web analytics
September 19, 2014 / 24 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
News & Views
Sponsored Post
Apartment 758x530 Africa-Israel at the Israel Real Estate Exhibition in New York

Africa Israel Residences, part of the Africa Israel Investments Group led by international businessman Lev Leviev, will present 7 leading projects on the The Israel Real Estate Exhibition in New York on Sep 14-15, 2014.



Bilingual Boundary Stone Discovered at Tel Gezer


The 12th boundary stone from Tel Gezer, discovered over a decade before this latest find. The bilingual boundary stone features Greek and Hebrew text with personal and geographical titles.

The 12th boundary stone from Tel Gezer, discovered over a decade before this latest find. The bilingual boundary stone features Greek and Hebrew text with personal and geographical titles.
Photo Credit: Bibleplaces.com, Judah and the Dead Sea Collection

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/news/bilingual-boundary-stone-discovered-at-tel-gezer/

Archaeologists working at the Biblical site of Tel Gezer discovered a boundary stone inscribed with both Greek and Hebrew text dating to the period of conflict between the Seleucids and the Maccabees. This is the thirteenth known boundary stone found after over a century of excavations at Gezer, and it is the first to be found in over a decade. Archaeologists from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary also rediscovered another boundary stone originally discovered in the 19th-century by the French explorer Charles Claremont-Ganneau, but lost to the archaeological community for over a century.

In a Biblical Archaeology Review article promoting preservation at Gezer, BAR editor Hershel Shanks described the Biblical and archaeological history of the site.

Gezer is mentioned frequently in the Bible. Although Joshua defeated a coalition of Canaanite kings that included the king of Gezer, the Bible does not say that Gezer itself was captured by the Israelites (Joshua 10:33; 12:12). Gezer was allotted to the tribe of Joseph (or Ephraim) (Joshua 16:3, 10; Judges 1:29; 1 Chronicles 6:67; 7:28), but we are also told that the Israelites “did not drive out the Canaanites,” who dwelt in Gezer (Joshua 16:10). Even King David was unable to bring Gezer into the Israelite kingdom.

Finally, when an Egyptian Pharaoh (probably Siamun, in about 960 B.C.) gave his daughter in marriage to King Solomon—the only recorded instance of a Pharaoh’s daughter being permitted to marry a foreigner—the Pharaoh ceded Gezer to Solomon as part of his daughter’s dowry. (1 Kings 9:15–17). In the early years of Solomon’s reign, Egypt had launched an invasion of Palestine and had conquered Canaanite Gezer. Undoubtedly, Solomon then mobilized against an Egyptian attack on his own Israelite kingdom. But Israel must have been the greater power because at this point Egypt apparently decided to abandon the invasion, opting for a diplomatic rapprochement by marriage and territorial concession. Thereafter, the Bible tells us, Solomon fortified Gezer, along with Jerusalem, Megiddo and Hazor (1 Kings 9:15). Twentieth-century archaeologists have found irrefutable evidence of these fortifications at Gezer, including not only the magnificent gateway but also a casemate wall (a double wall divided by partitions into rooms) attached to it.

Gezer also has special significance in the history of archaeology. Gezer was the first Biblical city to be identified by an inscription found at the site. Even today only a handful of sites—Beth Shean, Arad, Hazor—have been so identified. In 1873, the great French scholar Clermont-Ganneau found a boundary inscription dating from the Herodian period which reads in Hebrew script, “boundary of Gezer.”

This final boundary stone was rediscovered in this season’s excavation. According to the excavator’s press release, the boundary stones reveal the Jewish occupants’ concern over keeping their fields according to Jewish law. Many of the boundary stones include the inscription “Region of Gezer” in Hebrew along with “Belonging to Alkos” in Greek. The newly-discovered thirteenth stone follows the inscriptions known from other boundary stones very closely, with a few exceptions. The weathered letters are larger than on other known examples, and the Hebrew and Greek text is written on the same side of the stone.

