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September 21, 2014 / 26 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘sukkot’

Police Bar Jews from Holiday Visit to Temple Mount

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Jerusalem police once again have prohibited Jews from visiting the Temple Mount because of security officials’ unintended admission that they cannot or do not want to deal with violent Arabs.

Officially, police say that they blocked the planned visit of hundreds of Jews to the holy site on Tuesday, the sixth day of the Sukkot holiday, because of intelligence information that Arab protesters would be violently upset, which is par for the course when Jews try to ascend the Temple Mount.

Among those barred on Tuesday was Jewish Home Knesset Member Shuli Moalem-Refaeli as well as busloads of school children.

The Temple Mount remained open for Muslims, of course.

Sukkot Hike Raises Money for Camp Koby

Monday, September 23rd, 2013
Sukkot hike raises money for Camp Koby.

Sukkot hike raises money for Camp Koby.

More than 60 people took part in a special one day Kilometers for Koby Sukkot hike along the Israel Trail and the Burma Road this week to help raise funds for Camp Koby, established in memory of terror teenage victim Koby Mandell.

He and a friend were killed nearly 13 years ago in a terrorist attack while hiking near their home in Tekoa, east of Efrat in Gush Etzion. The tragedy spurred his parents, Rabbi Seth and Sherri Mandell, to create The Koby Mandell Foundation to benefit the families of others who have lost loved ones to terror and other tragic circumstances. The   hike began at Neve Shalom and ended in Park Eshtaol and included both Israelis and American tourists.

Birkat Cohanim

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

On Sunday morning, the traditional Birkat Cohanim, Blessing of the Priests, was held in the Kotel plaza. The Kotel was packed.

.Birkat Cohanim

 

 

 

.Shacharit on Sukkot at the Kotel

 

 

 

.Priestly Blessing at the Kotel

 

Next year on the Temple Mount.

Jewish Agency Seeks ‘Number One Sukkah in the World’

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

The Jewish Agency for Israel has launched a competition to find the Number One Sukkah in the World.

The competition, dubbed “Sukkathon 2013,” invites Jewish individuals and communities around the world to submit photos of their sukkahs for consideration by a panel of judges. The judges include the South African-Israeli architect Pam Davidson, British art critic and art history lecturer Julia Weiner, and artist Betina Schneid, a recent immigrant to Israel from Brazil, who has participated in The Jewish Agency’s Ulpan Etzion program in Jerusalem.

Photo submissions will be welcomed until Monday, September 23, and the winner will be announced on the Hoshana Rabba festival da, the last day of Sukkot, this, Wednesday.

As part of the Sukkathon, children from the Jewish Agency’s Ye’elim Immigrant Absorption Center in Be’er Sheva have submitted a photo of themselves (above) in the absorption center sukkah, which they helped build and decorate.  Hundreds of new immigrants living in the absorption center are preparing to celebrate their first Sukkot in Israel, as are thousands of other immigrants at Jewish Agency absorption centers around Israel.  Some 350 individuals reside in Ye’elim, including some 130 children.

WoW Miss their Chance for Equality at Kotel Priestly Blessing

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

Tens of thousands of Jews prayed at the Western Wall Sunday, the fourth day of Sukkot, and received the traditional priestly blessing of dozens of Kohenim, but no Women of the Wall tried to join.

Kohenim are of the priestly tribe traced to the Biblical High Priest Aaron.

The Women of the Wall have campaigned vigorously the past year to pressure for the same religious standing of men to read from a Torah scroll and wear tefillin at the Western Wall. They have succeeded in winning the right to pray as they wish at the southern section of the Western Wall, known as Robinson’s Arch and not adjacent to the more widely-known section of the Wall.

So why didn’t they try to prove again that “equal” mean the “same” and presume they are Kohenim. Don’t Reform Jews deserve their blessing?

The Reform movement generally maintains a policy of “equality” and rejects the distinctions between Kohenim and other Israeli tribes, but some Reform and Conservative prayer groups allow the daughter of a Kohen to perform the Priestly Blessing.

The same prayer groups also call a daughter of a Kohen to the reading of the Torah, in place of the traditional recognition of a Kohen for the Torah portion that is chanted in Israel on the Sabbath, holidays, Rosh Chodesh (the beginning of the month and on Mondays and Thursdays.

The Kohenim were active in sacrifices in the Holy Temples, and Reform and Conservative thought concludes that since the Temples have been destroyed and there are no sacrifices today, the designation of a Kohen is either out of date or is not restricted to men. The Conservative movement is split with two opposing opinions on whether a daughter of a Kohen can perform the Priestly Blessing.

Most Reform and Conservative congregations omit the Priestly Blessing, which in Orthodox congregations in the Diaspora are performed only on the three festivals of Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot. The blessing is recited toward the end of the additional Musaf prayers. Reform Jews usually don’t bother themselves with praying too much, and they delete Musaf.

Reform Rabbi Jeffrey W. Goldwasser posted on a website “More liberal communities, those that insist on thorough gender equality, do not observe the distinction of Kohanim and Levi’im at all.”

Reform Jews, with their 11th Commandment of equality, declare that all Jews are equal in their functions as Jews. All of us are the same. Everyone is a priest, everyone can wear tefillin, everyone can read from the Torah, and everyone can do pretty much as he or she pleases.

That begs one question: If all are equal, if Jewish law rejects the Torah as the living law of today, and if every Jew can understand the Torah as he wants, why is there such a thing as a Reform “rabbi”?

So much for equality.

Surviving Yom Kippur in Israel and Building a Sukkah in The Land

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai and Malkah kick off this week’s show discussing surviving Yom Kippur in Israel and feeling cleansed after the fast. They move on and end discussing the construction of the Fliesher family Sukkah and how they are going to combine tradition and modern life by moving their computers into the Sukkah.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Tax Authorities Raid Lulav and Etrog Street Vendors

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Israeli tax official surprised hundreds of Lulav and Etrog vendors around the country on Monday when they began a secret operation to determine if the sellers were reporting their sales, providing receipts, and paying taxes on revenues from their booths.

Vendors report that they don’t remember a raid like this ever happening before.

Lulav and Etrog sales are primarily a cash business, and they are sold by vendors, often teenagers, who set up tables and booths on streets throughout Israel before the Sukkot holiday. The business itself is more complicated with a group importers and distribution centers providing the majority of the temporary street vendors with their products.

Sukkot’s Lulav and Etrog sales is a multi-millions dollar industry.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/tax-authorities-surprise-lulav-and-etrog-street-vendors/2013/09/17/

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