web analytics
August 28, 2015 / 13 Elul, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Do The Dough!

Somethings-Cooking-logo

Yeast dough is considered one of the most basic but complicated of the dough family. Just think of the first cakes you made – I’m almost sure they weren’t yeast cakes.

But mine were!

As a girl I really had no inkling about “kitchen stuff” until I noticed something interesting. Twice a year my mother would make a cookie and cake Kiddush for our shul to mark the yahrtzeits of my father’s parents who were killed in the Holocaust.

Those cake platters were laden with all sorts of baked goodies – melt-in-your-mouth cakes alongside mouthwatering cookies, professionally made and gone almost as soon as they hit the table. But although Mom prepared quite a variety, I noticed something missing from her overflowing plates. There were none of the fluffy, yeasty kokosh and moon cakes that I especially loved.

“Why don’t you ever make yeast cakes, Mommy?” I wondered aloud.

“Oh, that’s not for me! My yeast dough never seems to rise to my expectations. I’ll just stick to cookie dough.”

Then and there I decided: “Come next Kiddush, there’ll be fantastic, fluffy kokosh cakes on my mother’s cookie platters and I’ll make them!”

So, I practiced that summer on my friends in camp. I was counselor in a small Canadian camp that bunked 120 campers in all. On the 17th of Tammuz and the 9th of Av, when there were no meals served, the cook had the day off and I got the kitchen key!

I was in full reign, preparing bowls of dough rising, waiting to be turned into sizzly cheesy pizzas, chocolaty sweet kokosh cakes and soft, supple onion pitas to “break the fast” on.

Judging from how quickly everything disappeared, I knew I was pretty good at making yeast dough and more importantly, the dough was good to me – it rose to every occasion and never disappointed me.

True to my decision, that year my yeast cakes found a place of honor on mother’s Kiddush platters.

Until today, there’s nothing more gratifying for me than kneading yeast dough. As it rises on my counter, I feel an elation rise within me too. The cakes release their yeasty aroma as they bake, expanding in the heat and in my heart.

To date, I’ve baked tens of thousands challahs, rolls and yeast cakes in hundreds of shapes, sizes and flavors at home, for simchas and in my workshops. Which is good news for those of you suffering from Yeast Dough Phobia. Because over time, I’ve collected quite a few tips for a successful experience in preparing yeast dough.

Of course you could always just run out to your preferred bakery and buy their kokosh cake but in my opinion, nothing can beat the heavenly scent of your yeast cake baking in your kitchen!

All you “knead” to know is a few simple rules like correct temperature, mixing, rising and rolling. Besides, the more you make yeast dough, the better you get the feel for it and the better it will “behave” for you. Hands-on experience is the best teacher around!

For starters, how does your dough grow?

There are two methods for yeast dough rising. 1. The warm method which is most commonly used and 2. The cold method which chefs sometimes prefer.

Here’s how the cold method works:

After the dough is ready, put it into a large plastic bag and tie loosely on top. Refrigerate overnight or up to 3 days. After a few hours, the bag will resemble a blown up balloon. This means the fermentation gases are doing their job (even though they were “left in the cold”).

A few hours before you’re ready to make your yeast cake or rolls, remove the bag of dough from the refrigerator and leave in the bag on your counter until the dough reaches room temperature. Proceed as the recipe instructs.

Here’s a question I received from Sarah about kokosh cake filling:

Q: “Do you have a good chocolate filling for my kokosh cake. Somehow mine always sinks into the dough till it seems as if there’s no filling at all. Do you have a recipe for the “store bought” kind?”

A: The chocolate filling I use for my kokosh cake is easy to make and since it’s made with dry ingredients, easy to “spread.” It imitates the store bought filling in that it’s oozy without oozing out of the roll or into the dough.

About the Author: Mindy Rafalowitz is a recipe developer and food columnist for over 15 years. She has published a best selling cookbook in Hebrew for Pesach and the gluten sensitive. Mindy is making progress on another specialty cookbbok for English readers. For kitchen questions or to purchase a sample recipe booklet at an introductory price, contact Mindy at mitbashelpo@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Do The Dough!”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Efrat Chief Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, formerly from New York.
One-Third of Americans in Israel Live in Judea and Samaria
Latest Sections Stories
Singer-Saul-Jay-logo-NEW

On November 22, 1963, Abraham Zapruder created one of the most famous, and valuable, pieces of film and became forever linked with one of the greatest American national tragedies when he stood with his camera on an elevated concrete abutment as President John F. Kennedy’s motorcade passed through Dealey Plaza in Dallas. Exhibited here is […]

Schonfeld-logo1

“Worrying is carrying tomorrow’s load with today’s strength – carrying two days at once. It is moving into tomorrow ahead of time. Worrying doesn’t empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength.” – Corrie ten Boom I’ve been thinking a lot about worrying. Anxiety is an issue close to my heart – […]

Baim-082115

Don’t be afraid to try something different.

Upon meeting the Zionist delegation, General Wu, a recent convert to Christianity, said, “You are my spiritual brothers.

With the assistance of Mr. Tress, Private Moskowitz tried tirelessly to become an army chaplain.

Dr. Yael Respler is taking a well-deserved vacation this week and asked Eilon Even-Esh to share some thoughts with her readers in her stead.

A dedicated scholar, educator and mother, Dr. Lowy was the guiding light of TCLA since its inception and the entire Touro community mourns her passing.

It’s ironic that when we hear about Arab extremists attacking and killing Jewish settlers, there is quiet from these same left wingers.

It is well known that serving olives with alcoholic drinks enhances their flavor, but you have to know what you’re doing.

All of us wish to act in kind, compassionate and intelligent ways. We all wish to build character.

The doctor said, “Make sure to get a really expensive one. You spend a third of your life in bed.”

More Articles from Mindy Rafalowitz
Something-Cooking-logo

Now that we’re back to chometz, it’s just the right time to give thought to our wellbeing. Who doesn’t want to lose a few bulky matzah-and-potato pounds? Who wouldn’t like to eat smarter and feel better? If you’re like most people I know, these are probably the first things you’d like to address. It’s time […]

Something-Cooking-logo

Until the year I decided to put a stop to all my tremors. I realized that if I wanted my family to experience Pesach and its preparations as uplifting and fulfilling, I’d have to relax and loosen up.

Purim is a fantastic time for fantasies, so I hope you won’t mind my fantasizing about how easy life would be if kids would prefer healthy cuisine over sweets. Imagine waking up to the call of “Mommy, when will my oatmeal be ready?”… As you rush to ladle out the hot unsweetened cereal, you rub […]

Soup could really be a great way to get your kids to eat their veggies on a daily basis, but most kids I know can’t stand “icky things” swimming around in their soup bowl.

I should be pursuing plateaus of pure and holy, but I’m busy delving and developing palatable palates instead.

You’re probably wondering why the greatest advocate of fast and easy preps in the kitchen is talking about layer cakes, right?

“Whole soybeans,” was the answer. “They have all the advantages of soy without being processed with hexane,” she added.

One thing I did know, judging from the urgency in her voice, was that she wanted an explanation fast.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/do-the-dough/2013/06/28/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: