web analytics
July 26, 2014 / 28 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



Home » Sections » Food » Recipes »

Simple Home Cooking

Welcome to Part III – what to do with the cooked chicken. Our job is to rehydrate it, change the way it looks, and, at times, hide it using dough, eggs, mayonnaise, or sauce. I have found that making up fancy names for the dish not only adds flair, but will help your family know what to ask for next time. Unless otherwise stated these recipes serve 4-6 people. (Note: Though we use the word chicken – each recipe works just as well with meat or turkey.)

1. Salads

Chicken Salad A Ingredients

4 quarters of cooked or baked chicken ½ an onion ½ cup cooked carrots 4 pickles 4 tbsp. mayonnaise Salt & pepper to taste 4 tbsp. pickle juice or vinegar 1 tbsp. sugar (optional) Parsley for decoration

Remove chicken from the bones and cut into small cubes. Place in a large bowl. Cut carrots, onions, and pickles into small pieces and add to chicken. Add the mayonnaise and seasoning and mix well. Serve decorated with parsley and carrot slices on top.

Variations- Add ½ cup peas or ½ cup corn or 2 hard boiled eggs chopped. Add mayonnaise as needed.

Chicken Salad B Ingredients

3 cups cooked chicken, cubed 1 ½ cups raisins or dried cranberries 3 celery stalks, chopped ½ cup apple peeled and diced 2/3 cup mayonnaise 2 tbsp. lemon juice or apple cider vinegar Salt and pepper to taste ½ cup any nuts or sunflower seeds Lettuce

In a large bowl mix mayonnaise, salt, pepper and lemon juice Add chicken, raisins apples, and celery. Mix well. Before serving, mix in nuts and serve on a bed of lettuce leaves.

Lima Bean Chicken Salad

3-4 cups cooked chicken, coarsely diced 1 onion, chopped 1 can lima beans (drained) 4 cooked potatoes, sliced 2 tomatoes, sliced 1 tsp. sugar 1 can corn, drained 4 tbsp. oil 3-4 cups chicken soup 2 tsp. crushed garlic Salt, pepper to taste 4-5 tbsp. chopped parsley

Bring chicken soup to a boil. Add sugar, garlic, 1tsp of salt and a dash of pepper. Cook for 5 minutes. Add all ingredients (reserve 3 tbsp parsley for garnish), cook for another minute and shut the heat. Taste, correct seasoning. Serve hot or cold.

2. Blintzes

This is such a delicious dish; no one will know its made from leftovers.

Ingredients for blintzes

4 cups flour 4 cups water 6 eggs 2 tbsp. oil Salt and pepper Oil to coat pan when frying

Put flour in a bowl and add water, eggs, oil, and spices. Mix well with a metal whisk. The consistency should be like buttermilk. Fill a ladleful of batter and pour in only enough to coat the bottom of a heated and greased frying pan. Tilt the batter in the frying pan until the blintz is as thin as possible. Flip over when the surface looks dry. Fry for an additional minute, then slide out onto a plate. Sometimes the first 2-3 blintzes will not come out perfect, that’s because the frying pan is not hot enough, don’t be discouraged just continue. In between blintzes use a piece of paper towel to dip in oil and grease the frying pan.

Yields about 3 dozen blintzes.

Tip: For Pesach use the same batter substituting potato starch for flour. These blintzes can be cut thin and used as noodles for the soup or served with the following filling.

Ingredients for chicken filling

6 chicken quarters (preferably bottoms) 2 cups drained fried onions. Salt and pepper, to taste.

Strip chicken off the bone and cut into very small pieces. (You can use a food processor for a few seconds, but it tastes better cut with a knife.) Make sure any bits of bone are removed. Add in the fried onions and seasoning. Mix and taste.

Put about 4 tbsp of the mixture near one edge of each blintz. Fold over both sides and roll lengthwise, to the other edge. Line up in a 9 x 13 pan.

Ingredient for sauce

4 tbsp flour 6 tbsp oil 4 tbsp mushroom soup mix Salt pepper to taste 4 cups cold water

Before starting, prepare the water and keep it near the stove. In a pot, mix first four ingredients very well. Turn heat to high and keep stirring until mixture turns light brown. Make sure it’s not too dark. (If you burn it, start all over again.) Once it’s the right color pour in all the water and keep mixing until fully incorporated and there are no lumps. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until thick sauce forms. Pour over blintzes. At this point you can put the pan in the freezer to reheat later or place in 250° until thoroughly heated and ready to serve.

Tip: Cover the saucepot if you are not planning to use sauce right away. Put a piece of saran wrap on top of sauce to prevent forming a crust.

3) Chicken in Phyllo or Pastry Dough

These recipes are prepared with the blintz filling above.

For Phyllo dough- brush each leaf with oil or spray. Stack them up. Put 4 leaves folded into cupcake shaped baking pan or ramekins. Fill with the chicken mixture, bring up corners of phyllo dough, twist them together and bake for about 30 minutes.

Instead of individual portions you can use up the whole pack of the Phyllo dough. Separate the leaves. Brush each with a little oil and stack them one on top of the other. Fill one side of the stacked up dough with the filling, fold in edges and roll up jelly-roll fashion. Place on a greased baking pan. Brush with egg-wash and bake at 350° for 20-30 minutes or until top is very light brown. Serve immediately.

For chicken in pastry dough – roll out defrosted dough, fill one side with the chicken mixture and roll up jelly-roll fashion. Brush top with egg wash and bake for an hour at 350°.

This recipe can also be made with bourekas dough.

4) Mixed in Letcho

Letcho is a very popular dish in my house. I prepare it when I cook for Shabbos and keep it in the refrigerator, covered, for the week’s consumption. I usually cook it in a pareve pot so I can use it in a variety of ways: as a sauce for pasta, added to an omelet, or mixed with other cooked vegetables, in a vegetable kugel or soup.

TIP: Can be doubled and tripled, but never double or triple the spices. They have to be added to taste.

Ingredients:

2 tbsp tomato paste or 1/3 cup tomato sauce 2 tbsp sugar Salt, Pepper Garlic or garlic powder 4 onions, cut small 4 carrots, grated 4 peppers, cut small Oil for frying Peppers can be used in every color

Start by frying onions until light brown then drain in a sieve. In a saucepan, put drained onions with carrots and peppers. Cook on medium flame, stirring occasionally for 10-15 minutes. Add tomatoes, tomato paste or tomato sauce, sugar and salt, pepper and garlic and cook for another 10 minutes.

When using with leftovers add bite-sized chicken pieces, in a 1 to 1 ratio with the letcho. Reheat and enjoy.

5) Mixed with Potatoes

Here is a recipe that has no specific amounts. Use what you have at home and your own creativity. Taste often. A little more or less of any ingredient won’t ruin the results.

Carefully cube the cooked potatoes. Add leftover chicken, cubed. Add 2 tbsp or more of fried onions, salt and pepper to taste, and presto you have a new main dish.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Simple Home Cooking”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
John Kerry
Entire Israeli Cabinet Rejects Kerry’s Proposed Ceasefire, Talks Continue
Latest Sections Stories
Respler-072514

The real solution to bullying is to empower the bullied child.

Schonfeld-logo1

Time outs increases compliance and positive behavior far more than other forms of discipline

Schild-Edwin

Interestingly, sometimes people who have a very high self-awareness may experience intense reactions to circumstances that others might respond to more mildly.

“You Touro graduates are automatically soldiers in [Israel’s] struggle, and we count on you,” Rothstein told the graduates.

The lemonana was something else. Never had we seen a green drink look so enticing.

On his marriage, he wrote: “This is what I believe: something of the core, of the essence of this meaningful and life-affirming Judaism will not be absent from our home” (1882).

With the recent kidnapping by the Hamas and the barbaric murder of three children – Gilad Shaar, Eyal Yifrach and Naftali Frankel, we believe that the best answer to honor the memory of those murdered is to continue building those very communities – large and small – that our enemies are trying to destroy.

Written entirely through Frayda’s eyes, the reader is drawn by her unassuming personality.

Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed.

While Lipman comes from an ultra-Orthodox background and is an Orthodox rabbi, he offers a breath of fresh air when he suggests that “polarization caused by extremism and isolationism in the religious community may be the greatest internal threat to the future of the Jewish people”

The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten defines a mentch as “someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character.”

Certainly today’s communication via e-mail, Facebook, Twitter and the like, including the ubiquitous Whatsapp, has reduced the need to talk with people and communicate at length.

More Articles from Yaffa Fruchter
Stuffed Cabbage

When cooking early for Pesach I always start with foods that require patience and attention, which we have in short supply as Yom Tov gets closer.

Fruchter-Cooking-logo

The holidays are upon us which means lots of food. So, what to do with all those leftovers? Here are some creative ideas.

As we mentioned last time, chicken or meat leftovers can be used in a variety of ways. First, you have to evaluate how much food is available and then with easy planning you can calculate how many family meals can be prepared from it. The following are some wonderful suggestions for meals.

Welcome to Part III – what to do with the cooked chicken. Our job is to rehydrate it, change the way it looks, and, at times, hide it using dough, eggs, mayonnaise, or sauce. I have found that making up fancy names for the dish not only adds flair, but will help your family know what to ask for next time. Unless otherwise stated these recipes serve 4-6 people. (Note: Though we use the word chicken – each recipe works just as well with meat or turkey.)

Welcome back to Simple Home Cooking. Last time we focused on making a large pot of chicken soup. This week, as promised, we will discuss how to use all the cooked vegetables from the soup to create many dishes.

This column will focus on making cooking easy and simple. We begin with a perennial favorite dish – Chicken Soup.

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/simple-home-cooking-2/2012/03/26/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: