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Muslim women in chains. Is showing this picture racist?

Originally published at Gatestone Institute.

We must face up to it. The Western democracies have a great and serious problem which appears only to be growing: the general public are developing views highly questionable to those in positions of power. Larger and larger swaths of people, when asked their opinion of certain matters, keep coming back with the wrong opinion. Whether it is opposition to the EU in Europe, or to Obamacare in the U.S., or to a hopeless deal with Iran to keep it from producing nuclear weapons, something, surely, must be done about this!

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Take the latest example, a different matter that came to light with a school in Glasgow, Scotland. The institution was recently forced to call in a crack-squad of head-scarf wearing Muslim women to help correct what the school felt was a “racist” view of Islam held by some of their students.

When the school asked the pupils to say which which words came to mind when people talked about Muslims — and the response included “terrorist,” “oppressed,” “a threat” and “scary” — re-educating the pupils was found to be necessary. Some pupils even, outrageously, said “9/11.”

After the BBC and other media promptly picked up this disturbing story and asked what more can be done to “educate” Scottish youngsters, the school apparently corrected this problem.

But what to do about the recognition that problems like these may well be more widespread?

The reaction to the Glasgow story was reminiscent to that which followed the publication of a poll carried out by BBC Radio 1 in June of this year. When it was released in September, it transpired that of 1,000 young people polled, 27% said that they did not trust Muslims, with 44% saying they thought Muslims did not share the same views as the rest of the population. On that occasion, too, the BBC and other media went into overdrive to work out what had gone wrong and how Britain could better “address” the problem that so many people thought this way.

Conversely, when the same poll showed that 15% of young people did not trust Jews, 13% did not trust Buddhists and 12% did not trust Christians, those facts were not deemed figures of significance.

As so often is the case today, a poll is carried out on public opinion and when it turns out that the public have the wrong views on whatever is the Dictate of the Day — the question then is asked, ‘What can people in positions of power do to ensure the public are made to think the right way?’

What is striking, is that despite the attempts to re-educate and otherwise alter the attitudes of the majority of the population, the population continue to understand — in ever larger numbers — that the problems lie not with them but with what is happening around them. As Daniel Pipes pointed out recently, for example, across much of Europe, Islam appears not to be growing as fast as negative perceptions of it.

As Pipes also cited, in Germany last year, a poll revealed that only 7% of Germans associate Islam with “openness, tolerance or respect for human rights.” 64% connect it with violence; 68% with intolerance towards other faiths, and 83% with discrimination against women. A poll in France earlier this year revealed that 67% of people believe Islamic values to be “incompatible with those of French society,” 73% view Islam negatively and 74 % consider it intolerant. If the problem of perception of Islam were limited to Dundee, that would be one thing. But the Dundee schoolchildren clearly perceive something which a growing number of people across Western Europe also perceive — as other people do about other problems surrounding them.

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15 COMMENTS

  1. Excuse me for noticing, but this is happening in countries which condemned apartheid. There have been more killings since Mandela took over than in all the apartheid years since 1948. These people with the swords were some of his best friends. They thrive off slavery and death.

  2. Hiding away the truth will never solve the problem. The second option is also an impossibility. As a spokesman of Islam said in Luton – Muslims are not expected to keep the law of the country in which they live unless it is Shariah law.

  3. In 1984, it was easy to rewrite the truth on a daily basis because there was only one newspaper in town. Perhaps the "re-educators" of Britain should learn from their own utopian novels and take a page from the Chinese by taking control of all forms of information sources. They should first rewrite what is in the Quran, because it's one source of "truth" that certainly doesn't make Muslims look very peaceful. Or they could change the actual truth, like making it sowhen people are beheaded, maple syrup pours out rather than blood or when people blow up, candy spills out rather than guts. Or when a woman is being stoned for getting raped, she….yeah, candy and sweets aren't making that one any less acceptable. It's easier to change the "truth" than to change reality I guess.

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