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October 1, 2016 / 28 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘nursery school’

Gaza Rocket Hits Nursery School/Summer Camp

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The small summer camp in Sderot, filled with young children, escaped injury and death by the grace of a bomb shelter door.

The Color Red incoming rocket alert siren had been wailing off and on all night – in fact, all week long. The way to the shelter was a familiar one and this morning the drills and routines paid off.

A Qassam rocket fired by Gaza terrorists at around 8:30 a.m. slammed into the private home that doubles as a children’s summer camp. The rocket blasted part of the home into rubble, but left the shelter intact.

Just seconds before impact, the air raid siren had sent the young campers racing for the bomb shelter.

Not a moment too soon.

All the children made it to the shelter in time and were safely inside when the rocket slammed into the house.

“I heard the first ‘boom!’ Tami, the owner of the camp, told an Israeli radio interviewer. “It sounded close, but we are used to that. “The second one sounded much, much closer though.”

That second explosion was a Qassam hitting another private home and car nearby.

It’s not clear why the Iron Dome anti-missile system failed to intercept the two rockets.

A third Qassam exploded in the city as well. In fact, by 10:00 a.m. five rockets had already exploded in the western Negev.

The targeted children were treated for shock after their ordeal, although miraculously they were physically uninjured. Their future psychological condition remains to be seen. Their equally shocked parents have taken them home for the rest of the day – where they will likely be forced to make additional runs to their own private bomb shelters.

By 11:00 a.m., Gaza terrorists had fired 11 rockets and missiles at southern Israel, many causing serious damage to property in civilian communities and traumatizing the residents.

Late Wednesday night, a Qassam rocket barrage slammed directly into power lines, leaving the city of Sderot without electricity for at least 15 minutes. The rockets caused heavy damage to several structures and smashed into parked vehicles, shattering windows and more.

In a separate attack, a family was saved by its private bomb shelter after their home sustained a direct strike by another Qassam rocket the same night. The family, also accustomed to the nightly race for the shelter, managed to make it into the safe room in time — a victory that saved all of their lives. Two other rockets that landed in that same barrage exploded in open areas.

At least five rockets exploded in the area between midnight at 3:00 a.m., forcing residents of the western Negev and Gaza Belt communities to spend most — if not all — of the night again in their small private bomb shelters.

 

Rocket hit a children's summer camp in a private home. Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

Rocket hit a children’s summer camp in a private home.
Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

Close up of a house hit by a rocket. Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

Close up of a house hit by a rocket.
Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

A rocket that hit a Sderot home. Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

A rocket that hit a Sderot home.
Photo by: News 0404.co.il / Boaz Tzabari, Ariel Levi, Yaron Rappaford

Shalom Bear

Aliyah and Keeping Young with Yisrael

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

As an education writer for the nonprofit organization, Kars4Kids, and as someone who made Aliyah from Pittsburgh 34 years ago, I decided to write about the challenges of Aliyah from western countries with school age children. See the previous piece in this series, Fully Absorbed, Coming Through to the Other Side.

As a teen, Randi Lipkin spent three consecutive summers working at HASC, a camp for Jewish children with special needs. Randi’s husband Michael spent his nineteenth summer as a counselor there, and the couple both worked at HASC one summer after they were married, never knowing that someday, they would have a special needs child of their own.

The Lipkin family made Aliyah in August of 2004, with four children from Edison, New Jersey. After they made Aliyah, Randi discovered she was pregnant with Yisrael, who has Down syndrome.

Michael serves as senior editor of financial articles at a local company, Seeking Alpha. Randi is an occupational therapist who works at a “Gan Safa,” a Beit Shemesh nursery school for children with developmental language delays. The Lipkins live in Beit Shemesh.

Proud father Michael Lipkin holds newborn Yisrael Simcha (photo credit: courtesy Michael Lipkin)

Proud father Michael Lipkin holds newborn Yisrael Simcha (photo credit: courtesy Michael Lipkin)

V: Tell me a bit about your children and their adjustment to your Aliyah.

Michael: We had 4 children when made Aliyah. They were 19, 17, 14, and 3 when we moved. Our oldest, one year post-seminary, was our big Zionist and would have moved here even if we hadn’t. Her adjustment was very smooth. She married a year and half later and is now living in our neighborhood with her husband and 3 children.

Our next oldest was borderline interested in moving. As she was entering her senior year in a Flatbush Beit Yaakov the year we made Aliyah, we decided it was best for her to finish high school there while boarding with Randi’s sister who lived nearby. She subsequently came here for seminary, married soon after, and is living in Bet Shemesh with her husband and 3 children.

Our older son had the toughest adjustment. Even though he wanted to move he had a difficult time adjusting to dorm life at Maarava high school. However, he is now our most integrated child having married an Israeli girl and is currently serving his country.

Our youngest at the time adapted very well because of her young age and smarts.

V: How old were you and Randi when Randi became pregnant with Yisrael?

Michael: I was 47 and Randi was 45. We had just had our first grandson and our second daughter was married during Randi’s pregnancy.

V: How did you and Randi feel about the pregnancy? How was the level of obstetric care here compared to the care Randi received in the States during previous pregnancies?

Michael: I was ecstatic, very excited, but nervous for her. Getting pregnant at that age was nervous-making, and of course, we worried about Down syndrome.

Randi: The overall care here was fine, but I found it very weird that you develop a relationship with a doctor and then he has absolutely nothing to do with your delivery. The experience was totally different than in the states. In certain ways the doctors seemed very laidback and in other ways hyper-nervous.

I had gestational diabetes as I’d had before in my previous pregnancies. The doctor transferred my entire case to an obstetrician that handles gestational diabetes and I at one point said to the doctor, “Can we listen to the heartbeat?”

They were too focused on the diabetes. There was far less connection to me as an expectant mother compared to what I had experienced in the States. Of course, I’d had tremendous relationships with my doctors in the States, because I’d known them for 25 years. It’s just not what you have here.

Since I was having an elective, planned C-section, we paid for a private doctor instead of showing up at the hospital and just getting whoever was on duty that day and we felt very comfortable with that decision.

V: I know you gave Yisrael the middle name “Simcha” because you wanted him to always know he brought simcha, joy, into your lives. Was that immediate? Or did it take some adjusting to the idea?

Varda Meyers Epstein

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ear-to-the-ground/aliyah-and-keeping-young-with-yisrael/2013/11/26/

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