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August 29, 2014 / 3 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘territory’

Israeli, PA Envoys Meet in Jordan to Talk Peace

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Israeli envoy, Yitzhak Molho, and Palestinian representative, Saeb Erekat, met in Amman, Jordan on Monday in attempts to restart a dialogue that had been dormant for over a year. No official comment was released by either delegation upon the meeting’s conclusion.

Both parties have consented to bringing comprehensive proposals on territory and security to the Quartet by January 26. But the Palestinians have insisted that Israel renew a settlement freeze and commit to a solution based on pre-1967 borders in order for the negotiations to continue. For its part, Israel continues to call for negotiations without preconditions.

Hamas PM Insists that the Armed Struggle Against Israel Will Continue

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh, in the midst of a tour of Arab countries, spoke to a raucous crowd in Tunis and assured them that Hamas would never relinquish its arms, its territory, or its role as the guardian of Palestinian claims to Jerusalem. The crowd responded with chants of “Death to Israel” and “the army of Mohammed is back,” according to AFP.

The Islamist Ennahda party, which recently won the Tunisian elections, organized the rally.

Commemorating Liquidation Of The Lodz (Litzmannstadt) Ghetto

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

     In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

 

     The Lodz Ghetto was one of the largest on Polish territory (second to the Warsaw Ghetto). Established in February 1939 and liquidated in August 1944, it lasted longer than the other ghettos. Approximately 200,000 men, women and children were imprisoned in the Lodz ghetto throughout its existence.

 

     The organization of the Lodz Ghetto became a role model for the Warsaw Ghetto and other ghettos. In 1941 the Germans began deporting Jews from Prague, Vienna, Luxembourg, Berlin, D?sseldorf, Emden, Frankfurt, Hamburg and Cologne into the Lodz Ghetto. Within one month 19,954 Jews from Western Europe were deported and in few next months the Germans transported another 18,000 Jews from liquidated provincial ghettos.

 

    According to the German policy only Jews capable of work could stay in the ghetto. Those who were not able to work were sent to the death camp in Chelmno where the Germans killed 80 000 Jews.

 

    On August 9, 1944 the first transport from Lodz to Auschwitz took place. Deportees were informed that they were going deep into the Third Reich. In reality they were sent straight into the gas chambers in Auschwitz-Birkenau. Until August 9, 1944 the Germans had deported 67,000 Lodz Ghetto inhabitants. It is estimated that when the Nazis liquidated the ghetto, there were only 12-15,000 inhabitants. After the liquidation, only 800 Jews were left for cleaning. Most of those survived. 

 

      This coming week the city of Lodz is holding a weeklong conference in memory of the victims of the Ghetto.

 

       The conference will include many well-known speakers, feature films, new exhibits, and concerts as well as the unveiling of new monuments at the Survivors Park, dedicated to survivors and those that helped them survive.

Commemorating Liquidation Of The Lodz (Litzmannstadt) Ghetto

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

     In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

 

     The Lodz Ghetto was one of the largest on Polish territory (second to the Warsaw Ghetto). Established in February 1939 and liquidated in August 1944, it lasted longer than the other ghettos. Approximately 200,000 men, women and children were imprisoned in the Lodz ghetto throughout its existence.

 

     The organization of the Lodz Ghetto became a role model for the Warsaw Ghetto and other ghettos. In 1941 the Germans began deporting Jews from Prague, Vienna, Luxembourg, Berlin, Düsseldorf, Emden, Frankfurt, Hamburg and Cologne into the Lodz Ghetto. Within one month 19,954 Jews from Western Europe were deported and in few next months the Germans transported another 18,000 Jews from liquidated provincial ghettos.

 

    According to the German policy only Jews capable of work could stay in the ghetto. Those who were not able to work were sent to the death camp in Chelmno where the Germans killed 80 000 Jews.

 

    On August 9, 1944 the first transport from Lodz to Auschwitz took place. Deportees were informed that they were going deep into the Third Reich. In reality they were sent straight into the gas chambers in Auschwitz-Birkenau. Until August 9, 1944 the Germans had deported 67,000 Lodz Ghetto inhabitants. It is estimated that when the Nazis liquidated the ghetto, there were only 12-15,000 inhabitants. After the liquidation, only 800 Jews were left for cleaning. Most of those survived. 

 

      This coming week the city of Lodz is holding a weeklong conference in memory of the victims of the Ghetto.

 

       The conference will include many well-known speakers, feature films, new exhibits, and concerts as well as the unveiling of new monuments at the Survivors Park, dedicated to survivors and those that helped them survive.

Where There’s A Will…

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

If George F. Will comes across to some as a starchy combination of ministerial and professorial, he can blame it on his genes: The longtime columnist is, after all, the grandson of a Lutheran minister and the son of a philosophy professor.

He is also as unflinching a defender of Israel as they come in the American media.

Will first came to public attention in the 1970s as an articulate, polished representative of the emerging backlash against political and cultural liberalism. He always evinced a strong sympathy for Israel.

Writing in 1977 when the Carter administration was blaming Israel for its alleged intransigence, Will framed the issue in terms that resonate 32 years later:

“[T]he contagious crossness between Washington and Jerusalem that originated in Washington is a compound of Washington impatience and Israeli anxiety. The anxiety is more reasonable than the impatience…. The secure are always exhorting Israel to be daring.”

In a 1987 Newsweek column titled “A Just War Remembered,” Will cut through the muck of leftists who were using the 20th anniversary of the Six-Day War to lament Israel’s lopsided victory:

“It has been 20 years since those six days that shook the world,” he wrote. “Because of what happened then, a united Jerusalem is capital of Israel, and Israel never again will be 12 miles wide at the waist…. And, because of the echoing thunderclap from Israel 20 Junes ago, the security of Israel and hence the spiritual well-being of world Jewry have been enhanced. The Holocaust ended in 1945, but the Holocaust as aspiration was not destroyed until June 1967, when Israel smashed encircling armies that had the inescapably genocidal mission of obliterating the national gathering of Jews.”

Last month Will was the featured speaker at a dinner celebrating the Claremont Review of Books. According to Jewish Current Issues blogger and occasional Jewish Press op-ed contributor Rick Richman, Will “gave a masterful speech that included a mixture of political insight, conservative philosophy, humor and baseball stories.”

Responding to a post-speech question from the floor, Will delivered a rousing discourse on Israel, President Obama and recent Middle East history, which included the following highlights as recorded by Richman:

[I]n the 61 years since Israel was founded on one-sixth of one percent of land in that area described as land of the Arab world, there has not been a moment of peace for Israel, not as peace is properly understood.How many Americans understand that when Israel was founded in 1948, no Palestinian state was invaded, no Palestinian state was destroyed? There had not been a Palestinian geographic entity since between the departure of the Romans and the arrival of British rule.

How many know that the West Bank, referred to by the president as “occupied territory,” inferentially as occupied Palestinian territory, is under international law [an] unallocated portion of the Palestine Mandate rightfully occupied by Israel, because it occupied it in repelling aggression that came from that territory in 1967? [Applause]

How the president believes that if we return to the 1967 borders, the antipathy to Israel, which predated the 1967 borders, will disappear, I do not know….

I remember – if I could go back to an autobiographical moment – in 1979 I was invited to talk to the B’nai B’rith of Beverly Hills – not a nest of conservatives – and they said, “Who should be the Republican nominee?” And I said, pick Howard Baker, George Bush, Ronald Reagan. And they said “Well, who would be best for Israel?” And I responded, “Of course it would be Ronald Reagan.” They said, “Why?”

I said – “Two reasons: he believes in aircraft carriers. He believes in the projection of American power. Second, he is a romantic. He’s got the story of Israel, plucky little Israel.”

You need both. You need aircraft carriers and you need to appreciate the fact that Israel is an embattled salient of our values in a bad neighborhood. [Applause] It is unworthy of the United States to aspire to be even-handed between those who would destroy and those who would preserve the only democracy in that region. [Applause]

“Will,” Richman notes, “was speaking extemporaneously, without notes, to an unanticipated question.”

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

Culinary ‘Boot Camp’ Launched In Brooklyn

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

   The economy is directing people towards cost-consciousness and dining in, rather than dining out. For many of these former restaurant-goers, especially singles who live on their own, the kitchen is alien territory. Perhaps they can prep a basic sandwich, or boil a box of pasta. But needing to feed a family or guests on an ongoing basis requires a bit more creativity and skill.

 

   For those who want to become more competent in preparing foods at home, attending a culinary “boot camp” is a very practical investment.

 

   But what is a culinary boot camp? Simply, it is a program designed to bring like-minded people together to attain a common goal; to learn how to use kitchen tools, techniques and ingredients efficiently and with confidence.

