web analytics
November 28, 2014 / 6 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Mark Regev’

Israel Won’t Return to Truce Talks if Rocket Fire Resumes

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Egyptian-mediated talks between Hamas and Israel for a long-term cease-fire are to begin Saturday night or Monday morning, half-way through the five-day extension of the previous 72-hour cease-fire that followed the previous humanitarian cease-fire, all of which were punctuated by rocket fire from Gaza.

You can’t keep up with this game without a scorecard, or make that two scorecards because of the extra innings. Every cease-fire, even the one that ended last night and was extended at the usual last minute, has been broken by rocket launches followed by IDF retaliation.

Remember that before the cease-fire before the last cease-fire, which was after the first cease-fire that wasn’t a cease-fire, Israel insisted it would not attend talks unless there are zero attacks from Gaza?

The Jewish Press asked Mark Regev, spokesman for Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, if that policy still is in effect.

“Definitely,” was his one-word answer. Copy, paste and save in “favorites.”

Gaza terrorists were not able to hold on to their rockets for 72 hours in this week’s cease-fire. Nearly three hours before its expiration midnight Wednesday, three rockets were launched at Israel, followed by another volley a couple of hours later.

Hamas claims it did not break the cease-fire. “They did it,” was their explanation, “they” meaning Islamic Jihad, or ISIS, or AL QAEDA, or PFLP, or the Popular Resistance Committees, or Mohammed what’s-his-name from Kahn Yunis who started up his own terrorist gang.

Hamas also has used the excuse of “they did it” to explain cease-fire failures. That also is an admission that Hamas does not have such a firm grip over Gaza, or simply is letting others do what it would like to do.

As reported here Wednesday, Hamas apparently is continuing to manufacture rockets, destined for Tel Aviv and Ben Gurion Airport, during the halt in violence.

Hamas can hold on to rockets without firing them about as long as a child can keep chocolate in his pocket.

It would seem that Hamas has everything to lose if it breaks the cease-fire, or even if it claims a rival or cooperating terrorist group beaks it. But Hamas is not interested in a cease-fire, which is only one more tool for it to try to maneuver Israel into an indefensible corner.

The IDF managed to destroy almost all of the terror tunnels in the war. As for rockets, the good news is that it wiped out perhaps more than half of its arsenal. The bad news is that there are many more that were not destroyed, and, as noted, Hamas still is manufacturing them.

If Hamas can get thought Saturday night without even one little rocket, one that usually explodes in open area but also can kill a few people in one explosion, the next round of charades will begin.

That leaves about two days before the official end of the current cease-fire. Hamas has almost never been able to stop attacks before the end of truces, cease-fires, “calms,” “hundas” or whatever it wants to call them.

It always wants to show that it can have the last word.

If it tries that game again, will Israel walk out?

Remember Regev’s word.

“Definitely.”

Gov’t Spokesman: No Intent to Break Hamas

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

Government spokespeople say the goal of Operation Protective Edge is “to restore peace and quiet to Israeli civilians, but they will not say that Israel’s latest military foray into the Gaza Strip is intended to bring about the complete surrender of  Hamas, Islamic Jihad or other terror gangs operating in the Strip.

As rockets continued to hold nearly all Israeli hostage on Wednesday, The Jewish Press spoke to Mark Regev, a spokesman for Prime Minister Netanyahu, about the current operation.

Jewish Press: Is the goal of this operation to obtain the total surrender of Hamas?

Mark Regev: The goal of this operation is to protect the people of the south, and all the people of Israel.

JP: We’ve heard that before, in 2008 and 2012. But it didn’t happen. What’s different this time, such that we can expect a different outcome?

MR: We will act with determination to bring about peace and quiet for the citizens of this country.

JP: Any idea how long the mission will last?

MR: As long as it takes.

JP: It sounds like the goal of this operation is short-term quiet, rather than a long-term solution to a long-term problem. Is that because we lack the ability to destroy Hamas, or the will do carry it out?

MR: I don’t accept the premise of your question. Ask another question.

JP: Over the past month, we have seen the abduction of three Israeli teenagers, a massive manhunt, the tragedy of their discovery, a horrific revenge attack, Arab riots around the country and now a major military operation. But yet, the prime minister has not delivered a major address to the country. What’s he waiting for?

MR: He spoke to the country last night.

(Hebrew-language TV and radio delivered a 1:48 minute recorded statement last night, accusing Hamas for the current escalation and calling on Israelis to “be patient”.)

JP: The prime minister has not answered questions from Israeli journalists in as long as any of my colleagues can remember. When will Mr Netanyahu answer unscripted questions from Israeli journalists?

MR: I’m sure he will do that in future.

Look How Social Abbas is on Social Media

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is about to make his tenth visit to Israel in order to “facilitate” the “peace process” and usher in the era of good will between the long-time not best of friends the Israelis and the Palestinian Arabs. Just take a gander at the photo below.  It is what is posted on the official Facebook page of Fatah, the self-described “Palestinian National Liberation Movement,” the party of Palestinian Arab leader Mahmoud Abbas.

A screenshot of the page was tweeted on Tuesday, Jan. 1, by Mark Regev, the spokesperson for the Israeli prime minister. Regev included the message, “this pic, glorifying terror, was posted by Pres Abbas’s Fatah on its FB page as #SecKerry arrives to promote peace.”

The Fatah Facebook cover photo. Does this look like Fatah is ready for peace?

The Fatah Facebook cover photo. Does this look like Fatah is ready for peace?

There is also a smaller inset picture on the Fatah Facebook page. This is a slightly updated version of the official Fatah logo. As pointed out by an observer who saw Regev’s tweet, the logo is perhaps even more alarming. It makes absolutely clear that Fatah has no interest in a negotiated “two state solution.” Neither two states, nor anything suggesting negotiations as a desired tactic, appears on the Fatah logo.

The official logo of the Fatah party

The official logo of the Fatah party

The Fatah logo has a picture of the Dome of the Rock shrine located on the Temple Mount, with a Palestinian flag waving. According to Palestinian Media Watch, the Dome represents both Islam and the Palestinian claim to all of Jerusalem. The logo also contains a map of Israel – all of Israel, Areas A, B and C, in chains. They want to liberate all of the land.  The number 49 at the top of the picture is for the 49th year of the revolution. The key, along the bottom of the picture, of course represents the claims made by Palestinian Arabs that they are still carrying the keys to the homes in Israel which were allegedly taken from them.  The gun image running along the entire right hand side of the logo suggests a peaceful path is not the one they choose.

The dove breaking free from chains represents the Palestinian Arab “political prisoners,” all of whom Fatah believes must be freed.

EmblemofIsrael.jpg

In striking contrast, the emblem of the state of Israel is a menorah, a seven-branched candelabrum, flanked by olive branches.  The menorah has been the symbol of the Jewish people for millennium.  It is intended to represent Israel as a light unto the nations. The olive branches symbolize peace. Beneath the pictures appears the word Israel in Hebrew letters.

The Likud party, the party of Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu – the party and the man are always described as “hawkish” – is simply a slightly italicized version of the word Likud in Hebrew. Likud means “consolidation” or “combination” in Hebrew.

il}likud

Perhaps these images will be forwarded to Secretary Kerry and his boss, as well as all other American politicians and other leaders who believe now is the right time to browbeat Israel into making peace with Abbas and his Fatah party, whose symbols appear above.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/look-how-social-abbas-is-on-social-media/2014/01/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: