web analytics
July 24, 2014 / 26 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



A Chat With PR Maven Marty Appel


Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Thurman Munson, George Steinbrenner – these are just some of the magic names Marty Appel has dealt with and written about.

 

For more than 40 years Marty has had an ideal view of baseball history and some of its main characters, first in his role in the New York Yankees public relations department and later as an author and head of his own public relations firm.

 

 

Marty Appel as Yankees PR director in the mid-1970s

 

 

I knew Marty from the baseball beat decades ago, had a Shabbat meal with him at last year’s Yankees fantasy camp and visited his bright, tastefully decorated midtown Manhattan office/residence a fly ball away from Central Park.

 

   Cohen: We spent some time together at the Yankees fantasy camp in Tampa. You mentioned that you visited George Steinbrenner in his home office. What did you talk about and how would you define the state of his health?

 

   Appel: He’s quite changed; he used to dominate the conversation, this time I did. But he knew me and we had a nice chat about his early days when he first bought the team. Beyond that, I can’t speculate, not being a physician.

 

   The Yankees hired you to answer Mickey Mantle’s fan mail and you were named public relations director after a couple of years. If memory serves, you were the youngest man to hold that title in the major leagues. How many years did it take you and how long did you hold the title?

 

I went from fan mail clerk to assistant public-relations director in two years, and then three years later to public-relations director. In all my term there was nine years, and then I put in eleven years as the executive producer of their local telecasts.

 

   You left the Yankees prior to the 1977 season. Looking back, are you sorry you didn’t stay through the season as the Yanks won the World Series and you would have earned your first ring?

 

We did get rings for the ’76 American League championship, thank goodness. I would have loved to have won a World Series ring, but I was satisfied with my tenure, during which we returned to the World Series, opened a remodeled stadium, and drew two million fans. All good memories.

 

   You had to deal with many Yankees icons such as Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Whitey Ford and Mickey Mantle. Did some surprise you as being nicer than you expected – or, on the other hand, not as nice?

 

I didn’t have any disappointments with people. I didn’t have a single one of those Yankee legends – I’d add Ellie Howard in there – who didn’t treat me great. A lot of people thought I’d be disappointed by Joe D., but he too was always nice to me. I guess when you are doing PR for a team, the sunny side of your personality is always on display, so I connected well with almost everyone I encountered.

 

   My favorite manager when I started on the baseball beat in the 1970s was Ralph Houk, who managed the Tigers in those years. We had many long conversations in the dugout. But you knew him earlier as a Yankees manager and the head of baseball operations in the front office. What kind of guy was he and why did he leave the Yankees after four decades with the organization?

 

   He left because the new owner [Steinbrenner] wasn’t as “hands off” as he was used to, and he did have the Tigers offer in his pocket when he resigned. We all loved Ralph, he was like the definition of what you’d want a manager to be. It was a sad day when he left, but the fans had turned on him by then, and were blaming him for those mediocre seasons. I guess it was time to go.

 

   You went on to responsible positions and came back to Yankee Stadium as producer of Yankees television broadcasts. Who were your favorite announcers to work with?

 

   I loved the team of Phil Rizzuto, Frank Messer and Bill White. Good men, all of them. Rizzuto really ran the show, I was along for the ride. But that was okay; he was a legend, a terrific guy, and great fun to travel with. Later on, Bobby Murcer was a special part of the team, being a good friend and a skilled announcer as well.

 

   Your latest book, Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain, is your 18th. My favorite, though, is your personal story, which you did in 2001 – Now Pitching for the Yankees. I liked it because I met almost all the people you wrote about and it gave me more insight to their personalities. What was your favorite book and what’s your next project?

 

     I guess if someone gives you a chance to tell your life story, and it’s well received, that’s very flattering stuff, so Now Pitching would get the nod. The Munson bio was a chance to get a “do-over” on his autobiography, which fell short of telling the whole story. I was glad that chance came along. I’m currently writing a full narrative history of the Yankees, 1903 to the present, which will come out in the spring of 2012.

 

   Every time I send my column to The Jewish Press I think of you because of the large picture of Washington Park on your office wall. Washington Park was where the Dodgers played through 1912 prior to Ebbets Field. The site now serves as a Con Edison storage yard but most of the exterior outfield walls still stand and it happens to face the building The Jewish Press operates from. Why a picture of a Brooklyn ballpark and not an old Yankee Stadium view on your wall?

