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July 30, 2014 /
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘air strike’

IAF Retaliation Air Strike Kills 10 Syrian Soldiers

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

Air strikes by the Israeli Air Forces left 10 Syrian soldiers dead, according to the UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The strikes came in the wake of an attack by the Syrian Army yesterday that killed a 13 year old Israeli boy and wounded three Israeli civilians, including the boy’s father.

At least two tanks and two artillery batteries were destroyed in the Israeli air strike. Nine missiles were fired by Israeli jet fighters in the attack, the IDF said in a statement to media. “The IDF targeted nine Syrian army positions in response to the earlier attack that originated in Syria killing an Israeli teenager and injuring two other Israeli civilians,” an army spokesperson said.

The Israelis included two contractors who were working on the security fence in the Golan Heights on Israel’s northern border at the time of the attack. The attack occurred near Tel Hazeka, just south of Kuneitra, near the central Golan Heights.

Israeli tanks returned fire shortly after the civilians were wounded, aiming at Kuneitra, which is under Syria’s control.

Ya’alon: ‘We Won’t Ignore the Fire’

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Israel will not ignore attacks from Gaza regardless of the views of the international community – or the United States, warned Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon on Thursday.

Ya’alon told media, “We will not ignore the fire, or the attempted attacks whose purpose is to disrupt the lives of our citizens living in the south and to harm our forces.

“We will pursue and lay our hands on whoever threatens us,” the defense minister said.

“We will know how to act whenever and wherever necessary to thwart any attempts by terrorist forces in Gaza to strike Israeli citizens, just as we did last night.”

On Wednesday night, 33-year-old Gaza-based global jihad terrorist Mahmad Awar, a resident of Beit Lahia, was eliminated in a joint Shin Bet-Israel Air Force operation.

The strike followed a rocket attack on southern Israel earlier in the day.

The terrorist was killed in a surgical air strike with a missile fired at him while he was riding a motorcycle. A companion, 30-year-old Muhamed Ahmed – also of Beit Lahia — was also killed, and a third, Hamada Hassan, was injured.

In his “day job,” Awar worked as a Hamas ‘police officer’ but he was also responsible for firing numerous rockets at southern Israel. At the time of his death, Awar was plotting to shoot down an IDF helicopter with an anti-aircraft missile, according to a report by Rotternik. The threat was serious enough to warrant a pre-emptive strike by the military.

Most recently, Awar had been involved in a rocket attack on the southern Israeli city of Sderot during the Jewish holiday of Passover.

“This terror infrastructure is a violent and extremist Salafi cell which has carried out several rocket attacks and has attempted to implement diverse terror attacks against Israel, as well as attempts to target a helicopter,” the IDF Spokesperson’s Office explained. “The pre-emptive strike was intended to prevent Awar from executing further attacks he had planned against Israel.”

4 Terrorists killed, 7 Injured in Egyptian Army Raid in the Sinai

Sunday, August 11th, 2013

At least four terrorists were killed and seven others injured on Saturday in an air strike of the Egyptian army in north Sinai, on Israel’s border, a local security source told Xinhua.

“The air strike targeted a house, a hut and a car in the village of al-Toma near Sheikh Zewaid city in North Sinai along with more that 10 rockets, while Jihadists replied with heavy artillery but in vain,” the source said.

Military spokesman Colonel Ahmed Mohamed Ali said Saturday that the armed forces attacked a terrorist group planning to launch attacks against army, police and civilians in North Sinai.

Ali said in a statement on his social network page that the terrorist group included members who were involved in the killing of 16 Egyptian soldiers in Rafah city in August 2012 and others involved in kidnapping seven Egyptian soldiers in May.

On Friday, two Egyptian military helicopters struck a rocket base of Jihadist militants in Rafah city in north Sinai.

Air Strike in Syria: The Opening Move?

Monday, February 4th, 2013

If, as international media reports say, Israel was indeed behind last week’s air strikes in Syria, it can be assumed that the attack was the opening move in a longer-term strategy to contain quickly-developing threats emerging from Syria, as well as the broader Iran-Hezbollah axis.

The ball is now in the court of Syrian president Bashar Assad and his allies in Beirut and Tehran. If they attempt further weapons transfers to Hezbollah, more air strikes can be expected – a development that will result in a wider conflict.

Iran is also releasing threats of serious retaliation against Israel, a threat which, if realized, could easily lead to a regional escalation. Days before the airstrikes, Iran warned that it would view any attack on Syria as an attack on itself.

For months, Israel has said that it would not allow strategic, advanced Syrian weapons – be they game-changing missiles or chemical weapons – to fall into the hands of Hezbollah or Al-Qaeda-affiliated elements.

Israel has remained mum over the strike, and little reliable information has surfaced over what targets were struck, but reports citing Western intelligence officials said a convoy carrying advanced SA-17 Syrian anti-aircraft missiles were the target.

The SA-17 system in Hezbollah’s possession would limit the IAF’s ability to carry out vital sorties over Lebanon, whether for reconnaissance, or to attack Hezbollah targets in a future conflict.

Within days of the air strikes, Syrian state media said the target was a military research center near Damascus that carried out work aimed at “raising the level of resistance and self-defense.”

It is entirely possible that both a “research center” and an arms convoy were struck.

Syria’s vague description of the center fits well with a weapons proliferation organization known as the Scientific Studies and Research Center (better known by its French acronym, CERS).

CERS is a Syrian state organization responsible for developing biological and chemical weapons, missiles, and transferring weapons to Hezbollah and Hamas.

