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December 18, 2014 / 26 Kislev, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘World Series’

A Pair Of Pitchers… And Some Welcome Changes

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Craig Breslow and Jason Marquis will be wearing different uniforms this season.

The two pitchers also share a unique trait among those labeled “Jewish players” by the media: Breslow and Marquis both have two Jewish parents.

Most of today’s so-called Jewish players just have one Jewish parent (usually the father) and had no real connection with Judaism while growing up. Assimilation has taken its toll on baseball, too.

Marquis, pronounced Mar-kee, grew up in a family that attended a Conservative synagogue, and he had some Hebrew education and a bar mitzvah. Marquis made his baseball reputation playing ball in the Staten Island area and made his big league debut at 22 in 2001.

He dreidled around with six National League teams since then before signing as a free agent with his seventh – the Minnesota Twins. Last year Jason had a good start with Washington, going 8-5, with a 3.95ERA before being dealt to the Arizona Diamondbacks. He didn’t impress his new team, losing his only decision and posting a high ERA of 9.53 before an injury shelved him for the rest of the season.

Breslow,31, has never started a major league game while with five big league teams. A valuable lefty reliever, he was traded by Oakland to the Diamondbacks, his sixth team. He’s equally tough against right-handed and left-handed batters, with righties hitting a combined .224 against him and lefties just .227

Breslow grew up in Connecticut and attended a Reform temple in Bridgeport before heading to Yale. He majored in biochemistry and molecular biophysics and is considered by most as the smartest player in the big leagues.

Breslow has talked about going to medical school after his playing career. He’s been particularly interested in childhood cancer research since his sister was diagnosed with thyroid cancer at the age of 14.

* * * * *

Baseball finally got it right: Fifteen teams in each league; three divisions of five teams each in both the A.L. and the N.L.

Moving the Houston Astros from the National League to the American League’s West division rights a longtime wrong. The A.L. West had only four teams and the American League had one fewer team than the National.

And Houston’s being in the same division with the Texas Rangers will create an instant rivalry in the Lone Star State.

MLB also created another Wild Card slot for the postseason, with a one game winner-take-all for the right to be the Wild Card team in the playoffs. The one game gives the division winners an extra day off. Sure, the one game means the team with the inferior record might beat the Wild Card club with a better record, but that’s why teams have to try harder to win the division.

Before, a team – such as St. Louis last season – just had to win the Wild Card to get into the postseason. Now managers have to shoot for winning their division.

It should translate into much more interesting Octobers. But we will have to wait until 2013 for its implementation.

Author, columnist and lecturer Irwin Cohen headed a national baseball publication for five years before earning a World Series ring in a front office capacity. Cohen, the president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul, may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.

Fantasy Come True

Monday, November 14th, 2011

Seventy-eight degrees and sunny.

That’s what it was that Thursday afternoon in November when I arrived in Tampa, site of the Yankees Fantasy Camp.

After checking into the Sheraton Suites where the campers were staying for the Monday through Saturday camp, I shuttled to George M. Steinbrenner Field (where the Yanks play during spring training and also the home of the Tampa Yankees, three levels below the major leagues), to join the camp in progress.

I met with Julie Kremer, who juggles many balls in her roles as assistant general manager of the Tampa Yankees and director of the fantasy camp. I also met with Ira Jaskoll. He was a first-time camper last year and brought his own food.

Based on his experience, Jaskoll approached Julie K. with the idea of providing kosher food, designating a room in the hotel for Shabbat services and dining, and moving the big dream game from Saturday to Friday to accommodate future Orthodox campers.

Julie agreed and under her direction “the Rabbi,” as former Yankees players who coached and instructed Jaskoll last year affectionately call him, made all the necessary arrangements for the 2009 camp.

After catching up with Julie and Ira, it was time to partake in the on-field banquet and join the kosher campers. We took the table near second base and Jesse Barfield asked if he could join us. Barfield, an outfielder who played 12 big league seasons and spent 1989 through 1992 with the Yankees, led the American League in home runs with 40 in 1986 while playing for Toronto.

“Do you still do a lot of woodworking?” I asked Barfield. “How did you know that?” he responded. “Because,” I said, “while I was interviewing you about 25 years ago in the visiting clubhouse at Tiger Stadium, I asked you what you like to do when you have free time.”

“Wow,” Barfield exclaimed, “you’ve got a good memory.”

Former Yankees PR man Marty Appel was the guest speaker and spoke about Thurman Munson, the subject of his latest book. The next day was a bit more humid but still beautiful.

I watched the campers play Friday morning and lunched with the kosher guys and others in a picturesque outdoor pavilion between the stadium and practice fields.

A couple of the spouses of the six kosher campers flew in to be on hand for the big Friday game. Also on hand were Sharon and Jerry Volk, friends of the Jaskolls, there to root the rabbi on and enjoy the sun. Wives and children of other campers also came to enjoy the weekend.

It was a regular stadium atmosphere complete with the national anthem and the great voice of Yankee Stadium, Paul Olden. The campers, who got to dress in the same clubhouse the Yankees use during spring training and play on the same field, now heard themselves being introduced by the same voice on the public address system.

Some of the former Yankees who participated in the game were Barfield, Ron Blomberg, Homer Bush, Chris Chambliss, Al Downing, Tommy John, Phil Linz, Fritz Peterson, Mickey Rivers and Roy White.

Shabbat exceeded my expectations as the food was plentiful, the portions large, the company excellent and the speakers (Marty Appel, Ron Blomberg and yours truly) interesting. The camp ended on a real high with the closing Saturday night banquet. Awards named after former Yankee greats were given out to campers who excelled in several categories.

All the campers I talked with – kosher and otherwise – said they wanted to come back again. Several already were repeaters and one nice fellow from New York actually has been there for 22 consecutive camps. And listen to this – he’s been to both the November and January camps. That’s actually 44 in a row! And after experiencing a bit of it I can understand why.

Another Season In The Books

Saturday, November 12th, 2011

Wow! What a finish to the 2011 baseball season. Even before the interesting seven-game World Series won by St. Louis, there was incredible drama in the final month.

On the final day of the 162-game regular season, the Atlanta Braves and the Boston Red Sox both ended bad Septembers with one-run losses that ended any hope of a postseason berth.

Boston won only seven games while losing 20 in September, leading to exits by long-time manager Tito Francona and general manager Theo Epstein. The latter was for years considered baseball’s resident young genius by the media, but he was always helped out by the Red Sox having more money to spend than most franchises. The Sox, with baseball’s third highest payroll ($161.8 million) were caught and overtaken by the Tampa Bay Rays with a payroll of only $41.1 million (29th out of 30 teams).

The Yankees had the largest payroll at $202.7 million – and were eliminated in the first round of playoffs by the Detroit Tigers, who shelled out  $105.7 million on their players. The Texas Rangers, with the 13th highest payroll ($92.3 million), survived both playoff rounds to get to the World Series.

Theo Epstein spent big bucks on a full-page ad in the Boston Globe to thank Red Sox fans and the Red Sox organization. Epstein, who was responsible for the signing of several free agents who produced to less than their capabilities, opted to leave his native Fenway stomping grounds to try to produce better results with the  Chicago Cubs.

While the Red Sox were saddled with hefty contracts, injuries and some bad performances by highly paid players were responsible for keeping Boston out of the postseason. Free agent Carl Crawford, who batted .319 with 19 home runs and 47 stolen bases for Tampa Bay in 2010, hit just .255 with 11 homers and had 18 stolen bases for Boston in 2011. Red Sox Nation expected a lot more as Crawford inked a seven-year $142-million deal.

Adrian Gonzalez, the star first baseman for the San Diego Padres lured to Boston, played up to expectations (.338, 27 homers, 117 RBI). Kevin Youkilis, one of the few big leaguers with two Jewish parents, hit .285 in the first half of  the 2011 season and only .199 after the All-Star break. Lingering injuries kept Youkilis from playing the final two weeks of the season.

Boston needs pitching but the bats should be back strong in 2012. The Cubs, however, are a different story. Even if Epstein signs a big bat like first baseman Prince Fielder, the lovable Cubbies have several aging players who are hard to trade because of hefty contracts and reputations for not being too popular with their teammates.

General managers have  to be careful shelling out the big bucks. The White Sox are stuck with Adam Dunn for three more  years. Dunn, who averaged 40 homers a year in the six season from 2004 through 2010 with thee Washington Nationals, had a dismal 2011. Ken Williams, the White Sox general manager, expected a lot more from Dunn, who batted .159 and contributed 11 home runs before he was benched for the season.

There will be lots of excitement this off-season until free agent stars such as Albert Pujols, Prince Fielder and Jose Reyes sign their new long- term megabuck pacts.

My prediction is that Pujols will stay with St. Louis, Fielder will opt for the Cubs and Reyes will join the Detroit Tigers.

Comerica Park, home of the Detroit Tigers. Downtown Detroit is making a comeback, and Tigers fans are hoping Mets shortstop Jose Reyes will sign with Detroit as a free agent.

The Marlins’ Coming New Stadium And More

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

While there are great rates on fares to the Miami area this time of year, it’s not a place most people want to visit in the summer, unless, of course, they have relatives or good friends to visit or a simcha to attend.

 

Next year, however, baseball fans will have good reason to hit Miami. The Marlins, who have been playing in an open stadium that doubles for football and that offers late afternoon rain and a hot sun with very little protection from both, will have a new home.

 

The Marlins will be moving south, away from Hollywood to the site that formerly housed the Orange Bowl near downtown Miami. It will add more driving time to south Florida’s large Jewish population, but it will be worth it.

 

The stadium’s retractable roof will shield fans from sun, rain and oppressive heat. The ballpark will accommodate a cozy 37,000, and an operable wall in left field will provide spectacular views of downtown Miami. Colorful walking areas under the stands will allow baseball pedestrians to view many works of art.

 

            A large aquarium behind and on each side of home plate will remind spectators of Florida’s attractions. The big (51 feet high by 101 feet wide) high-definition scoreboard will keep fans informed and entertained.

 

 


Recent photo of the new Marlins ballpark

under construction in downtown Miami

 

 

Part art gallery and part shopping center, the ballpark will feature a very special room for us. According to Marlins vice chairman Joel Mael, the highest-ranking Orthodox Jew ever in baseball, there will be a room for davening.

 

“Our new ballpark will have the first dedicated minyan room,” Joel says. “We plan to have a regular weekday minyan for Minchah and Maariv.”

 

Kosher food will also be available. So plan on taking advantage of those summer fares to Florida in 2012.

 

*     *     *

 

You’ll be hearing a lot about Paul Goldschmidt. Drafted by the Arizona Diamondbacks in the eighth round of the 2009 Major League Baseball June Amateur Draft, Goldschmidt was signed and sent to the low Pioneer League to play first base for the rest of that season. In 287 at bats, Goldschmidt batted .334 with 18 home runs. Promoted to Visalia in the California League in 2010, Goldschmidt tore up the league (.314, 35 home runs and 108 RBI).

 

This year, Goldschmidt was promoted again to Arizona’s double-A affiliate, Mobile in the Southern League. Goldschmidt, a 6-3, 245-pound right-handed batter, became the first minor leaguer at any level to hit 20 home runs. He was on pace to hit over .300, over 40 homers, and over 100 RBI.

 

However, the Diamondbacks feel he may not need any more time in the minors. He’s that good. Now, I know what you’re thinking: a big right-handed hitting first baseman who can hit for average and power. Just like Hank Greenberg. You may be right over the course of time. However, there’s one difference. Greenberg was Jewish, Goldschmidt is not.

 

So adopt him if you will as a future star player – but not as a Jewish star player. Shel Wallman’s Jewish Sports Review is a good way to follow Jewish athletes on all levels. But, you should know that JSR identifies athletes as Jewish as long as they have one Jewish parent from either side.

 

*     *     *

 

The Red Sox started the season by losing their first six games. After 12 games they were 2 and 10. Some of you sent me e-mails asking if I still thought the BoSox would represent the American League in the World Series. I stuck with Boston then and am doing so even more now.

 

As I mentioned a few months ago, Detroit can beat the Yankees or any other American League team except Boston in the postseason. And when the dust settles in the National league, the Phillies will be standing on top.


 


 


 


Irwin Cohen headed a national baseball publication for five years and earned a World Series ring while working for a major league team. To read his illustrated autobiography on how an Orthodox Jew made it to the baseball field, send a check payable for $19.95 to Irwin Cohen.  Mail to 25921 Stratford Place, Oak Park, Michigan 48237Cohen, the president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul, may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net 

Random Thoughts A Month Into The Season

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011


   A local Orthodox attendance record was set at Detroit’s Comerica Park on Sunday Chol Hamoed Pesach as an estimated 500 frum fans were in the stands. They saw a good game as the Tigers downed the White Sox 3-0 on a beautiful sunny day. Seven families from my shul returned with suntans and they reported many shuls were represented in all sections of the downtown ballpark, about a 20-minute ride from my dugout.

 

*     *     *

 

   It’s great to see Cleveland have a great April. The Indians finished the month with an 18-8 record, the best record in the American League. Only the Philadelphia Phillies over in the National League matched the Indians’ record.

 

   If you want to visit a nice downtown ballpark and a nice Jewish community, take a trip to Cleveland. Only about seven miles straight up Cedar Street from the home of the Indians is Taylor Road, the main street in Cleveland Heights, hub of the Orthodox community. If you continue up Cedar, it takes you through other adjoining communities.

 

*     *     *

 

   Remember the good old days when we didn’t have to check our e-mails and people didn’t walk around with phones attached to their ears? And when we never heard of something called a “pitch count”?

 

   Pitchers were expected to finish what they started and the good ones did. In 1963 Warren Spahn was 42 years old but the great lefty enjoyed his 13th 20-win season. Amazing.

 

   Even more amazing was a game on July 2 of that year. Spahn started for the old Milwaukee Braves (for you younger fans, the Braves would move to Atlanta a couple of years later; the present-day Milwaukee Brewers wouldn’t come into being until 1970) and faced off against the great Giants pitcher Juan Marichal (who would finish the 1960s as the winningest pitcher of that decade) in San Francisco’s windy Candlestick Park.

 

   Both pitchers were still in the game, hooked up in a scoreless duel, when Willie Mays homered in the bottom of the 16th inning to tag Spahn with a 1-0 loss. Until Mays’s homer, each pitcher had yielded only eight hits.

 

*     *     *

 

   Good riddance to Manny Ramirez. As many of you know, he abruptly quit the Tampa Bay Rays when it became known that he failed his second drug test and faced a 100-game suspension.

 

   Tampa Bay overpaid him and gave him another chance after he failed in a short stint with the Chicago White Sox last season. Two years ago he wore out his welcome with the Dodgers when he failed his first test and served a 50-game suspension. Manny had a short run as a celebrity among celebrities as Hollywood became “Mannywood.”

 

   Ramirez quit with a .312 lifetime average, 2,574 career hits and 555 career homers. Who knows how many of Manny’s round-trippers were performance-enhanced? There should, however, be a separate wing at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown for the steroid stars. They were great players and would still have been great without the added pump.

 

*     *     *

 

   I still can’t believe Andy Pettitte retired with a 240-138 career record. I thought the 38-year-old Pettitte would come back in May or June and try to win 10 games to reach 250 victories, giving him a much better shot at the Hall of Fame. His career ERA over 16 seasons is a pretty fair 3.88.

 

*     *     *

 

   Bengie Molina is the only player to be traded during the season and then face the team from whom he was traded in the World Series. Molina, who ended 2010 with the Texas Rangers, received two World Series rings. The veteran catcher has a silver ring for being on the losing team (Texas) and a gold one for being with San Francisco for the first few months of the season.

 

*     *     *

 

   When will Ichiro Suzuki reach 3,000 career hits? The steady 37-year-old Seattle outfielder, who’s had ten straight seasons of more than 200 hits, started this season with a career average of .331 and 2,244 hits.

 

   Ichiro got a late start in the majors as he starred in Japan’s big leagues before coming to this side of the ocean. Besides the bat, Ichiro can beat you with his speed, glove and arm. He’s a certain Hall of Famer.

 

 

   To order Irwin Cohen’s book on how an Orthodox Jew got into the baseball field, send a check for $19.95, payable to Irwin Cohen, 25921 Stratford Place, Oak Park, Mi 48237. Cohen, president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul, can be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.

A Mighty Fine Feller

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

Bob Feller was stubborn and opinionated – and, I must admit, I didn’t care for him too much at our first meeting over 30 years ago.

 

But the more our paths crossed and the more conversations we had, the more I liked him. I even came to admire him.

 

Feller, who died last month at age 92, was of course a great pitcher but he was also a savvy businessman. He played a major role in the formation of the players’ union and was the first player to incorporate. He headed off-season baseball barnstorming tours playing with and against Negro League players before the major leagues were finally integrated in 1947.

 

Feller chartered and even flew his own plane, hired the traveling secretary of the Cleveland Indians to handle bookings, and he paid all players, including the Negro Leaguers, well. Buck O’Neill, one of the Negro League stars born to soon to play in the majors, claimed he made more money with Feller’s tours than he did playing in the established Negro Leagues.

 

Feller’s story is an interesting one.

 

He made his big-league debut at the age of 17 in August 1936. The young fireballer pitched 62 innings and struck out 76 that season. And he just kept getting better. He already had won 107 games for the Cleveland Indians when he turned 21 in November 1941. But the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor a couple of weeks later and Feller opted to turn in his baseball uniform for a military one.

 

He didn’t have to give up the big-league life and big-league money. He could have claimed a deferral as a farmer whose father was too sick to operate the family farm in Iowa. But the patriotic pitcher joined the Navy and pushed aside the cushy assignments most big league players were able to get.

 

Feller wanted to serve as an ordinary American rather than a big-league star and found plenty of action in combat – including at Iwo Jima. He didn’t return from military service until late in the 1945 season, which meant he missed almost four full seasons in his prime. Even without those years, Feller still managed to rack up 266 victories.

 

As baseball commissioner Bud Selig noted at Feller’s passing, “Bob Feller was a great baseball player, but he was an even greater American.”

 

Baseball recently lost some other greats.

 

Cubs broadcaster and former third baseman Ron Santo compiled 342 home runs and a .277 batting average over a 15-year playing career and won the Gold Glove Award for defensive abilities five times. Santo was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at 18 but didn’t reveal it to teammates until his fourth season in the majors and fans found out two years after that.

 

It wasn’t easy dealing with diabetes during his career (1960-1974). Santo, who was a fixture in the Cubs broadcast booth for the last 21 years, liked to tell this story about one of the times his condition was acting up:

 

“I was in the on-deck circle and Billy Williams was up in the bottom of the ninth inning. I was hoping Williams would hit a home run and end the game so I wouldn’t have to bat, as I was seeing three of everything. Williams walked and I had to go up and bat. Since I saw what looked like three pitchers, I decided I would swing at the ball I was seeing in the middle. I did and hit a home run and somehow made it around the bases and we won the game.”

 

Santo was 70 when he passed away.

 

Phil Cavaretta, another Chicago legend, died at 94. He played for the Cubs for 20 years (1934-1953) before going to the White Sox for two seasons.

 

A first baseman-outfielder, Cavaretta topped the league in 1945 with a .355 average and led the Cubs to the World Series (they haven’t made it since). He batted an amazing .423 in the seven-game series but Hank Greenberg’s two home runs helped Detroit down the Cubs.

 

The biggest player of his time (6-5, 220), Walt Dropo died a month shy of his 88th birthday. He hailed from Moosup, Connecticut, which gave him the nickname “Moose.” Dropo had a great rookie year in 1950 with the Red Sox, batting .322 and swatting 34 home runs with 144 RBI in 136 games. The popular big guy never topped the .300 or 30-homer mark again in his 13-year career with Boston, Detroit, the White Sox, Cincinnati and Baltimore.

 

Gil McDougald, who spent his entire ten-year career (1951-1960) with the Yankees as an infielder, died at 82. A .276 lifetime hitter, McDougald was a valuable member of the Yankees, helping the club to eight World Series during his 10 seasons with the team, all under manager Casey Stengel.

 

While this has been an off-season tinged with sadness, teams have been busy, with many faces heading to new places. Since we can expect more wheeling and dealing, especially from the Yankees and Mets, who seem to have fallen further behind some other clubs, I’ll wait a while to give my opinions.

 

As always, your opinions are welcome.


 


 


Next month Irwin Cohen will tell us about being an Orthodox Jew in the baseball field. Cohen, president of the Detroit community’s Agudah shul, may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.com 

The Greatest World Series Finish Ever

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

It was a half-century ago but I still have vivid memories of 1960.