 

   Jesse Blonder, director of the Center for Kosher Culinary Arts (CKCA) in Brooklyn, NY, has developed a series of classes titled, “Into the Kitchen: A Culinary Boot Camp for the Home Cook” for men and women, teens and adults who want to develop cooking skills and repertoire. Some already are cooking on their own but want to formalize their knowledge. Others want to broaden their repertoire, or wish to be able to entertain at home, or follow recipes correctly. Lately, callers have indicated they’d like to be able to develop creative meals on a budget.

 

   “In your typical home kitchen, women – and men – can often feel intimidated by multi-step recipes or the need to produce multi-course meals. They are afraid of using a real knife – such as the traditional chef’s knife – for chopping,” said Blonder. “More often than not, home cooks think cooking is simply following a recipe but have no idea at all what they are really doing. They use hit-and-miss approaches, tend to over or under cook things, and don’t know how to balance flavors or use spices. They know little about selecting cuts of meat and about quality and value issues. What home cooks need is more understanding about basic cooking processes, the chemistry of cooking, and how to approach and organize their cooking lives. In culinary boot camp they learn about value and quality say, fresh fish, the use of seasonal produce, and more tricks of the trade.”

 

   Blonder continues, “We are seeing a chronic explosion of new kallahs who have never been allowed to cook by themselves. Often, their mother took the burden off of them, thinking it was a kindness. Now, the kallah is lost when she has to prepare her first Shabbos meal.”

 

   For future kallahs, culinary boot camp classes present an opportunity to prepare to run their new home with confidence, having gained solid information about nutrition as well as taste. They can plan their menus efficiently and economically and not be overwhelmed by hostessing.

 

   In addition, attending the classes is a good way to explore whether one would like to train as a culinary professional, a goal that requires a much greater investment of time and money.

 

   For more information, visit www.kosherculinaryarts.com or call 718.758.1339. 

Culinary ‘Boot Camp’ Launched In Brooklyn

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

   The economy is directing people towards cost-consciousness and dining in, rather than dining out. For many of these former restaurant-goers, especially singles who live on their own, the kitchen is alien territory. Perhaps they can prep a basic sandwich, or boil a box of pasta. But needing to feed a family or guests on an ongoing basis requires a bit more creativity and skill.

 

   For those who want to become more competent in preparing foods at home, attending a culinary “boot camp” is a very practical investment.

 

   But what is a culinary boot camp? Simply, it is a program designed to bring like-minded people together to attain a common goal; to learn how to use kitchen tools, techniques and ingredients efficiently and with confidence.

 

   Jesse Blonder, director of the Center for Kosher Culinary Arts (CKCA) in Brooklyn, NY, has developed a series of classes titled, “Into the Kitchen: A Culinary Boot Camp for the Home Cook” for men and women, teens and adults who want to develop cooking skills and repertoire. Some already are cooking on their own but want to formalize their knowledge. Others want to broaden their repertoire, or wish to be able to entertain at home, or follow recipes correctly. Lately, callers have indicated they’d like to be able to develop creative meals on a budget.

 

   “In your typical home kitchen, women – and men – can often feel intimidated by multi-step recipes or the need to produce multi-course meals. They are afraid of using a real knife – such as the traditional chef’s knife – for chopping,” said Blonder. “More often than not, home cooks think cooking is simply following a recipe but have no idea at all what they are really doing. They use hit-and-miss approaches, tend to over or under cook things, and don’t know how to balance flavors or use spices. They know little about selecting cuts of meat and about quality and value issues. What home cooks need is more understanding about basic cooking processes, the chemistry of cooking, and how to approach and organize their cooking lives. In culinary boot camp they learn about value and quality say, fresh fish, the use of seasonal produce, and more tricks of the trade.”

 

   Blonder continues, “We are seeing a chronic explosion of new kallahs who have never been allowed to cook by themselves. Often, their mother took the burden off of them, thinking it was a kindness. Now, the kallah is lost when she has to prepare her first Shabbos meal.”

 

   For future kallahs, culinary boot camp classes present an opportunity to prepare to run their new home with confidence, having gained solid information about nutrition as well as taste. They can plan their menus efficiently and economically and not be overwhelmed by hostessing.

 

   In addition, attending the classes is a good way to explore whether one would like to train as a culinary professional, a goal that requires a much greater investment of time and money.

 

   For more information, visit www.kosherculinaryarts.com or call 718.758.1339. 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/culinary-boot-camp-launched-in-brooklyn/2009/02/11/

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