Photo Credit: Jewish Press

The Rogatchover, in Tzafnas Paneach (Hilchos Kilayim 9:5) suggests a proof that semicha does not have to be performed by day. He says that regarding a korban of partners, in which each partner must perform semicha, one partner’s semicha will obviously not be performed immediately before the shechitah. Therefore, in this case, whereby the semicha does not have to be performed immediately before the shechitah, the semicha should be permitted to be performed at night. Accordingly, semicha would not be considered a mitzvas assei she’hazman gramma.

Two points: 1) According to the answer that we just concluded from the Acharonim, namely that we derive from a drasha that semicha must be performed during the day, even if it were not being performed immediately before the shechitah it would have to be performed during the day.

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2) I would suggest that when partners simultaneously perform semicha on the animal, it is considered that each semicha was performed immediately before the shechitah. Since they are all required to perform the semicha, it is considered to be one long, uninterrupted semicha. Thus semicha is always performed immediately before shechitah, and as such is considered a mitzvas assei she’hazman gramma.

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Rabbi Fuchs learned in Yeshivas Toras Moshe, where he became a close talmid of Rav Michel Shurkin, shlit”a. While he was there he received semicha from Rav Zalman Nechemia Goldberg, shlit”a. He then learned in Mirrer Yeshiva in Brooklyn, and became a close talmid of Rav Shmuel Berenbaum, zt”l. Rabbi Fuchs received semicha from the Mirrer Yeshiva as well. After Rav Shmuel’s petira Rabbi Fuchs learned in Bais Hatalmud Kollel for six years. He is currently a Shoel Umaishiv in Yeshivas Beis Meir in Lakewood, and a Torah editor and weekly columnist at The Jewish Press.

1 COMMENT

  1. The sugya goes on to make a very strong insight. A women may do semicha for the reason of b’nachat ruach, to elevate her spirituality, but not if the reason is to show off. I think we can apply this principle to many contemporary issues about women’s roles in Judaism. If it is truly for spiritual enrichment is is permitted, but not to show off. Think of WoW – which are they?

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