 

Television was still considered kosher and my favorite shows were mostly westerns. There were several at the time including my favorite, “Cheyenne,” starring Clint Walker. “Rawhide” featured the then unknown Clint Eastwood while “The Rifleman” starred former Dodgers and Cubs first baseman Chuck Connors.

 

I also tuned in to “Bonanza,” “Gunsmoke,” and “Maverick.” My mostly Yiddish-speaking grandparents preferred programs that bore the names of stars – Jack Benny, Perry Como, Ed Sullivan and Lawrence Welk.

 

Parents across the country were saddened by NBC’s decision to end “The Howdy Doody Show” after a 13-year run. (I visited Howdy last year; the puppet is on permanent display at the Detroit Institute of Arts.) Elvis Presley had several top tunes on the charts including “It’s Now or Never.” Chubby Checker introduced the Twist to America’s teens on Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand.”

 

Music lovers were saddened by the passing of Oscar Hammerstein II, the famous lyricist who wrote the words for so many classic musicals including “South Pacific,” “The Sound of Music” and “Oklahoma!”

 

On the political front, Vice President Richard Nixon was hoping to replace President Dwight D. Eisenhower in the upcoming election. Democratic presidential nominee John F. Kennedy, also eying the big prize, was drawing huge crowds at appearances. An outdoor September rally in Detroit drew an estimated 60,000 people to see the handsome, charismatic politician from Boston.

 

Speaking of Boston, Ted Williams ended his career on the last day of the season at Fenway Park by homering in his final major league at-bat. Despite missing almost five seasons to military service in World War II and the Korean War as a crack air force pilot, Williams compiled 521 home runs and a .344 career batting average.

 

The stars of the 1960 World Series, Bobby Richardson (left) and Bill Mazeroski,

pose for Irwin Cohen 25 years later, in 1985.

 

Despite Williams’s heroics through the season, Boston finished in seventh place, a staggering 32 games behind New York. The Yankees went to the World Series for the 10th time in 12 years under manager Casey Stengel.

 

The Pirates represented the National League. The Series opened at Pittsburgh’s Forbes Field, which had been built by the team’s Jewish owner Barney Dreyfuss in 1909. It was baseball’s first all steel and concrete ballpark and held only half of Yankee Stadium’s 65,000 capacity.

 

Over the first six games the Pirates were shut out twice by Whitey Ford and outscored 46 to 17, but managed to win three close ones.

 

The Pirates took a 4-0 lead after four innings in the seventh and deciding game, much to the delight of the noisy Forbes Field fans. But the Yankees posted a run in the fifth, four in the sixth and two more in the eighth to take a 7-3 lead.

 

The mood soon changed as the Pirates answered with five runs in their half of the 8th inning to take a 9-7 lead. The Yankees had no trouble coming up with the two runs needed to tie the score off of an ineffective Pirates pitching staff whose collective ERA ballooned to an all-time Series high of 7.11.

 

What followed was the most memorable ending in World Series history.

 

The youngest member of the Pirates lineup, 24-year-old Bill Mazeroski, led off the bottom of the ninth against Yankees pitcher Ralph Terry. Maz had a pretty good if not star-quality year with the bat (.273 and 11 home runs) and was valued for his superior defensive abilities.

 

Mazeroski smacked the second pitch he saw. Yankees left fielder Yogi Berra ran back to the wall as Maz raced to first base, slowing to a trot when the ball sailed over the vine-covered brick wall to end the World Series.

 

Fast-forward 50 years later. A 14-foot high bronze statue of Mazeroski was unveiled recently outside Pittsburgh’s beautiful PNC Park.

 

Mazeroski, now 74, played his entire 17-year career with the Pirates and compiled a .260 career average. His statue joins those of greater Pirates of the past, Honus Wagner, Roberto Clemente and Willie Stargell.

 

Wagner, Clemente and Stargell may have had more flashy careers, but Maz’s homer was the greatest moment in Pittsburgh – and certainly World Series – history. We’ll see if anything can top that this year.

 

 

The author of seven books, Irwin Cohen headed a national baseball publication for five years before embarking on a front office career earning a World Series ring. Cohen, who is president of the Detroit community’s Agudah shul, may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net. The Baseball Insider column appears the second week of each month.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/sports/the-greatest-world-series-finish-ever/2010/10/06/

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