 

I was born in Brooklyn and I just thought it was a great period piece. Not everything in my home is Yankees. I have a C.C. Sabathia hand puppet in an Indians uniform. And … well, you’re right, everything else is Yankees.

 

   You did PR for the defunct Israel Baseball League and it resulted in your first-ever trip to Israel. What did you think of Israel?

 

It was a fast two weeks of intense business operations, launching a league. I stayed in Tel Aviv and took one day to visit Jerusalem, thank goodness. I learned that Israelis take business very seriously, not a lot of humor in their business days. No small talk. We just went and got things done. I’d love to go back sometime when I don’t have a demanding business agenda.

About the Author: The author of 10 books, Irwin Cohen headed a national baseball publication for five years and interviewed the legendary Hank Greenberg. He went on to work for a major league team and became the first Orthodox Jew to earn a World Series ring. He can be reached in his Detroit area dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “A Chat With PR Maven Marty Appel”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Shimon Peres meets with the family of fallen IDF soldier Max Steinberg.
Four Notes on The Situation
Latest Sections Stories
WC-072514-TCLA

“You Touro graduates are automatically soldiers in [Israel’s] struggle, and we count on you,” Rothstein told the graduates.

A-Night-Out-logo

The lemonana was something else. Never had we seen a green drink look so enticing.

Singer-072514

On his marriage, he wrote: “This is what I believe: something of the core, of the essence of this meaningful and life-affirming Judaism will not be absent from our home” (1882).

With the recent kidnapping by the Hamas and the barbaric murder of three children – Gilad Shaar, Eyal Yifrach and Naftali Frankel, we believe that the best answer to honor the memory of those murdered is to continue building those very communities – large and small – that our enemies are trying to destroy.

Written entirely through Frayda’s eyes, the reader is drawn by her unassuming personality.

Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed.

While Lipman comes from an ultra-Orthodox background and is an Orthodox rabbi, he offers a breath of fresh air when he suggests that “polarization caused by extremism and isolationism in the religious community may be the greatest internal threat to the future of the Jewish people”

The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten defines a mentch as “someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character.”

Certainly today’s communication via e-mail, Facebook, Twitter and the like, including the ubiquitous Whatsapp, has reduced the need to talk with people and communicate at length.

These two special women utilized their incredibly painful experience as an opportunity to assist others.

Maybe we don’t have to lose that growth and unity that we have achieved, especially with the situation in Eretz Yisrael right now.

Sleepily, I watched him kissing Mai’s chubby thighs.

I have always insisted that everything that happens to anyone or anything is min Shamayim.

My teachers like me and they tell my parents that I am a great girl with good middos.

More Articles from Irwin Cohen
Baseball-Insider

Zimmer was popular with veteran teammates like Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese and Duke Snider – and with a rookie lefthander named Sandy Koufax.

Baseball-Insider

I’m sure readers noticed those full-page advertisements that ran prior to last month’s meeting about the situation at the Brooklyn home of Rabbi Moshe Tuvia Lieff, rav of Agudas Yisroel Bais Binyomin. Avrohom chaired the even along with his brother Menachem, a prominent askan and the president of Lubicom.

I spoke twice during Pesach. The first topic was the Holocaust and Jewish ballplayers and the second was how I, a frum-from-birth Jew, ended up in major league baseball.

Even if a player reaches the big league level, there’s still no guarantee he’ll remain with one team for long. Former Jewish outfielder Richie Scheinblum comes to mind.

The snow has melted in most parts of the country and here in Florida, where I have my winter dugout in the Orthodox enclave of Century Village in West Palm Beach, I had the opportunity to take in several spring training games.

If you’re visiting spring training sites, Arizona has two advantages – fewer games are rained out and the facilities are much closer to each other than is the case in Florida.

There were 15 Jews in the major leagues during the 2013 season, but only a few from a Jewish mother.

Musial told the taunted Jackie Robinson: “I want you to know that I’m not like many of the other guys on my team.”

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/sports/a-chat-with-pr-maven-marty-appel/2010/07/07/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: