor takes a stand on the topic of a girl’s (and boy’s) high school education (see Chronicles of 12-23-2011; 1-13-12; 2-17-12; 3-2-12).

Dear Rachel,

I have read several of the letters commenting on Bais Yaakov’s high school education and would like to address the issue of simple cooking and sewing.

In my opinion, every young person – both boys and girls – should be taught the basics of cooking and sewing. These are life skills and one never knows when one may have to rely on them.

I know of a young woman who unfortunately passed away a few years ago leaving two young daughters. Her husband had absolutely no experience cooking and hence had no idea how to prepare meals for his daughters. Neighbors and relatives helped out for a while, but in the long run this was not feasible. I am sure he regretted that he had no experience in the kitchen.

When it comes to sewing, we all know that buttons fall off and that seams rip. Should not every young person, male and female, be taught to make these simple repairs?

According to at least one of the letters published, cooking and sewing are not always taught in the home. If so, it is most important that they be taught in school, in both Bais Yaakov and yeshiva. Young people need to be equipped with these basic survival skills.

Professor Yitzchok Levine

* * * * *

How to combat the danger that lurks in our midst: A reader takes a hard line approach to dealing with child molesters and predators.

Dear Rachel,

We just celebrated Purim, Pesach is almost upon us, and Shavuos will be here before we know it — all holidays observed joyfully with family togetherness.

For some of us, however, these special days are shrouded by a dark cloud that hangs over us, one of family dysfunction, hostility, and most of all anger and hurt.

While to the world we appear to be the model Jewish Family, we are not. As others celebrated Purim with children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, aunts, uncles and cousins, for us it was a day of shame, loneliness and detachment.

You see my family is dealing with an issue that most of you only read about in books, newspapers, and on the Internet. The issue is molestation and endangerment of children.

We, as a community, need to grow up and deal with this all-encompassing crucial matter, because innocent young boys and girls do not invent graphic sexual accounts about close family relatives.

Letters To The Editor

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

What Were They Thinking? Re “Jewish Leaders: Arabs Counting on Israel to Eliminate Iran Threat” (front page news story, Feb. 24):

I was troubled by some comments attributed to officials of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. While I recognize the value of having capable organizational leaders with access to heads of state around the world, I wonder whether revealing what the discussions were all about is helpful.

It would seem to me that if this kind of “back channel” is to be useful, those interested in sending a message must have absolute confidence in the discretion of their messengers. I wonder whether the Arab leaders who were met with were all that happy with the disclosure that they are on board with Israel on significant issues. They, as well as Israel, live in a very dangerous neighborhood.

Also, I hope the positive spin on the intentions of Arab leaders with respect to Iran and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict will not serve to feed the pressure on Israel to make further concessions. Andrew Schiller (Via E-Mail)

 

Israel Must Decide The news that American intelligence agencies are advising the president that they have discovered no evidence Iran is moving toward a nuclear military capacity confirms my feeling that Israel is to be isolated regarding Iran in the coming weeks and months (“Division Over Iran?” editorial, Feb. 24).

Of course, the news came just days after the UN’s nuclear monitoring agency came to precisely the opposite conclusion. While Israel is not alone in having reasonable fears of a nuclear Iran, it is in most immediate and direct danger. In the final analysis, it has to be Israel that finally decides on a matter so critical to its survival. Yehudit Franco Jerusalem

 

Rebbetzin Weinberg I thoroughly enjoyed the article in last week’s Magazine section on Rebbetzin Chana Weinberg, a”h, by her grandson Yehuda Weisbord (“Comforting the Afflicted: The Life of Rebbetzin Chana Weinberg”).

Her life of courage and dedication, as lovingly portrayed by her grandson, is a true inspiration. She was the daughter of a Talmudic genius and was also married to one, but she seemed to have a lifelong mission of her own, putting her superior intelligence and creative talents at the service of Jews in need.

One has but to look at her face to just know she was especially compassionate, introspective, utterly unflappable and completely comfortable with her role in life – a mix that is of inestimable value to those in desperate need of guidance and comfort. Menachem Abromovitch (Via E-Mail)

 

Article Inspires Fond Memories Dr. Rivkah Blau’s “A Landscape Transformed: Orthodoxy and America’s Elite Universities” (front-page essay, Feb. 24) was of particular interest to me, since I lived in Elizabeth from 1968 to 1974 and had the privilege of knowing Rav Mordechai Pinchas Teitz, zt”l. I also know Dr. Blau, her husband Rabbi Yosef Blau, and her brother Rabbi Elazar Mayer Teitz.

In her article Dr. Blau writes, “Mr. Levy also underwrote the kosher facility at Stevens Institute of Technology.”

I came to Stevens in 1968 and, after seeing the virtual non-existence of any formal Jewish life on campus, decided a kosher dining club was needed. I was able to convince a group of boys to join a kosher dining club if I could get one started. I went to Rav Teitz and told him what I wanted to do. I will never forget his reply: “We started Princeton and now we must help Stevens.” This was Rav Teitz’s way. He was a doer.

Shortly thereafter he gave me a check for $1,000 to start the dining club in the basement of a nearby synagogue. Truth be told, until I read in Dr. Blau’s article that Mr. Levy supplied the funds, I never knew where they came from.

The dining club lasted only one year, unfortunately. Some of the boys lived on the third floor of the shul, and the rabbi expected them to help make the daily minyan. Given that only one of the boys had a yeshiva education, it is not surprising that they resisted this. At the end of a year the congregation decided it did not want the dining club in its synagogue, and that was the end of it.

Reading Dr. Blau’s article brought back many memories, even though I had nothing to do with Princeton and its Jewish activities. The mention of my friend Rabbi Dr. Leon (Eliezer) Ehrenpreis, z”l, is just one of them. Professor Yitzchok Levine Brooklyn, NY

Editor’s Note: Dr. Levine writes the popular monthly Glimpses Into American Jewish History column for The Jewish Press. This month’s installment can be found on page 68.

 

Demonizing Obama Recently I posted comments on several Orthodox websites defending President Obama from the absurd charges that he’s an anti-Semite and that he wishes to harm Israel. I wish to share some of my feelings with your readers.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/letters-to-the-editor/letters-to-the-editor-204/2012/02/29/

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