In the past, Israel’s former head of the National Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Bureau, Brig.-Gen. (res.) Nitzan Nuriel called on the international community to warn Syria that CERS “will be demolished” if it continues arming terrorist organizations.

According to open source intelligence reports, CERS developed ricin-based chemical weapons. The center was designated as an illegal weapons proliferator by former President George Bush and the U.S. Treasury.

On Saturday, Syrian state TV released footage showing wreckage from the air strikes.

The images appear to have inadvertently verified reports of an arms convoy being the target, as they showed large military trucks that were destroyed in the attack – vehicles that resemble trucks designed to transport anti-aircraft systems.

Since the attack, Iran has led the way in issuing threats to respond. Senior Iranian defense and regime officials have said that the attack will “have consequences for Tel Aviv,” and that a Syrian counterattack will “send Israel into a coma.”

Assad limited himself to condemning Israel as a destabilizer of Syria, and a vague statement saying that Damascus can “confront current threats and aggression against it.”

All parties concerned are aware of the fact that the Assad regime is fighting for its life, and will seek to avoid opening a second front against Israel. Any direct attack on Israel by Syria endangers Assad’s immediate survivability.

On the other hand, Iran’s threats cannot be ignored, and the possibility of retribution was factored in before taking the decision to launch the air strikes.

Iran and Hezbollah could activate terrorist cells abroad to attack overseas Israeli interests. Alternatively, terrorists acting on their behalf could fire missiles at Israel from Syrian or Lebanese territory.

It would be safe to assume that the IDF is on its highest alert for such developments.

Despite the escalated tensions, Jerusalem is projecting a business-as-usual message. Defense Minister Ehud Barak travelled to Germany for an international security conference two days after the air strikes, and IDF Chief of Staff, Lt.-Gen. Benny Gantz, landed in Washington on Sunday for talks with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey.

Whatever happens next, last Wednesday’s air strikes mark a watershed in the gradual breakdown of the Syrian state, and send an unmistakable message: That strategic weapons proliferation will not be tolerated, whatever the price.

Russia: Air Strike Unacceptable, No Matter the Reason

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Russia is expressing concern about an air strike by Israeli warplanes inside Syria, which targeted either a “scientific” facility outside the Syrian capital, Damascus, on Wednesday, (according to Syrian reports), or a convoy of anti-aircraft missiles on its way to a Hezbollah base (according to Western reports). This development comes amid rising international fear that President Bashar Assad is about to lose control of his nation’s stockpiles of chemical and advanced weapons.

The Russian Foreign Ministry has stated that such action, if confirmed, amounts to “unprovoked attacks” against a sovereign nation, in violation of the United Nations charter.

If the reports of “unprovoked strikes” hitting a sovereign country’s territory are confirmed, this would constitute a violation of fundamental United Nations principles, the Foreign Ministry said.

Such attacks are ”unacceptable, no matter where their motivations lie,” the Foreign Ministry added.

There are fears that the Israeli strike could draw others into the Syrian conflict. Iran, Syria’s close ally, said this week that any foreign attack against Syria would be regarded as an attack on Iran.

Differing accounts of the Wednesday air strike have emerged, with Syrian authorities saying Israeli jets fired on a military research facility near Damascus, killing two people.

The conflicting reports could not be resolved or independently confirmed by early Thursday and it remains unclear whether one or two separate strikes occurred. Israel refused to comment on Wednesday.

A statement from Syria’s military command says the strike followed months of “botched attempts” to seize control of the facility by “terrorist groups” – the government’s label for rebels trying to topple President al-Assad. The Israeli pilots are said to have flown into Syria at low altitude, to evade detection.

A Western official who spoke on condition of anonymity told the LA Times that the air strike hit a truck convoy believed to be carrying antiaircraft weapons for Hezbollah terrorists across the border, in Lebanon. The shipment was thought to have included Russian SA-17 missiles, the official said.

These weapons in the hands of the Islamic group could weaken Israel’s regional military power and curb its ability to launch air strikes in Lebanon.

In addition to chemical weapons, Israeli officials have been particularly worried about Syria’s stockpile of SA-17 antiaircraft missiles.

“The initial speculation was about chemical weapons, but Israel is deeply concerned about Hezbollah acquiring this kind of advanced antiaircraft missile,” said Jonathan Spyer, a senior research fellow at the Center for Global Research in International Affairs in Herzliya, Israel. “It would transform Hezbollah’s game and potentially end Israel’s air superiority over Lebanon. This is entirely about Hezbollah, not about Syria.”

In March 2012, Haaretz reported that Syria had supplied Hezbollah with advanced Russian-made anti-aircraft missile systems and was training operators how to use them,.

In 2007, Israel carried out an air raid on Syria’s nuclear reactor site.

The Russia Foreign Ministry also called on for peaceful dialogue without foreign influence in Syria, where over 60,000 have died according to the UN in almost two years of civil war.

In recent weeks, Israeli officials have warned that they will not tolerate any transfer of Syrian weapons to militants such as Hezbollah.

The former head of the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, Amnon Sofin, says Israel’s greatest concern is that Syrian chemical weapons could come under control of Hezbollah terrorists dug in along the Lebanese border.

Sofin told reporters Wednesday that Hezbollah already has rockets and launchers and there are fears that such missiles could be fitted to carry chemical warheads.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/russia-air-strike-unacceptable-no-matter-the-reason/2013/01/31/

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