After a century of excavation, Gezer continues to produce interesting finds. In 2011, excavations of a Canaanite water system at Gezer uncovered a natural cave at the base of a tunnel system dug in the early 2nd millennium B.C.E.

More details on the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary excavations will be made public by the upcoming Hadashot Akrheologiyot publication on the first five years of the survey.

About the Author: Bible History Daily is a publication of the Biblical Archaeology Society.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

3 Responses to “Bilingual Boundary Stone Discovered at Tel Gezer”

  1. Stephen Leavitt says:

    Cool find.

  2. Funny, if the Palis were here "From Time In Memoriam" why isn't this in Arabic?
    Hummmmmmmmmmm

  3. DanPride says:

    More on the boundary stone on the Gezer Excavations on line database at
    http://www.archaeolibrary.com/ Pics are under the Format menu

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Gidon Saar (L) and Gilad Erdan (R) walking together in the Knesset.
Gilad Erdan May Replace Gidon Saar
Latest News Stories

The general did not say which variant of the missile the country bought, bu did mention the DF 21 is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

A mother greets her lone soldier at Ben-Gurion airport.

An airlift of 21 flights from El- Al Airlines flying from 10 different international locations, are bringing parents of lone soldiers serving in the IDF to Israel.

Hi-rise apartments under construction in Petach Tikva. (Illustration Photo)

Armi fell from the 13th floor of a building, when both his rappelling cables snapped.

Gidon Saar (L) and Gilad Erdan (R) walking together in the Knesset.

Gidon’s Saar’s quitting gives other Likud members the chance for promotion.

The poll shows that “Jewish Home” party members like and appreciate their current leadership.

It doesn’t matter your age, and there’s no embarrassment in other boys knowing, boys like toys that fly and that make big, loud sound, or do other cool stuff. In fact, if the boys are smart, they make it look very serious, so they can play with the toys at work too. That’s when remote […]

The people of Scotland have spoken: they will remain part of the United Kingdom.

Terrorists from Shuafat Refugee Camp opened fire at a home in Pisgat Ze’ev…

Defense official do not believe Hamas will actually begin shooting rockets at Israel over the next week or two.

Cruz sought but failed to obtain senate’s unanimous consent to pass Expatriate Terrorist Act of 2014.

Terror tunnel work accident leaves 1 terrorist dead.

The world’s oldest known Jewish prayer book, or siddur, was displayed for the first time to the general public at the Bible Lands Museum.

The cabinet is set to vote on the path of the security fence which would cut off Gush Etzion from Jerusalem as well as be a major eyesore.

UK Muslims are calling on ISIS to release British aid volunteer Alan Henning, whose life is now threatened by the group.

Border Police officers blocked an axe-toting Arab man from carrying out a terror attack near Jerusalem.

A Code Red incoming rocket alert was sounded for Gaza Belt and Ashkelon Coastal communities.

More Articles from Bible History Daily
The Qeiyafa Ostracon and the Gezer Calendar

Epigraphy scholar Christopher Rollston examined four contenders for the oldest Hebrew inscription – the Qeiyafa Ostracon, Gezer Calendar, Tel Zayit Abecedary and Izbet Zayit Abecedary – to explore the interplay between early Hebrew script and language.

The 12th boundary stone from Tel Gezer, discovered over a decade before this latest find. The bilingual boundary stone features Greek and Hebrew text with personal and geographical titles.

Archaeologists working at the Biblical site of Tel Gezer discovered a boundary stone inscribed with both Greek and Hebrew text dating to the period of conflict between the Seleucids and the Maccabees.

Discovered in a Roman-era excavation near the city of Silves, Portugal by archaeologists from the German Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the discovery predates the previous oldest evidence of Jews in Iberia by nearly a century.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/archaeology-news/bilingual-boundary-stone-discovered-at-tel-gezer/2012/05/31/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: