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March 30, 2015 / 10 Nisan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘livni’

Labor (or Whatever They Call Themselves) Forms Their Knesset List [election]

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

The results from the Labor party (or whatever they are calling themselves today, depending on their audience) primary results are in, and the following is their initial list.

Three of the top 4 spots are filled by women.

Tzipi Livni gets to select of few candidates from her former Hatnua party for reserved positions on the Labor list, though since almost all of her fellow Hatnua party members have quit she may have to look a little further afield. Presumably one of her spots will go to Amir Peretz, who used to be in the Labor party.

As Herzog and Livni were not actually running, Shelly Yechimovich was voted the most popular person in the party.

1) Yitzchak Herzog
2) Tzipi Livni
3) Shelly Yechimovich
4) Stav Shapir
5) Itzik Shmuli
6) Amar Bar-Lev
7) Hilik Bar
8) Reverved for Hatnua (Amir Peretz)
9) Merav Michaeli
10) Eitan Cabel
11) Reserved
12) Arel Margalit
13) Miki Rozenthal
14) Revital Swed
15) Dani Atar
16) Reserved for Hatnua (Manuel Trajtenberb)
17) Zohir Bahalul
18) Eitan Broshi
19) Michal Biran
20) Nachman Shai
21) Reserved for Hatnua
22) Ayelet Nachmias Varbin
23) Yossi Yona
24) Reserved for Hatnua
25) Reserved for Hatnua

Latest Poll: Likud Back on Top, Arabs Take 4th Place

Friday, January 9th, 2015

In the latest poll, taken by Maariv-Walla, we have the following results:

Likud (Netanyahu): 25

Labor (Herzog-Livni): 24

Bayit Yehudi (Bennett): 15

Arab List: 11

Kulanu (Kachlon): 10

Yesh Atid (Lapid): 9

UTJ (Litzman-Gafni): 8

Shas (Deri): 6

Meretz (Gal-on): 6

Yisrael Beiteinu (Liberman): 6 In the latest poll the Likud is now back on top. Due to their unification, in response to the raised electoral threshold, the united Arab list is likely to become the 4th largest party in the Knesset, though it still remains one of the smaller parties.

Eli Yishai just barely keeps on missing the electoral threshold.

Deri is expected to announce next week that his permanent exit from politics or as head of the Shas party is over, and he’s retaking the reins of the Shas party.

Unless one of the two larger parties can break away and get higher numbers, we still see this ongoing deadlock situation, where everyone is reliant on the smaller parties to form a coalition, is its possible to form a coalition at all.

If Labor and Likud form a national unity government, that will actually provide them a wide range of partners, of course, the government will be even worse than the last one.

With neither Kachlon, Shas, UTJ or Yisrael Beiteinu swearing allegiance to a right-wing coalition, everything is up for grabs.

It appears, in fact, that Labor would have an easier time to form a coalition than Likud with these numbers.

In a second question asked:  between Benjamin Netanyahu and Yitzchak Herzog, 50% believe that Netanyahu is better suited to be Prime Minister, while 25% believe Herzog is better suited for the task.

Livni Feints Right, Liberman Fumbles, and Everyone Thinks It’s Purim

Sunday, December 14th, 2014

There’s something appropriate that the upcoming Israeli elections are being held so soon after the Purim holiday.

I would venture to say it’s the only explanation for the mishaps, mistakes, and clown-like behavior.

Let’s start with Tzipi Livni (Hatnua).

The polls showed that Livni was unlikely to pass the electoral threshold, yet both Yair Lapid (Yesh Atid) and Yitzchak Herzog (Labor) courted and chased after Livni as if she was the last girl on Earth.

Like King Achashverosh of Shushan, Herzog offered Livni half his kingdom, though unlike Achahverosh, Herzog doesn’t actually have a kingdom to offer, but then again, Livni doesn’t have anything to offer in return either.

And when these two sycophants agreed to merge with one another (to the dismay of most of the MKs in the Labor party), Livni and Herzog’s “brilliant” campaign strategy to gain votes was to change the merged party’s name into “The Zionist Camp”, a name selected solely as an attempt to outwit the campaign slogans of their competitors and the Right – and not because it has much connection to reality.

(But that’s typical of the Left, hijacking normal words and phrases, corrupting them so badly they can no longer be used in their proper context – just look how they’ve corrupted the term “Freedom of Speech” — now it means shutting down newspapers.)

The two can only hope they don’t confuse and turn off their Left-wing voters who don’t want to vote for the Zionist camp.

And then we have Aryeh Deri. Like on Purim, Deri is drunk on power.

Deri is so afraid of Eli Yishai, as Yishai is considered the better, more honest, the more popular, and the more capable politician, that Deri did everything to push Yishai down and out – even though polls showed that Shas with Yishai at its head would win 2 seats more than Shas with Deri in charge.

As a result, Shas is likely to crash, and whatever new party Yishai forms will do well – which is good, because we know where Yishai stands and what he’s capable of, and his record doesn’t include jail time.

And then we have our friends in Bayit Yehudi – both sides standing up so hard for their principles that they’re just going to split the party that has the potential to become the second largest in the Knesset.

It’s right out of a Purim Shpiel, or maybe just a Greek tragedy.

And finally, there’s Avigdor Liberman.

Yes, Avigdor. The man who claims he is the most responsible adult in the room.

The man, who after the 2009 election, disappeared overseas for days, right in the middle of the February coalition negotiations, forgetting his cell phone at home, and leaving the country stuck in neutral, as he played power games and kingmaker with Netanyahu and Livni.

And yes, here is Mr. Responsible Adult, once again, playing the same childish games.

Once again Liberman won’t say if he will support the Right or Left. In fact he came out yesterday and explicitly said he might very well support Livni and Herzog for Prime Minister.

It sounded earily similar to what Liberman told Radio Kol Yisrael in 2009 (via A7), before disappearing:

“Our position is already clear and I know exactly what I am going to tell President Shimon Peres. In order to know whom we are going to recommend, we will wait six more days. I think it is too early and there is no point saying whom we support. I have met with both Livni and Netanyahu and with additional people in the political system but my position is already clear and solid. When we go to the President we will say very clear things.”

PM Netanyahu Addresses Nation on New Elections in Kickoff Campaign Speech

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

PM Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to the nation on Tuesday evening to explain his decision to fire Ministers Tzipi Livni and Yair Lapid and call for new elections.

Netanyahu explained that it is impossible to run the country under the current conditions, where ministers inside the government are working to undermine their own government and agreed upon coalition policies and decision. He then gave specific examples of how Lapid and Livni went behind the backs of the coalition, such as when Livni met with Palestinian Authority officials while overseas following the PA’s forming a unity government with Hamas, which was against the government’s decision.

Netanyahu said, “I will not allow for a government where Government Ministers attack the Government from within.”

Netanyahu also blamed the fact that the Likud party did not receive enough mandates, making the government vulnerable to all of Lapid’s and Livni’s actions and games.

Using very strong language, Netanyahu described Livni and Lapid’s activities as a “putsch”.

Netanyahu said Israel needs new elections so he can form a large, unified and stable government.

He compared everything his previous government accomplished, to what this one was incapable of doing, and for good measure added that Lapid failed as Finance Minister.

The bottom line is that this was Netanyahu’s kickoff campaign speech, and his message was that only a large Likud can form a stable government.

Un-Caged Knesset Beasts Claw Each other as Election Bait

Monday, November 17th, 2014

Virtually every Knesset party went wild Monday to claw the coalition government to near-death, leaving enough oxygen for resuscitation before forcing elections that, if held, should focus on blaming all the beasts for leaving their cages.

Israel’s establishment media, especially the center-left electronic and print outlets, always use a day of quiet from riots and rocket attacks to whip up the winds to blow apart the collation headed by Binyamin Netanyahu, the Prime Minister that it hates because he is so successful.

The coalition’s main partners are the Likud, headed by Netanyahu; Jewish Home, headed by Naftali Bennett; Yisrael Beitenu, headed by Avigdor Lieberman; Yesh Atid, headed by Yair Lapid; and HaTnua, headed by Tzipi Livni.

Not one of the parties really loves the other, and more accurately, everyone hates each other. Bennett and Lapid started out the coalition as the oddest of odd couples, but its life span was pre-destined to be short.

Lieberman for years has said that he will be Prime Minister one day, and Netanyahu looks over his shoulder so often that he is under constant medical treatment for a stiff neck.

Bennett, the most unseasoned of them all, swings back and forth from tree to tree, depending on whether he wants to please the settlers or Lapid’s voters.

Livni, whose party has only six seats in the Knesset and which will barely squeak into the next Knesset, according to polls, throws around borrowed weight that hides her hapless political performance and destiny.

In the background, the Haredi parties are breathing fire through their nostrils, begging to be begged to help Netanyahu form a new coalition or possibly Lapid to form an alternative coalition.

Don’t worry. The lion is not about lie down with the sheep.

Left-wing Meretz and center-left Labor want new elections because they have nothing to gain by their somewhat weak standing as opposition parties that roar like a mouse.

So will new elections be held soon?

Here are three of several rules in Israeli politics:

First, there are no rules, even the one that says that there are no rules.

Secondly, if elections were held every time the media reports that a coalition will not survive, Israelis would be going to polls twice a week.

Thirdly, since only Netanyahu, Bennett and Lieberman probably would gain from new elections, the beasts probably will be back in their cages by next week, if not by this evening.

It is questionable whether the issues are the reason for the current crisis or whether they simply symbolize the need of the beasts to escape once in a while for exercise.

The big issue for months has been Lapid’s proposal to eliminate the 18 percent Value Added Tax (VAT) on the purchase of new homes. The bill for zero VAT has so many holes in it that it could not pass as Swiss cheese, but no one in Israel likes to confuse the circus – or jungle – with facts.

Under the bill, if it is ever passed into law, the lucky buyer who won’t pay the tax will have had to serve in IDF – 18 months for a man and 12 months for a woman. The home must not be larger than 140 square meters and cost no more than 1.6 million shekels.. The buyers must be employed – bye, bye Haredim – and must not have owned another home in the past 19 years and must be at least 35 years old and have at least one child.

All of these conditions whittle down the potential buyers to a small minority, but the noise over the proposal has been enough to shake the nation to its foundations.

Riots Continue As Israel Tries to Calm Tensions

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Arab communities from the Negev to the Galilee continue to burn as riots over the death of Mohammed Abu Khdeir continue into their sixth day.

Since Abu Khdeir’s body was discovered in the Jerusalem Forest last Wednesday, Israeli across the political and religious spectrum have strongly condemned the murder and have said that the killers would be brought to justice. Prime Minister Netanyahu, Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, Jewish Home leader Naftali Bennet and rabbis from across the religious Zionist spectrum expressed their revulsion at the murder and called for those responsible to be brought to justice.

Netanyahu said there is “no place in Israeli society” for the individuals, apparently Jews, who kidnapped and murdered the Arab teenager,

Justice Minister Tzippi Livni, too, lashed out at the suspects.

“They have stolen our faith that something like this could never happen in our society. They have stolen from us the ability to say that we are not like them, that a Jew could never commit such a brutal, sadistic murder of a child.

“But we will not let them steal our ability to be a nation with ethical and democratic values. We will not let them steal our presence as a country with the rule of law – as Menachem Begin said, “justice is the ultimate authority” – I will not allow them to take this away from us. I pledge that the law enforcement and justice establishments will act in the strictest way possible against anyone who tries to destroy what we have built here – the murderers of Mohammed Abu Khdeir and of Shelly Dadon will be brought to justice. We have had enough!”, Livni said in a statement.

But the wall-to-wall condemnations and pledges for justice did little to douse the flames of violence in Arab communities around the country. Overnight between Sunday and Monday, Arabs clashed with police and Border Police in Arab-majority neighborhoods in Jerusalem, Bedouin towns in the Negev and Israeli Arab towns in the Galilee.

In Shchem, Arab rioters tried to burn Kever Yosef, a holy site to Muslims as well as Jews, but were repelled by Palestinian Authority security forces.

In the Galilee, routes 65 and 70 have been closed on-and-off for several days due to violence.  Dozens of people have been arrested in Tamra and Nazareth.

In the south, masked Arabs threw stones at passing cars outside the Jewish town of Omer, north of Beer Sheva. In addition, clashes were reported at Ar’ara, Tel Sheva, Lakia and Khoura.

Responding to the riots, Justice Minister Livni called on Jewish and Arab leaders to calm tensions.

“This is the time for the national and local leadership – in Israel, the Palestinian Authority and every town and village – to show responsibility, to rise to the call of this difficult hour to ramp down the flames and to find the way to live here,” Livni said.

Demanding a Jewish State

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/demanding-a-jewish-state/2014/06/10/

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