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July 26, 2016 / 20 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Jordan’

Minister Ariel: Liberman’s 2-State Statement Nothing More than ‘Verbal Maneuvering’

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Uri Ariel (Habayit Hayehudi) appeared on journalist Aryeh Golan’s Israel Radio morning show Wednesday in response to the surprising statements—first by the new defense minister Avigdor Liberman (Yisrael Beiteinu) that he was all in favor of the two-state solution, followed by the cooing response of PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas, who appeared eager to get together and chat peace with comrade Yvette.

And so, Aryeh Golan opened: “Mahmoud Abbas is saying if Liberman supports the two-state solution there’s no reason not to meet him. [Ma’alot-Tarshiha Mayor] Shlomo Bohbot [who met with Abbas on Tuesday, along with other Galilee regional council heads] says, I found an amazing man. Lieberman says the wholeness of the nation takes precedence over the wholeness of the land. You hear new voices from both sides regarding a meeting, [renewed] negotiations?”

“We’ve already seen Mr. Liberman speaking this way one time, that way another, presumably in accordance with international pressure and other factors,” Ariel answered. “I would have preferred it to be different, but these are the facts.” He advised: “Talks are not a scary thing. The question is what do we say during the talks.”

Golan: Prime Minister Netanyahu sounded as if he approves the Saudi initiative, ahead of the [Paris] foreign ministers conference Friday.

Ariel: I’ve said it in the past, this is not the position of the government, nor the Likud, nor any authorized political entity.

Golan: The Prime Minster is not authorized enough?

Ariel: He is first among equals. There is no decision at all, not political, not by any party, not national, certainly not in the Knesset. On the contrary, last year MK Yoel Hasson (Zionist Camp) tried to pass the Arab initiative in the Knesset and the Likud rejected it.

“I see here a verbal maneuvering,” Ariel added. “I’m sorry it’s been done, I would have preferred that he [didn’t do it] but for that you have Habayit Hayehudi — why are we here? — To speak the truth.”

Golan: And should the Prime Minister embrace the French initiative? Do you agree with Liberman’s statement (originally made by the late Rv Ovadia Yosef) that the wholeness of the nations takes precedence over the wholeness of the land?

That was Liberman’s signal slogan upon entering office this week: he cares more about national cohesiveness than about territories. That’s usually something politicians say just before making some section of the national whole really miserable (see Gush Katif in a Google search near you).

Ariel: In my opinion the French initiative is totally screwed up at its foundation. It sets an end date [for the talks]. So that the other side can just linger, play for time, until the date arrives and then Israel is to blame. Which is why the PM does not agree with the French initiative. He talks about direct negotiations about which, in this context, he is certainly right, it’s better this way — the way the peace agreements with Jordan and with Egypt were reached, in direct talks between us and the Arabs and not through others.

“As to the statement about the wholeness of the nation — there’s no contradiction here,” Ariel insisted. “It’s comparing two unequal terms, like it’s better to eat spaghetti than to dance the waltz. It’s true, but so what? It doesn’t work this way.”

“We’re about to celebrate Jerusalem Liberation Day on Sunday,” Ariel pointed out. “We’ve been in the territories for 48 years. Jordan had been there only 19 years. The slogan sounds nice, but, again, it’s a verbal maneuver in ever-changing situations.”

So, at least while Habayit Hayehudi is in government, those territories are non-negotiable. Unless you like spaghetti with your waltz.

JNi.Media

Jordan’s New ‘Pro-Israel’ Prime Minister Hani Fawi al-Mulki

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Newly appointed Jordanian Prime Minister Hani Fawzi al-Mulki has been described in the pan-Arab media outlet Al Jazeera as having “strong Israeli ties.”

Jordan’s King Abdullah II dissolved his country’s Parliament by royal decree this past Sunday, and accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Abbdullah Ensour. Veteran politician Hani Mulki was appointed to become Jordan’s new prime minister, and charged by King Abdullah to set up new elections in October.

The decree followed a week of protests that followed an extraordinary parliamentary day (May 22) in which Jordanian legislators had voted during a morning session to exclude Israel from the Jordanian Investment Fund, according to Albawaba. But in the evening session, a re-vote was called, and the majority of parliament members instead voted to allow Israeli involvement. The Jordanian monarch dissolved the parliament at the end of the week.

Former senior government aide Husam Abdallah told Al Jazeera on Monday (May 30) that Mulki will most likely be tasked with bringing together Israel and the Palestinian Authority for final status talks.

“Mulki will be working to bring Palestinians and Israelis to the negotiation table and work to bring a final solution to the Palestinian cause which will most likely be at the expense of the Palestinian people,” he said.

The new prime minister previously chaired the Jordanian government committee that has been responsible for negotiations with Israel over the past 20 years.

Hana Levi Julian

Jordan’s King Dissolves Parliament, Stifles Riots Over Approval of Israeli Investment

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

Jordan’s King Abdullah II dissolved his country’s Parliament by royal decree on Sunday, and accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Abbdullah Ensour.

Reuters reported it was the end of the legislative body’s four-year term. But the move also had the effect of breaking week-long protests, and riots on Friday by hundreds of residents in the ancient city of Petra — a major tourist attraction — where Jordanians allegedly were rampaging over “fraudulent investments,” according to the English-language Jordan Times.

Veteran politician Hani Mulqi was appointed to become Jordan’s new prime minister, and charged by King Abdullah to set up new elections in October.

The decree came barely a week after an extraordinary session in which the Jordanian Parliament voted to allow Israeli companies to invest in the country. At the time, the king endorsed the decision and issued a decree to end the session at the end of last week, according to Albawaba. The vote was considered very controversial and there was widespread public outcry following the session. Specifically, the Jordanian Parliament voted not to exclude Israel from its National Investment Fund.

Originally, last Sunday morning (May 22) Parliament members had voted to exclude Israel from the Jordanian Investment Fund. But in the evening session, a re-vote was called, and the majority of parliament members instead voted to allow Israeli involvement.

“In a particularly shocking turn in the struggle over the new investment law, several vocally pro-Palestine politicians voted in favor of trade with Israel,” Albawaba reported.

“Among them was Rodaina Al Ati, a member of Jordan’s Palestine Committee who has made a name for herself by supporting the Palestinian cause. Jordan’s Arab Progressive Baath Party expelled Al Ati for her vote, and social media users launched a campaign of ridicule and criticism against her.”

The Jordanian Investment Law establishes the Jordan Investment Fund, which oversees development projects and those which foreign funds can invest in. The decision to allow Israel to participate in the fund was seen as a blow to the BDS (boycott, divest and sanctions) movement.

The primary opposition to the monarchy in Jordan is that of the Muslim Brotherhood movement.

However, according to Reuters it was tribal lawmakers who has dominated the last parliament, resisting any change that might have undermined their influence or sabotaged their ability to control the legislative body. The system favors those tribal regions which are sparsely populated and which benefit most from state patronage, and the support of the monarchy, Lebanon’s Daily Star newspaper pointed out.

The reversal of the original decision has provoked outrage in Jordan, inasmuch as it also enables foreign companies to invest in Jordan.

Hana Levi Julian

The Four-State Solution

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

No one who claims to be an advocate of a two-state solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict is really being honest about it.

If they were, they’d admit that a Palestinian state already exists, more than one in fact.

75% of Mandatory Palestine, which was promised for the Jewish state, was ripped away and given to the Hashemite invaders, eventually being renamed Jordan.

Some 80% of Jordan’s citizens self-identify as Palestinian.

So despite the Hashemite occupation and dictatorship, there already exists a fully-functioning Jew-free Palestinian state with a self-identified Palestinian majority.

But put Jordan aside, then there’s Gaza.

100% Arab ruled. 100% self-identified Palestinian population. Zero Jews.

Under blockade? True, but only because of their ongoing terrorism. The blockade would end tomorrow if they stopped trying to destroy Israel today.

So Gaza is the second Palestinian state currently in existence.

But for the two-staters, those two existing Jew-free Palestinian states just aren’t enough.

They want Judea, Samaria and Jerusalem to be the third Palestinian state.

The autonomous Palestinian Authority, with zero Jews, already acts as a State in those areas it controls, but the two-staters want it bigger, much bigger. They also want the Jewish People’s holiest sites to be included in this third Palestinian state.

And then finally, there’s little Israel, with it’s 20% Arab population, into which some two-staters want to import/flood with even more self-identified Palestinians, to eventually outnumber the Jews, creating a fourth Palestinian state.

So enough with the two-state solution, because we already have more than that.

It’s time you two-staters admit that what you really want is a four-state solution, or maybe not even that – perhaps all you really want is no-Jewish state solution.

JoeSettler

Israel Among Top Five Countries on WHO 2015 Life Expectancy Chart

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Only 22 countries around the globe have reached an average life expectancy at birth greater than 80 years, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Observatory (GHO) data, which would suggest that if one is planning to retire abroad, one should consider those countries most seriously.

Life expectancy at birth reflects the overall mortality level of a population. It summarizes the mortality pattern that prevails across all age groups in a given year – children and adolescents, adults and the elderly. Global life expectancy at birth in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), ranging from 60.0 years in the WHO African Region to 76.8 years in the WHO European Region, giving a ratio of 1.3 between the two regions. Women live longer than men all around the world. The gap in life expectancy between the sexes was 4.5 years in 1990 and had remained almost the same by 2015 (4.6).

Global average life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic, and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The 2000-2015 increase was greatest in the WHO African Region, where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV.

As to the friendly global race of whose citizens get to live longer, the top countries are, in descending order: Japan – 83.7, Switzerland – 83.4, Singapore – 83.1, Italy – 82.7, and Israel – 82.5. The US did not make the 80+ club in 2015, with only 79.3 years’ life expectancy. Neither did the Russian Federation – 70.5.

Israel’s neighbors are definitely not ideal locations for retirement: Egypt – 70.9, Jordan – 74.1, Lebanon – 74.9, and Syria – 64.5 (if you’re lucky). Nigeria stands out with 54.5 life expectancy, along with Angola – 52.4, Burkina Faso – 59.9, Burundi – 59.6, Cameroon – 57.3, Central African Republic – 52.5, Chad – 53.1, Guinea – 59, and Guinea-Bissau – 58.9.

So, here is the list of world countries where you’ll get to grow older than 80, barring unexpected circumstances:

Japan – 83.7
Switzerland – 83.4
Singapore – 83.1
Italy – 82.7
Israel – 82.5
France – 82.4
Sweden – 82.4
Canada – 82.2
Luxembourg – 82
Netherlands – 81.9
Norway – 81.8
Malta – 81.7
New Zealand – 81.6
Austria – 81.5
Belgium – 81.1
Finland – 81.1
Germany – 81
Denmark – 80.6
Chile – 80.5
Cyprus – 80.5

JNi.Media

Jordanian Parliament Boycotts Israeli Delegation: “We Don’t Recognize the Peace Treaty”

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

By Michael Bachner/TPS

Parliament Speaker Atef Tarawneh announced on Tuesday that the Jordanian Parliament has refused to approve the attendance of an Israeli delegation at an international summit held in Jordan this week. Tarawneh added that the parliament called on the organizers of the summit to shun any Israeli representation at the event, Jordanian media reported.

He explained at a press conference that the Jordanian Parliament is demonstrating through this step that it holds a position different than that of the official Jordanian stance on the peace agreement with Israel. While the leadership’s policy is to maintain the peace agreement, the House of Representatives boycotts Israel and treats it as an enemy state.

The 2016 Women in Parliaments (WIP) Global Forum is scheduled to begin in Amman on Wednesday, marking the first time it has been hosted in the Middle East. According to the organizers of the forum, some 260 female politicians and parliamentary figures, including heads of state, former European and African prime ministers, and ministers from 89 countries have confirmed that they will attend the event.

Israel and Jordan signed a peace treaty in 1994, which resolved the territorial disputes between the countries and included water-sharing agreements. The countries signed a trade treaty in 1996, and economic ties since then have developed and grown. Two years ago, Israel and Jordan signed a $500 million natural gas deal effective for 15 years.

Israel’s security and intelligence ties with Jordan are more discreet, but have likewise strengthened and developed, especially since the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011 and the rise of the Islamic State.

Relations have also hit some rocky spots in recent years, however, especially over Jewish access to the Temple Mount compound. Jordan has repeatedly demanded that Israel prevent religious Jews from entering the site, which is holy to Jews and to Muslims, and has even recalled its ambassador over the issue in the past.

Moreover, the Jordanian people, comprised mostly of self-identified “Palestinians”, mostly oppose the peace treaty and reject any form of normalization with Israel.

The recent announcement by the speaker of the parliament reflects this position and it remains to be seen whether King Abdullah and his successors will continue to maintain ties with Israel in the future or if they will concede to public opinion at some point.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Palestinian Authority Tries to Grab Dead Sea Oil Reservoir

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

The Palestinian Authority is claiming that Israel has no right to use an oil reservoir near the Dead Sea, according to a report posted late Monday night (May 2) on Twitter by Arab affairs journalist Khaled Abu Toameh. The Palestinian Authority claims the area is “under Palestinian sovereignty according to international law.”

Frankly, the argument is total hogwash. The site isn’t even anywhere near the 1949 Armistice Line, also known as the infamous “Green Line.”

The reservoir, worth $321 million, is within the Hatrurim oil and gas exploration license in the Dead Sea area. A report quoted by the Globes business news site states with 100 percent geological certainty that the reservoir could contain between 7 and 11 million barrels of oil.

It is located on a ridge high above the southwestern end of the Dead Sea, in an area called Tzuk Tamrur. The site is not far from the northern Negev city of Arad, which is perched atop the highest ridge that overlooks the southernmost section of the Dead Sea. Tzuk Tamrur is situated halfway down the road that winds down from Arad to Ein Bokek, the area in which all the luxury hotels are located along the southern Israeli shore of the Dead Sea.

The Hatrurim Formation or Mottled Zone is a 36 sq. mile geologic formation with outcrops all around the Dead Sea Basin, including the Negev Desert, the Judaean Desert, and western Jordan. It includes impure limestone along with coal-bearing chalk and marl. The rocks have been subjected to pyrometamorphism resulting from combustion of contained or underlying coal or hydrocarbon deposits. The formation is named for exposures in the Hatrurim Basin which lies west of the Dead Sea.

In 1995 Israel’s Delek Group Ltd. discovered oil after carrying out an initial drilling in the area to a depth of two kilometers. But the firm decided not to pursue further exploration because the price of oil at the time was not high enough to justify the cost of development.

Last December, the Israel Opportunity Energy Resources LP was awarded a 25 percent share in the license along with two other Israeli partners. An Israeli geologist also received a share in the license, as did a firm from Cyprus.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/palestinian-authority-tries-to-grab-dead-sea-oil-reservoir/2016/05/02/

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